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Meaningful youth participation

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Jennifer Correro from TakingITGlobal outlining questions on meaningful youth participation in international decision-making -- more info on http://www.youthpolicy.org/participation/

Jennifer Correro from TakingITGlobal outlining questions on meaningful youth participation in international decision-making -- more info on http://www.youthpolicy.org/participation/

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  • City of Vaughan Youth Cabinet I was 18 when I joined, my school principal recommended that I apply since I “always seem to have an opinion about things” Together we organized a conference called The Truth About Youth – to challenge the stereotypes of our generation
  • Early experiences as a teenager influenced the concept, vision and mission of TakingITGlobal We launched an online hub and virtual resource centre for youth globally
  • In 2002 we attended our first major UN Summit – World Summit on Sustainable Development – in South Africa We joined the Youth Caucus and launched a website (EarthYouth) to help support coordination of efforts We learned about how civil society influences the policy process
  • We travelled to Ghana to meet our members – who organized a meeting! It was an inspiring expierience
  • We launched the YES Country Networks platform in Egypt 2002 at the Library of Alexandria
  • We launched National Information Society Youth Campaigns I was on the country delegation in Canada who endorsed the youth paragraph (proposed by Fiji) It was the first accepted that day! WSIS Youth Paragraph
  • We worked together with UN Habitat to facilitate the Habitat Jam (in French & Spanish) We helped to organize the youth pavilion with different presentations etc.
  • At the World Programme of Action for Youth + 10 we helped provide input through online consultations We organized a side event with the European Youth Forum I left with a strong sense of urgency – wanting to study National Youth Councils (especially in Europe) This helped provide research for CLC Canada
  • We organized the Youth Force at the International AIDS Conference in Toronto 2006 We had many dignitaries at our Pavilion in the Global Village who made commitments to youth We followed up months later to request updates
  • Need for celebration, workshops, action! Be the Change program
  • Funding, in-person courses, e-courses (via TIG)
  • We organized a student forum with Microsoft – to shape the future of innovation
  • Spaces for dialogue, training, discussion, projects
  • Youth and ICT Best Practices Publication – launched in 2009
  • Flexible space to voice opinions, to develop ideas, linkages with decision-makers Recognition
  • Youth Task Force of the World Economic Forum Youth Effect (Toolkit for Decision Makers on Engaging with Youth)
  • The issue that called me to action was leveraging youth engagement toward social change.
  • The Theory of Change; Each zones highlights the THEORETICAL thematic focus; Axes are what bring individual discussions about an Impact Measure into CONVERSATION; The aim is to show a linear but cyclical order of events; Inside each quadrant there is a secondary ‘Inspire/Inform/Involve’ process that goes on;
  • Percentage value represents the average proportion of the membership that reported a ‘Positive’ impact across all scaled questions for the quadrant; These numbers are sensitive to the number of metrics involved (Particularly Quadrant 4 – 3 metrics vs. Quad 2 with 11) Working to weight these values, ideally based on scaling constants defined through correlation analysis with offline actions, e.g. attending/organizing/creating/contacting/presenting etc. The aim is to evolve this into a Topline ‘Report Card’ to track impact by region; Can be viewed through multiple segment lenses, e.g. Region, Gender, Age, Duration, Education and custom variables like ‘Volunteer B/C of TIG’ (Q18)
  • Percentage value represents the average proportion of the membership that reported a ‘Positive’ impact across all scaled questions for the quadrant; These numbers are sensitive to the number of metrics involved (Particularly Quadrant 4 – 3 metrics vs. Quad 2 with 11) Working to weight these values, ideally based on scaling constants defined through correlation analysis with offline actions, e.g. attending/organizing/creating/contacting/presenting etc. The aim is to evolve this into a Topline ‘Report Card’ to track impact by region; Can be viewed through multiple segment lenses, e.g. Region, Gender, Age, Duration, Education and custom variables like ‘Volunteer B/C of TIG’ (Q18)
