Accelerating Development
Using the Web:
George Sadowsky, ed.
Empowering Poor and
Marginalized Populations
George Sadowsky
...
Chapter 7 (Health) © World Health Organization [2012]. All rights reserved.
The World Health Organization has granted the ...
Accelerating Development Using the Web | Foreword from the Rockefeller Foundation i
Foreword from the Rockefeller Foundati...
Accelerating Development Using the Web | Foreword from the World Wide Web Foundation iii
Foreword from the World Wide Web ...
Accelerating Development Using the Web | Preface v
Preface
This work is the result of the contributions, large and small, ...
Accelerating Development Using the Web | Prefacevi
The evolution of ICTs, as well as their application to development, is ...
vii
Foreword from the Rockefeller Foundation����������������������������������������������������������������������� i
Fore...
viii
Development Community and Development Finance Institutions������������������������������������������������ 44
Some Ou...
ix
New ICTs, Freedom and Equality�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������...
x
Applications: the Web of the Possible�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������...
xi
in developing countries use?�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������...
xii
The Market Place������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������...
xiii
Chapter 12 – Language and Content������������������������������������������������������������������������������������...
Executive Summary
The overall purpose of the book Accelerating Development Using the Web: Empowering Poor and Marginal-
iz...
Accelerating Development Using the Web | Executive Summary2
Where in the industrial nations, we take connectivity and band...
Accelerating Development Using the Web | Executive Summary 3
Chapter 2 – Fundamental Access Issues describes how Internet ...
Accelerating Development Using the Web | Executive Summary4
Chapters 5 through 10 address the uses of ICTs to assist progr...
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Accelerating development using the web
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Accelerating development using the web

3,106 views
3,025 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,106
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Accelerating development using the web

  1. 1. Accelerating Development Using the Web: George Sadowsky, ed. Empowering Poor and Marginalized Populations George Sadowsky Najeeb Al-Shorbaji Richard Duncombe Torbjörn Fredriksson Alan Greenberg Nancy Hafkin Michael Jensen Shalini Kala Barbara J. Mack Nnenna Nwakanma Daniel Pimienta Tim Unwin Cynthia Waddell Raul Zambrano Cover image: Paul Butler http://paulbutler.org/archives/visualizing-facebook-friends/ Creative Commons License Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0
  2. 2. Chapter 7 (Health) © World Health Organization [2012]. All rights reserved. The World Health Organization has granted the Publisher permission for the reproduction of this chapter. This work, with the exception of Chapter 7 (Health), is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.
  3. 3. Accelerating Development Using the Web | Foreword from the Rockefeller Foundation i Foreword from the Rockefeller Foundation For almost 100 years, the Rockefeller Foundation has been at the forefront of new ideas and innovations related to emerging areas of technology. In its early years, the Foundation advanced new technologies to eradicate hookworm and develop a vaccine for yellow fever, creating a lasting legacy of strengthening the application of new technologies to improve the lives of the world’s poor and vulnerable. By the middle of the 20th century, this approach led the Foundation to the pre-cursor to the modern day comput- er. At the dawn of the digital era in 1956, the Foundation helped launch the field of artificial intelligence through its support for the work of John McCarthy, the computing visionary who coined the term. More recently, the Foundation has supported the use of mobile information and communication technologies in expanding access to healthcare services, in providing farmers with commodity prices and weather related information, and in providing web-based employment opportunities for individuals in low-income areas of cities and rural towns. At the Rockefeller Foundation, we have a deep respect for the myriad innovators, entrepreneurs, and forward- looking thinkers who are using the web to expand economic opportunities for social development. As expressed so eloquently by the many contributors to this book, we share an abiding concern that the benefits of the web be marshaled to improve the well-being of all people. In so doing, we anticipate that by expanding access to and use of the web, we will ensure that a greater number of individuals and communities will become more resilient and better able to respond to unexpected man-made and natural shocks, and that societies will grow more equi- tably over time through improved access to new opportunities. Our support of this compendium is just one part of a suite of thought-provoking efforts to rethink the ways in which new technologies could be better positioned for greater impact across the development landscape. How- ever, technology is only one – albeit very important – driver of social change. At the Foundation, we take an integrated approach that considers the interactions among the various political, economic and environmental complexities of a system. This holistic perspective, we believe, allows for a more nuanced understanding of the different dimensions that need to come together to solve critical problems and implement novel solutions. As the web continues to define the 21st century, we are grateful to the World Wide Web Foundation for bringing together such a diverse array of experts from different backgrounds and disciplines to share their points of view. We are excited to hear your thoughts and reactions to this publication, and we hope that this will be a useful resource to all of those in the public, private, and civil society sectors that are committed to working to make the web a tool for social innovation on a global scale. Zia Khan and Evan Michelson The Rockefeller Foundation
