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Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
Healthcare and social media
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Healthcare and social media

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This presentation to the IU School of Medicine Department of Public Health looks at the gap in internet usage of people with chronic illnesses and the direction of online health content in the future.

This presentation to the IU School of Medicine Department of Public Health looks at the gap in internet usage of people with chronic illnesses and the direction of online health content in the future.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
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  • 1. HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL MEDIA <br />Rodger D. Johnson, MA<br />Inbound Marketing Certified<br />
  • 2. U.S. adults living with chronic disease are significantly less likely than healthy adults to have access to the internet (62% vs. 81%)<br />
  • 3. Living with chronic disease is also associated, once someone is online, with a greater likelihood to access user-generated health content such as blog posts, hospital reviews, doctor reviews, and podcasts.<br />
  • 4. These resources allow an internet user to dive deeply into a health topic, using the internet as a communications tool, not simply an information vending machine. <br />Chronic Diseases &amp; the Internet<br />Pew Internet And American Life Project<br />
  • 5. The internet access gap creates an online health information gap. <br /><ul><li>81% of adults reporting no chronic diseases go online.
  • 6. 62% of adults living with one or more chronic disease go online.</li></ul>People managing multiple diseases are less likely to have internet access<br /><ul><li>68% of adults reporting one chronic disease go online.
  • 7. 52% of adults living with two or more chronic diseases go online.</li></li></ul><li>Health professionals dominate the information mix<br />93% of adults living with chronic disease ask a health professional for information or assistance in dealing with health or medical issues<br />Adults who report no chronic conditions are significantly more likely to turn to the internet as a source of health information and less likely to contact their insurance provider<br />Pew Internet &amp; American Life Project<br />Chronic Disease and the Internet<br />
  • 8. However, the social life of chronic disease information is robust<br />There are two activities which stand out among people living with chronic disease: <br /><ul><li>Blogging
  • 9. Online health discussions</li></ul>Pew Internet &amp; American Life Project<br />Chronic Disease and the Internet<br />
  • 10. The internet is like a secret weapon – if someone has access to it<br /><ul><li>They are disproportionately offline
  • 11. They often have complicated health issues, not easily solved by the addition of even the best, most reliable, medical advice</li></ul>Those who are online have a trump card<br />Having a chronic disease increases the probability that an internet user will share what they know and learn from their peers<br />Pew Internet &amp; American Life Project<br />Chronic Disease and the Internet<br />
  • 12. Those who are online have a trump card<br /><ul><li>Having a chronic disease increases the probability that an internet user will share what they know and learn from their peers
  • 13. They unearth nuggets of information
  • 14. They blog
  • 15. They participate in online discussions</li></ul>They just keep going<br />Pew Internet &amp; American Life Project<br />Chronic Disease and the Internet<br />
  • 16. ACCU CHEK DIABETES LINK: A CASE STUDY<br />
  • 17. ACCU CHEK DIABETES LINK: A CASE STUDY<br />A blog: You can subscribe to the blog via RSS or e-mail. You can also share the blog articles, but you cannot add comments<br /><ul><li> Links to various diabetes online resources: “What we’re reading”,
  • 18. Diabetes news from online sources: “In the News”
  • 19. product and corporate information</li></li></ul><li>ACCU CHEK DIABETES LINK: A CASE STUDY<br />A widget called ‘The NEST‘ which helps diabetes tweeps stay in contact with one another and even introduce themselves to the diabetes community on Twitter.  <br />The NEST widget can easily be shared and posted anywhere online.<br />
  • 20. ACCU CHEK DIABETES LINK: A CASE STUDY<br />
  • 21. ACCU CHEK DIABETES LINK: A CASE STUDY<br />
  • 22. ACCU CHEK DIABETES LINK: A CASE STUDY<br />
  • 23. ACCU CHEK DIABETES LINK: A CASE STUDY<br />What is the objective of the Accu-Check Diabetes Link site?<br />To reach out to people with diabetes and help connect them to information and resources that could help them lead more healthy lives.<br />
  • 24. ACCU CHEK DIABETES LINK: A CASE STUDY<br />What steps did Roche Diagnostics take initially before implementing the social site?<br /><ul><li>Active listening
  • 25. Blogger relations (Roche Social Media Summit)
  • 26. Understand their concerns and discover areas where the bloggers and Roche Diagnostics could work together
  • 27. Bloggers’ feedback helped shape the Diabetes Link pilot program in Canada</li></li></ul><li>ACCU CHEK DIABETES LINK: A CASE STUDY<br />Other Data<br /><ul><li>Site gets substantial global traffic, most of which comes from Canada
  • 28. Traffic to the site is organically driven
  • 29. For senior management buy-in and support: Did Roche have resources to provide the community with helpful information and knowledge swiftly and prudently
  • 30. Departments involved: Marketing, PR, customer service, legal and regulatory</li></li></ul><li>Where we have been<br />Where we are going<br />
  • 31. Where we have been<br />
  • 32. Where we are going<br />
  • 33. QUESTIONS &amp; DISCUSSION<br />Rodger D. Johnson, MA<br />Twitter: @getsocialpr <br />Blog: www.getsocialpr.com<br />

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