Chemical Bonding Part II copyrights © youmarks.com
Polar Bonds <ul><li>Ionic and covalent bonds are two ideal types. </li></ul><ul><li>Many bonds share characteristics of bo...
Polar Bonds copyrights © youmarks.com
Metallic Bonding <ul><li>Electron SEA Model for METALS </li></ul><ul><li>Metals are formed from elements on the left hand ...
Metallic Bonding copyrights © youmarks.com
Metallic Bonding copyrights © youmarks.com
Intra-molecular Forces <ul><li>In addition to covalent, polar, ionic and metallic bonding there are intermolecular forces ...
Intra-molecular Forces copyrights © youmarks.com
Intra-molecular Forces copyrights © youmarks.com
Intra-molecular Forces copyrights © youmarks.com
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Basics of Chemical Bonding - 2

3,155

Published on

Chemical Bonding Part 2

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,155
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
50
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Basics of Chemical Bonding - 2

  1. 1. Chemical Bonding Part II copyrights © youmarks.com
  2. 2. Polar Bonds <ul><li>Ionic and covalent bonds are two ideal types. </li></ul><ul><li>Many bonds share characteristics of both ionic and covalent bonding. They are called polar covalent bonds and they tend to occur between atoms of moderately different electronegativities. </li></ul><ul><li>In polar covalent bonds the electrons belong predominantly to one type of atom while they are still partially shared by the other type, as illustrated in the pictures of the valence electron densities. </li></ul>copyrights © youmarks.com
  3. 3. Polar Bonds copyrights © youmarks.com
  4. 4. Metallic Bonding <ul><li>Electron SEA Model for METALS </li></ul><ul><li>Metals are formed from elements on the left hand side </li></ul><ul><li>of the periodic table. Having generally low electronegativity </li></ul><ul><li>they tend to lose their valence electrons easily. </li></ul><ul><li>When we have a macroscopic collection of the same </li></ul><ul><li>or similar type of metallic atoms, the valence electrons </li></ul><ul><li>are detached from the atoms but not held by any of </li></ul><ul><li>the other atoms. In other words, these valence electrons </li></ul><ul><li>are free from any particular atom and are only </li></ul><ul><li>held collectively by the entire assemblage of atoms. </li></ul><ul><li>In a metal the ion cores are held more or less at fixed </li></ul><ul><li>places in an ordered, or crystal, lattice. The valence </li></ul><ul><li>electrons are free to move about under applied stimulation, </li></ul><ul><li>such as electric fields or heat. </li></ul>copyrights © youmarks.com
  5. 5. Metallic Bonding copyrights © youmarks.com
  6. 6. Metallic Bonding copyrights © youmarks.com
  7. 7. Intra-molecular Forces <ul><li>In addition to covalent, polar, ionic and metallic bonding there are intermolecular forces which contribute to the stability of things. These include dipole-dipole forces, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces. </li></ul>copyrights © youmarks.com
  8. 8. Intra-molecular Forces copyrights © youmarks.com
  9. 9. Intra-molecular Forces copyrights © youmarks.com
  10. 10. Intra-molecular Forces copyrights © youmarks.com
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×