William H. Dietz, M.D., Ph.D. - Keynote - "What Can We Do To Increase Physical Activity in Youth?"

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The Youth-Nex Conference on Physical Health and Well-Being for Youth, Oct 10 & 11, 2013, University of Virginia

William H. Dietz, M.D., Ph.D. - "What Can We Do To Increase Physical Activity in Youth?"

Until July 2012, Dietz was the Director of the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity at the CDC. Prior to his appointment to the CDC, he was a Professor of Pediatrics at the Tuft's University School of Medicine, and Director of Clinical Nutrition at the Floating Hospital of New England Medical Center Hospitals.

Website: http://bit.ly/YNCONF13

Published in: Health & Medicine, Education
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  • WALK?
    I thought you might like to what see the map looks like now that we are including other communities and states that are reporting their results.
     
    Of course The states, like Calif, have variation among their counties- with some showing improvements and others continuing to increase. We will continue to track down reports and include links to the reports and local news stories on our web. We aim to become the go to source for signs of progress
  • Children are often active in short bursts. For them, every minute counts (10 minutes at a time not required to count).
    Guidelines for children and adolescents include aerobic and muscle and bone-strengthening activities. Note that they should do vigorous intensity physical activity at least 3 days a week.
  • Children are often active in short bursts. For them, every minute counts (10 minutes at a time not required to count).
    Guidelines for children and adolescents include aerobic and muscle and bone-strengthening activities. Note that they should do vigorous intensity physical activity at least 3 days a week.
  • Nine partner organizations have agreed to adopt the three guiding principles
  • William H. Dietz, M.D., Ph.D. - Keynote - "What Can We Do To Increase Physical Activity in Youth?"