  • Percentage value represents the average proportion of the membership that reported a ‘Positive’ impact across all scaled questions for the quadrant; These numbers are sensitive to the number of metrics involved (Particularly Quadrant 4 – 3 metrics vs. Quad 2 with 11) Working to weight these values, ideally based on scaling constants defined through correlation analysis with offline actions, e.g. attending/organizing/creating/contacting/presenting etc. The aim is to evolve this into a Topline ‘Report Card’ to track impact by region; Can be viewed through multiple segment lenses, e.g. Region, Gender, Age, Duration, Education and custom variables like ‘Volunteer B/C of TIG’ (Q18)
  • Percentage value represents the average proportion of the membership that reported a ‘Positive’ impact across all scaled questions for the quadrant; These numbers are sensitive to the number of metrics involved (Particularly Quadrant 4 – 3 metrics vs. Quad 2 with 11) Working to weight these values, ideally based on scaling constants defined through correlation analysis with offline actions, e.g. attending/organizing/creating/contacting/presenting etc. The aim is to evolve this into a Topline ‘Report Card’ to track impact by region; Can be viewed through multiple segment lenses, e.g. Region, Gender, Age, Duration, Education and custom variables like ‘Volunteer B/C of TIG’ (Q18)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Meaningful Youth Participation In International Decision-Making London Youth Policy Symposium May 17-18, 2011 Jennifer Corriero, TakingITGlobal
    • 2. My first youth council experience
      • How do we shift perceptions of youth?
    • 3. TakingITGlobal Mission:
      • How can we empower youth to understand and act on the world’s greatest challenges?
    • 4. The power of technology (WSSD)
      • How can we better coordinate efforts?
    • 5. My first trip to Africa
      • How do we connect local to global?
    • 6. Youth Employment Summit Campaign
      • How do we grow networks of influence?
    • 7. National Youth Campaigns (WSIS)
      • How do we prioritize youth on the agenda?
    • 8. Youth Hub (Habitat Jam & WUF)
      • How can we learn from our experiences?
    • 9. National Youth Councils (WPAY +10)
      • How is my country represented?
    • 10. Youth-Adult Commitments Desk (IAS)
      • How can youth generate visibility & commitment from established leaders?
    • 11. World Youth Congress
      • How do we support youth-led development?
    • 12. MTV Staying Alive Foundation
      • How do we provide training and capacity-building experiences?
    • 13. Innovative Students Forum
      • How can students influence their classroom experience?
    • 14. Arab Youth Forum
      • How do we cultivate regional leadership?
    • 15. Youth & ICT for Development (GAID)
      • How do we showcase best practices?
    • 16. Youth Meeting (COP 16)
      • What do youth need in order to participate?
    • 17. Global Redesign Initiative (WEF)
      • If youth could redesign the world… what would they prioritize?
    • 18. Our Theory of Change
    • 19. Qualitative Research : Theory of Change: “ TIG opened my eyes so much. I like to call it the fuel of my passions.” (entry 263) “ Thanks to TIG I can enhance my skills and get better work with the community. (entry 710) “ TIG has been an invaluable source of inspiration, knowledge, support, and research and it has a priceless demonstration on the power of collaboration.” (entry 597) “ TIG didn’t just open my eyes, it made me believe I can change this reality and make it better.” (entry 511) Youth Development (Internal Individual) Societal Values (Internal Collective) Social Movements (External Collective) Youth Action & Participation (External Individual)
    • 20. Impact: Overview by Quadrant
        • Nine-out-of-ten TIG members have increased their awareness of different cultures and perspectives as a result of their involvement with TakingITGlobal
    • 21. Impact: Overview by Quadrant
        • Four-out-of-five TIG members have increased their optimism about the ability of youth to affect positive change as a result of their involvement with TakingITGlobal
    • 22. Key Skill Areas n=3338 Q29: Open Ends Personal Skills: Professional Skills: Issues-Focused Networking, Collaboration Compassion Technology Cross-Cultural Communication Communication, Listening, Public Speaking Understanding, Perspective Online / Youth Advocacy, Mobilization Creativity Facilitation, Teaching Resourcefulness Leadership, Negotiation Helping, Sharing Project Management, Budgeting Confidence Entrepreneurship, Fundraising Cooperation Research
    • 23. Impact: Overview by Quadrant
        • For two-thirds of members, (65.8%), involvement with TakingITGlobal has had a strong positive impact on the level of volunteer activity
    • 24. Impact: Overview by Quadrant
        • Roughly one third TIG members (32.8%) indicate having made contact with leaders in government also as a result of their TIG involvement.
    • 25. Thank you!
      • Jennifer Corriero
      • Executive Director
      • T: +1 416 977 9363 ext 314
      • E: jenergy@takingitglobal.org