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Leadership present0925[1]
 

Leadership present0925[1]

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    Leadership present0925[1] Leadership present0925[1] Presentation Transcript

    • Outline of presentation (Multicultural Education) 1. Introduction  1.1 EDB’s policy for ethnic minorities students 1.2 Equal Opportunities Commission (EOC) stance and view towards EDBs policy 1.3 Studies conducted by the Centre for Social Policy Studies(PolyU) and Unison Hong Kong (融樂會) 2. Case study: to show what the students really need or lack of 3. Role of teachers in catering for students diverse learning needs 4. Conclusion  
    • IntroductionNo. of Ethnic minority (EM) students :10,000 (3 years ago) 12,000 (now)learning of Chinese is the greatest problem for EM students.EM students are often rejected by local universities: (a) lesser proficiency in Chinese (b) It can limit their opportunities for advancement in education and careerEOC has launched a report in 11 July 2011EOC urged EDB to offer more support to EM students.Controversial point: Is it fair to set the same Chinese proficiencyrequirement for them without adequate and appropriate support ?
    • Statistics of  Educated Ethnic Minority Population Education Level The % of EM students attained  Pre-primary level 3.2%   Upper Secondary 1.1%  level  Post-secondary 0.59%  level Source:2006 Population By-census
    • TVB News Report Summary 11.July.2011 EOC ‘s viewpoint EOC ‘s Suggestion Lack of Chinese language • An alternative curriculumsupport: • Failure for EM students to learn should be in place for EM Chinese well enough to catch students up with the curriculum. • Failure in the public exam • The government should provide • The difference in level is huge: language programmes at GCSE Chinese exam vs kindergarten level mainstream Chinese Language tests • Employers often dismiss the qualifications as “not good enough”Source : Youtube.comhttp://youtu.be/e5OwF19c0
    • EOCS stance and view towards EDBs policy  • Provide language and cultural programmes for EM students at pre-primary level • Offer intensive language courses • Provide expert guidance and support to individual schools in curriculum design • Adaptation of teaching material in Chinese language for EM students • An alternative Chinese curriculum should be developed • The unfair Chinese proficiency requirement=indirect discrimination • Huge gap (level): GCSE Chinese (up to P.3 level) vs. local mainstream Chinese curriculum Source: 1. EOC’s Report on the Working Group on Education for Ethnic Minorities  
    • A Research Report on the Education ofSouth Asian Ethnic Minority Groups in Hong Kong Studies conducted by the Centre for Social Policy Studies(PolyU) and Unison Hong Kong (融樂會) Research based on questionnaire survey on the views of EM students Data Analysis for students: 1. Profile of Respondents 2. Education and School Life 3. Aspirations 4. Home environment 5. Language 6. Sense of Belonging to HK
    • A Research Report on the Education of South Asian Ethnic Minority Groups in Hong Kong Social Policy Recommendations were made regarding the following aspects: 1. Improving education opportunities school choices/ using Cantonese which they dont understand/ less chances after F.5 level/ IVE & VTC running courses in Chinese 2. Improving teachers attitude 13% EM students: think that some teachers dislike them 27%: teachers may punish EM students more severely 30%: teachers care more for Chinese students 30%: teachers dislike teaching EM students 3. Social Work: from remedial to development promote cultural exchange between Chinese and EM students through activities
    • A Research Report on the Education of South Asian Ethnic Minority Groups in Hong Kong 4. Flexible cirriculum: responding to cultural differences Nepalese students: Maths much easier in HK/ Filipino: Maths harder/ Science easier 5. Developing Chinese curriculum for non-Chinese students Students expressed that their Chinese teachers did not take their Chinese classes seriously. 6. Mother-tongue: multicultural language policy difficult to provide EM students with mother-tongues as academic subjects =>Provide their mother-tongues as extra curricular activities 7. Toward cultural sensitive practice respect cultural religious practices: 56% students: not allowed to wear scarves and salwar/ 66.5%: not allowed to grow beard/ 69%: not allowed to put on religious signs
    • Case 1: Hena’s sisters Key problem: Low self-confidence• Hena’s three sisters: studying in one designated secondary school.• All subjects are taught in Chinese except English.• They feel frustrated because:• They scored the highest marks in English;• Other chinese-medium subjects are almost totally failed.• Asha do not have confidence to further studies after F.4 & local university.• Asha plan to be an airhostess after graduate in secondary school.Source: ATV 時事追擊 25.8.2011 《少數族裔的教育》 Part 1: 10:18”-12:09”http://youtu.be/sOd1uyb5Ras
    • Case 2: Dil’s brother Key problem: Policy confused• Dil’s brother, a Nepalese, wants to study F.1 in a designated secondary schoolBarrier in finding school:• His brother can’t speak Chinese• Designated school refuse to give chance to his brother to study• EDB’s suggestion: go to international school• They don’t have enough money to pay school feesSource: ATV Inside Story 23.8.2011 Part2: 2:05”-3:35”