    1. 1. What Can We Do to Increase Physical Activity in Youth? William H. Dietz MD, PhD Consultant, Institute of Medicine Senior Adviser Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
    2. 2. Obesity Trends in Children < 5yo Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System
    3. 3. Obesity Trends in Youth over the Past 12 Years Ogden et al. 2012, NCHS data brief
    4. 4. Childhood Obesity: Signs of Progress Kearney, NE Fitchburg, MA Somerville, MA NYC West Virginia California Philadelphia, PA New Mexico Vance, NC Chula Vista, CA El Paso, TX Anchorage, AK Mississippi
    5. 5. Energy Deficits Necessary to Achieve the HP 2010 (Prevalence = 5%) by 2020 Age 2-5 yo 6-11 yo 12-19 yo Deficit 33 Kcal/d 149 Kcal/d 177 Kcal/d Wang YC et al. Am J Prev Med 2012; 42:437
    6. 6. Effects of Physical Activity on Morbidity and Mortality across the Life Span Physical Activity Physical Activity In Childhood In Childhood Morbidity in Morbidity in Childhood Childhood Physical Activity Physical Activity in Adolescence in Adolescence Morbidity in Morbidity in Adolescence Adolescence Physical Activity Physical Activity in Adulthood in Adulthood Hallal et al. Sports Med 2006;36:1019 Morbidity in Morbidity in Adults Adults Mortality in Mortality in Adults Adults
    7. 7. Physical Activity Guidelines – Children and Adolescents (ages 6–17) • 1 hour (60 minutes) or more of daily physical activity that is at least moderate: – Most of the 1 or more hours a day should be either moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity – Do vigorous-intensity physical activity at least 3 days a week http://www.health.gov/paguidelines 7
    8. 8. Key Guidelines – Children and Adolescents (ages 6-17) (cont.) - Include muscle-strengthening activities at least 3 days a week - Include bone-strengthening activities at least 3 days a week • Physical activities should be age appropriate, enjoyable, and offer variety http://www.health.gov/paguidelines 8
    9. 9. % High School Students Achieving 60’ MVPA - YRBS 2011 CDC. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance. MMWR 2012; 61:1
    10. 10. Average Minutes/d of AccelerometerMeasured MVPA Kohl HW III, Cook HC. Educating the Student Body, IOM 2013.
    11. 11. Opportunities for School-wide Physical Activity Kohl HW III, Cook HC. Educating the Student Body, IOM 2013.
    12. 12. Decline in Active Transportation to and from School in 1969 and 2001; Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey Kohl HW III, Cook HC. Educating the Student Body, IOM 2013.
    13. 13. Opportunities for School-wide Physical Activity Kohl HW III, Cook HC. Educating the Student Body, IOM 2013.
    14. 14. Frequency of School PE – SHPPS 2006 Elementary Middle High School Daily PE 4% 8% 2% PE 3d/w 14% 15% 3% Note: No school level data in 2012 SHPPS Lee SM et al. J School Health 2007;77:435
    15. 15. Changes in Required or Recommended Recess 2006-2012 38% 33% % Lee SM et al. J School Health 2007;77:435; Lee SM et al. SHPPS 2012 www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/SHPPS/2012
    16. 16. Percent of Schools that Do Not Provide Recess to First Grade Students Kohl HW III, Cook HC. Educating the Student Body, IOM 2013.
    17. 17. Changes in Activity Breaks SHPPS 20062012 % of Schools Lee SM et al. J School Health 2007;77:435; Lee SM et al. SHPPS 2012 www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/SHPPS/2012
    18. 18. Energy Costs of Opportunities for PA in Schools 11 17 27 33 37 Bassett DR et al. PCFSN Research Digest March 2013; Series 14 #1
    19. 19. Evidence of Effectiveness of School Programs for PA School-based PA interventions •Increases duration of PA for 5 - 45’/day •Decreases TV time from 5 – 60’/day •Increases VO2 max •Participants 3 times more likely to engage in MVPA Dobbins M et al. School-based PA programs for promoting PA and fitness in children and adolescents aged 6-18. Cochrane Rev 2013
    20. 20. Opportunities for School-wide Physical Activity Kohl HW III, Cook HC. Educating the Student Body, IOM 2013.
    21. 21. Percent of Boys and Girls Participating in Sports 1971-2011 Kohl HW III, Cook HC. Educating the Student Body, IOM 2013.
    22. 22. Participation in Interscholastic Sports by Boys and Girls by Availability of Sports Facilities 2009-2011 Colabianchi N. Bridging the Gap in Kohl HW III, Cook HC. Educating the Student Body, IOM 2013.
    23. 23. Healthy Kids Out of School: Drink Right, Snack Smart, Move More
    24. 24. Strategies to Increase Physical Activity in Youth • Implement the Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Report • Mobilize parents • Convene all relevant groups to develop and implement a strategic plan • Improve the research base that links PA to behavior and academic performance • Use QRIS, state, and local policies to implement PA standards in ECE • Engage health providers at all levels in Exercise is Medicine
    25. 25. Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth – PAG Midcourse Report Sufficient evidence •Multi-component PA in schools •Physical education program Suggestive evidence •Active transportation •Early Care and Education •Built environment Emerging evidence •Activity breaks
    26. 26. Strategies to Increase Physical Activity in Youth • Implement the Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Report • Mobilize parents • Convene all relevant groups to develop and implement a strategic plan • Improve the research base that links PA to behavior and academic performance • Use QRIS, state, and local policies to implement PA standards in ECE • Engage health providers at all levels in Exercise is Medicine
    27. 27. Parental Support for Physical Education • A majority believe that PE is as important as other subjects (CDC 2010) • Over 90% believe there should be more PE in schools (HSPH 2003) • Over 75% think more PE could help prevent or control childhood obesity (NASPE 2009) • 95% believe that daily PA helps children do better academically and should be part of K-12 curriculum (NASPE 2003)
    28. 28. National Physical Activity Plan – Strategy 2 Tactics • Binding requirements for Pre K-12 standards-based PE that address curriculum time, class size and employment of certified PE teachers • Local, state and national standards for high levels of PA in PE • Federal legislation to require school accountability for the quality and quantity of PE programs
    29. 29. National Physical Activity Plan – Strategy 2 Tactics • Local state and federal funding to assure that schools have the necessary resources, especially for under-resourced schools • State-level policies to monitor quality and quantity of PA and PE programs • Require school districts to collect, monitor and track fitness data including BMI
    30. 30. Strategies to Increase Physical Activity in Youth • Implement the Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Report • Mobilize parents • Convene all relevant groups to develop and implement a strategic plan • Improve the research base that links PA to behavior and academic performance • Use QRIS, state, and local policies to implement PA standards in ECE • Engage health providers at all levels in Exercise is Medicine
    31. 31. Children in Early Care and Education Programs In 2001, 73% of preschool children ages 3-5 years old (8.6 million children) participated in at least one weekly non-parental care arrangement Nearly 60% of children 3-4 years with employed mothers participate in center-based care 41% of preschool children are in child care for 35 or more hours/week Capizzano J et al. www.urban .org/url.cfm?ID=309438; www.urban .org/url.cfm? ID=309439
    32. 32. Strategies to Increase Physical Activity in Early Care and Education • Provide portable play equipment on playgrounds and play spaces • Train staff in delivery of structured PA and increase PA session time • Integrate PA into teaching and learning activities • Increase outdoor time Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Report. www.health.gov/guidelines
    33. 33. Strategies to Increase Physical Activity in Youth • Implement the Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Report • Mobilize parents • Convene all relevant groups to develop and implement a strategic plan • Improve the research base that links PA to behavior and academic performance • Use QRIS, state, and local policies to implement PA standards in ECE • Engage health providers at all levels in Exercise is Medicine
    34. 34. PA Counseling by Pediatricians • Over 60% of pediatricians and family practitioners ask specific questions about the dose of PA1 • Overweight and obese patients more likely to receive PA counseling2 • Physician’s BMI predicts likelihood of counseling3 1. Huang T, et al. Am J Prev Med 2011;41:24-32 2. Liang L, et al. Pediatrics 2012;130:67 3. Bleich SN et al. Obesity 2012;20:999
    35. 35. Five Conditions for Collective Success Common agenda Shared measurement systems Mutually reinforcing activities Continuous communication Backbone support for ongoing actions Kania J and Kramer M. Collective impact. Stanford Social Innovation Review 2100 (winter); 59

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