Michael Bergeron, Ph.D., FACSM - "Youth Sports: Encouraging Participation and Life-long Health"

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The Youth-Nex Conference on Physical Health and Well-Being for Youth, Oct 10 & 11, 2013, University of Virginia …

The Youth-Nex Conference on Physical Health and Well-Being for Youth, Oct 10 & 11, 2013, University of Virginia

Panel 5 - Injury Prevention and Treatment

Michael F. Bergeron, Ph.D. FACSM - "Youth Sports: Encouraging Participation and Life-long Physical Activity, Fitness and Health"

Bergeron is the Executive Director of the National Youth Sports Health & Safety Institute and a Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Sanford School of Medicine of the University of South Dakota at the Sanford USD Medical Center.

Website: http://bit.ly/YNCONF13

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  • 1. A Presentation for THE 3RD ANNUAL YOUTH-NEX CONFERENCE PHYSICAL HEALTH & WELL-BEING FOR YOUTH YOUTH SPORTS: ENCOURAGING PARTICIPATION AND LIFE-LONG PHYSICAL ACTIVITY October 11, 2013 Michael F. Bergeron, Ph.D., FACSM Executive Director, National Youth Sports Health & Safety Institute Professor, Department of Pediatrics Sanford School of Medicine of The University of South Dakota Senior Scientist, Sanford Children's Health Research Center
  • 2. • 91% of Americans feel sports participation is important for children and adolescents as part of an active, healthy lifestyle • 94% feel more needs to be done to ensure the health and safety of youth athletes
  • 3. The National Youth Sports Health & Safety Institute will be the recognized leader and advocate for advancing and disseminating the latest research and evidence-based education, recommendations and policy to enhance the experience, development, health and safety of our youth in sports. “There is no question our young people need to be active, and participating in youth sports is an important component to that activity. However, too many of these young athletes are doing too much, too fast – some even suffering serious and life-threatening and life-altering injuries. This new institute will support youth athletics while also creating guidelines to protect their health and safety,” said Michael F. Bergeron, Ph.D., FACSM, Executive Director - National Youth Sports Health & Safety Institute.
  • 4. Urgent Areas of Focus Sports Trauma Environmental Challenges Training & Competition Overload ASSESSMENT and RESEARCH EDUCATION and OUTREACH GUIDELINES and POLICY Playing with Chronic Disease & Disability
  • 5. Partnerships • • • • • Datalys Center for Sport Injury Research NCAA NFHS Sport Governing Bodies Medical and Sports Medicine Academies, Societies and Associations • …And Other Youth Sports Stakeholders
  • 6. National Leadership Board Michael F. Bergeron, Ph.D., FACSM - Chair David A. Pearce, Ph.D. Executive Director, National Youth Sports Health & Safety Director, Sanford Children’s Health Research Center, Sanford Research USD Institute Professor, Department of Pediatrics Professor, Department of Pediatrics Sanford School of Medicine of The University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine of The University of South Dakota Senior Scientist, Sanford Children's Health Research Center Karin A. Pfeiffer, Ph.D., FACSM Thomas M. Best, MD, PhD, FACSM Professor and Pomerene Endowed Chair Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Biostatistics Director, Division of Sports Medicine Co-Medical Director, The OSU Sports Medicine Center Team Physician, OSU Athletic Department Ohio State University Past-President, American College of Sports Medicine Nailah Coleman, MD, FAAP, FACSM Attending, Division of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Children’s National Medical Center Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Orthopaedics The George Washington University Medical Center John P. DiFiori, MD Associate Professor, Michigan State University Department of Kinesiology Center for Physical Activity and Health Christopher M. Powers, PT, PhD, FACSM, FAPTA Associate Professor Director, Program in Biokinesiology Co-Director, Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Research Lab USC Division of Biokinesiology & Physical Therapy William O. Roberts, MD, MS, FACSM Professor - Department of Family Medicine and Community Health University of Minnesota Medical School Program Director University of Minnesota St John’s Health East Family Medicine Residency Past-President, American College of Sports Medicine Professor and Chief, Representative Mike McIntyre: North Carolina Division of Sports Medicine, 9th term as North Carolina’s 7th Congressional District Representative Department of Family Medicine, Ex-Officio Board Member: National Youth Sports Health & Safety Institute David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Committee Assignments: House Agricultural and Armed Services Committee Team Physician, UCLA Department of Intercollegiate Athletics Congressional Caucus on Youth Sports: Co-Chairman and Co-Founder Congressional Waterways Caucus: Co-Chairman and Co-Founder Gary Hall, Jr. Congressional Prayer Caucus: Co-Chairman 3-time Olympic Swimmer; 10-time Olympic Medalist Friends of Scotland Caucus: Co-Chairman and Co-Founder Sanford Children’s International Board member Special Operations Forces Caucus: Co-Chairman and Co-Founder Mindy Millard-Stafford, Ph.D., FACSM Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology School of Applied Physiology Past-President, American College of Sports Medicine
  • 7. Congressional Comments
  • 8. Congressional Briefing – Physical Activity, Fitness, Health & Disease Prevention • Highlight the value of and the role youth sports can play in fitness, health, and academic achievement • Recognize the challenges facing youth sports and young athletes • Work with Congress and Federal agencies to craft and promote creative solutions to promote youth fitness and health through healthy sports July 26, 2012 (Rep. Bilbray – CA; Rep. Kind –WI)
  • 9. The Culture of Youth Sports • Exclusion vs. Inclusion – Early Specialization – Year-round Training & Competition – Travel Away from Home – Professional Development Model – Unsustainable Demands & Conflicts • Escalating Injuries and Ongoing Dropout
  • 10. Overuse – A Preventable Problem • Key Contributing Factors – Excessive repeated submaximal loading, without sufficient rest & recovery to allow positive adaptations – Growing and immature bodies are less capable of handling the stress – Early specialization • Encourages overload and overuse • Limits exposure to other sports and activities • Limits athletic capacity, resilience and often performance
  • 11. Overuse – A Preventable Problem • The Solution – Development takes time • Diversified, balanced and progressive athletic exposure and development across childhood and adolescence – Functional movement, balance, strength, endurance and neuromuscular control • Musculoskeletal injury risk is reduced • Athletic capacity and sustained performance are enhanced
  • 12. Overuse – A Preventable Problem • The Solution (cont.) – Prior injury history is one of the best determinants of injury risk – No child should train or play hurt – If an injury occurs, • Essential that recovery and rehabilitation is complete prior to returning to play • Contributing factors need to be addressed and corrected – Biomechanics, excessive training load and expectations, fitness, maturity…
  • 13. Overuse – A Preventable Problem • The Solution (cont.) – Provide enough time and sufficient rest between training sessions, matches or games, and tournaments • • • • Enhances recovery Minimizes “carry-over” effects Reduces injury risk Enhances performance – Coaches, Tournament Directors, Youth Sports Governing Bodies…and Parents!
  • 14. The Message • 50 million Kids in Community Sports – 8 million high school student athletes – 440,000 NCAA student-athletes – High school to being a professional athlete: < 0.1% • Think long-term, diversified and progressive athletic development • Minimize preventable injury risk and stay well-rested, well-nourished and healthy • Keep it fun!
  • 15. Foundation for a Healthy Life Making Youth Sports a Public Health SolutionSM