    • Case 3: Iqua Key problem: GCSE should be amended • Iqua is studying in a local secondary school. • She wants to works as a doctor after graduation • She work hard to learn Chinese together with his father • She find that: GCSE is too easy (up to Primary 3 level) • The local Chinese exam is too difficult • She wants EDB to up-grade the level of GCSE • The level can be set between GCSE and local Chinese exam (i.e. the medium level)Source: ATV Inside Story 23.8.2011 Part2: 4:52”-7:31”
    • Role of teachers in catering for students diverse learning needsTOWARD A CONCEPTION OF CULTURALLY RESPONSIVECLASSROOM MANAGEMENT(CRCM)Ballenger: 5 Components of CRCM1. Recognition of One’s Own Ethnocentrism and Biases – White teachers consider their cultural norms: European, middleclass stuctures programs and discourse to be neutral and universal/ accept as normal and right =>cultural awareness: examination on the issue2. Knowledge of Students’ Cultural Backgrounds – Teachers should know about students cultural backgrounds, experiences, norms and values: a. Family background and structure/ b. Education/ c. Interpersonal relationship styles/ d. Discipline/ e. Time and space/ f. Religion/ g. Food h. Health and hygiene/ i. History, traditions, and holidays
    • Role of teachers in catering for students diverse learning needsTOWARD A CONCEPTION OF CULTURALLY RESPONSIVECLASSROOM MANAGEMENT(CRCM)Ballenger: 5 Components of CRCM1. Recognition of One’s Own Ethnocentrism and Biases – White teachers consider their cultural norms: European, middleclass stuctures programs and discourse to be neutral and universal/ accept as normal and right =>cultural awareness2. Knowledge of Students’ Cultural Backgrounds – Teachers should know about students cultural backgrounds, experiences, norms and values: a. Family background and structure/ b. Education/ c. Interpersonal relationship styles/ d. Discipline/ e. Time and space/ f. Religion/ g. Food h. Health and hygiene/ i. History, traditions, and holidays
    • 5 Components of CRCM3. Awareness of the Broader Social, Economic, and Political Context current practices and policies may reinforce institutional discrimination e.g. Banning Spanish use in school4. Ability and Willingness to Use Culturally Appropriate ManagementStrategies Monitor our behavior in terms of equitable treatment e.g. Are we patient and encouraging for all students? Do we use hairstyle and dress to form stereotypical judgements on students Find mismatches between conventional management strategies and students cultural backgrounds. e.g. Chastising Filipino students lack of independence: futile5. Commitment to Building Caring Classroom Communities Rogers and Renard (1999) : “students are motivated when they believe that teachers treat them like people and care about them personally and educationally”
    • Culturally Responsive Classroom Management: Awareness Into ActionStrategies for Enacting Culturally Responsive Classroom Management:1. Organizing the physical environment bring cultural diversity to the classroom e.g. using a map of the world/ poster depicting people of various cultural groups/ childrens individual photograph to create a jigsaw puzzle/ desk arranged in clusters to let students share together.2. Establishing expectations for behavior sit quietly and listen vs. more active, participatory (“call-response”) pattern? more collectivist vs. work independently?3. Communicating with students in culturally consistent ways using straight-forward directives (“sit down and get to work”) vs. politeness formulas (“Would you like to sit down?”).
    • Strate s for Enac gie ting Culturally Re pons s ive Clas room Manage nt: s me4. Creating caring, inclusive classrooms planned efforts to cross social borders and develop caring, respectful relationships e.g. teachers can greet students with students native language/ sharing stories about students lives, interests and activities, inviting them to make choices and decisions5. Working with families e.g. a Pakistan father doesnt allow his daughter to sit next to a boy. =>arrange student to interact with boys in small group activities instead6. Dealing with problem behaviors Teachers from dominant culture find students "rude and disruptive" and respond with anger. => should remain calm and non-defensive discuss norms with classmates like taking-turns for classroom activities
    •   Appendix I Secondary schools Admitting Greater Number of Non-Chinese Speaking ChildrenGovernment Direct Subsidy Scheme (DSS)Sir Ellis Kadoorie Secondary School (West • Delia Memorial School (Hip Wo)Kowloon) Kwun Tong, Co-EducationalYaumati, Co-Educational  Delia Memorial School (Broadway)Aided  Sham Shui Po, Co-EducationalIslamic Kasim Tuet Memorial College Pak Kau CollegeEastern, Co-Educational Yuen Long, Co-Educational St Margarets Girls College, Hong KongCaritas Tuen Mun Marden Foundation Secondary Central & Western, GirlsSchoolTuen Mun, Co-Educational Buddhist Fat Ho Memorial College Island, Co-EducationalBethel High SchoolYuen Long, Co-EducationalSalesians of Don Bosco Ng Siu Mui SecondarySchoolKwai Chung & Tsing Yi, BoysSource: Education Bureau web sitehttp://www.edb.gov.hk/index.aspx?nodeid=2&langno=2
    • Source of TV News Story• http://youtu.be/e5OwF19c0cg (TVB news report)• http://www.hkatvnews.com/v5/world.php?id=97591&p=3000005 (ATV: Inside Story)• http://youtu.be/sOd1uyb5Ras ( 時事追撃 )• http://youtu.be/gxK7Dy5NH4w ( 時事追撃 )