  4. 4. Accelerating Development Using the Web | Foreword from the World Wide Web Foundation iii Foreword from the World Wide Web Foundation The World Wide Web is just over 20 years old. It has transformed how knowledge is created and shared. It has transformed how people and nations communicate. The Web is now an essential component of modern life, a significant driver of economic value and a powerful enabler of political and social change. For all these reasons, most Web users will be surprised to learn that they are in the minority – only about 30% of the world’s population are using and benefiting from the Web at this time in history. However, in terms of its potential contribution to economic, political and social development, the need for access to and effective use of the Web is greatest where such access is most rare. The poor, the underrepresented and the vulnerable can in theory gain immensely from what the Web has to offer, but for a variety of reasons — poverty, illiteracy, remoteness, language, restrictive regulation — they are unable to benefit from it. There is an urgent opportunity to accelerate Web usage and impact for these billions who need it most, and the Web Foundation aims to close this gap. For example, we are working in Mali and India to explore ways to provide voice access to the Web on simple mobile phones, thus opening the Web to people without Internet connectivity and/or with low literacy. We are giving bright, young entrepreneurs in Senegal, Ghana and Kenya the technical and business skills and nurturing environment to create applications on the Web that could address commercial and social needs. We are testing and demonstrating the potential value of Web access to address real-world problems, by empowering rural community radio stations and journalists, and helping farmers share information needed to push back the Sahara desert to claim useful agricultural land. Our objective is that our interventions will, like the Web itself, be able to scale to reach all those around the world who could benefit from them. This book explores the fundamental factors that are shaping the use of the Web for social and economic de- velopment. It describes the contributors that shape how the Internet grows, and how the Web can be made available to and effective for those billions in need. It addresses issues currently restricting access to the Web — political, technological, economic, cultural and linguistic — and suggests what mechanisms can be brought to bear to accelerate its utilization for poor and underserved populations. The Web has brought many changes to our world. It is increasingly difficult to remember how we functioned in our pre-Web existence. The Web Foundation is working to accelerate the growth of the community of Web users, and to accelerate the value of the Web for that entire community. It is our hope that this volume and the insights within it will enable policy makers, practitioners, funders, and all others concerned with development and the realization of human potential everywhere to contribute more effectively toward that goal. Steven Bratt The World Wide Web Foundation
  5. 5. Accelerating Development Using the Web | Preface v Preface This work is the result of the contributions, large and small, of a significant number of people. The evolution and application of ICT for Development has grown far beyond its initial stages, and ICTs are now thoroughly enmeshed in many substantive and policy aspects of social and economic development in its broadest sense. This publication therefore is necessarily the result of contributions by specialists in various dimensions of this field, and we are grateful to them for having shared their considerable knowledge and experience. Any discussion of the role of ICTs in economic and social development is aiming at a moving target. While the problems that affect developing countries specifically, and all countries to some extent, are well identified, the technological environment changes rapidly and it takes some time to explore how such changes can be ex- ploited to ameliorate the problems. Such a focus sometimes appears to be very “tool oriented,” and may give a misleading impression that the focus has been directed away from the more fundamental social and economic goals. The focus is rather upon how the rapidly evolving tools of ICT can assist in achieving these goals and the nature of their strengths and limitations in doing so. One might question the need for another exposition of the role of ICTs in development when much has already been written about it. One reason is that most writing in the field concerns itself with specific application areas or pilot applications, rather than surveying the field more generally. Furthermore, as the Internet spreads, the is- sue of accessibility by poor, vulnerable and underserved individuals and communities becomes more important to achieve true inclusiveness, regardless of whether they are in a developing or a developed country. If the use of ICTs and the Web have proven so beneficial for the developed world, surely their extension for use by others cannot be withheld. This monograph specifically addresses this issue and reports on current policy and techni- cal initiatives in this area. In addition, technical progress in this area is rapid, and we believe that it is useful to present a current picture of tools, needs and possibilities. This is a book about both ICTs and the World Wide Web. While the Web is one application of many existing on top of the Internet, it is the application that provides the principal window through which users increasingly access ICTs and which is evolving to permeate many aspects of daily life. The rapid evolution of the Web from its static beginning to the rich interactive interoperable media platform that it is today indicates that it is likely to be the principal platform for new development for the foreseeable future. It therefore deserves significant at- tention for its potential in making further significant contributions to assisting poor and underserved individuals and communities throughout the world. This monograph is oriented toward several classes of audiences. We have used an advanced tutorial style, that exposes the reader to the main thrust of application of ICTs to development, including the history of ICTs ap- plied to development, the technical infrastructure and interfaces used to deliver ICT-based services in develop- ing environments, important areas of development and ICT-based activities taking place within them, and the cultural environment into which ICTs are being introduced and the effects of that introduction. The content should be of interest to those who are involved with policy formulation and implementation of ICT-related as- sistance, as well as funders who are involved with investment decisions in this area. In addition, the contents can provide a general education on the subject for interested readers.
  6. 6. Accelerating Development Using the Web | Prefacevi The evolution of ICTs, as well as their application to development, is an increasingly broad and complex sub- ject, and no one individual is capable of covering all of their aspects. The creation of this monograph is there- fore a team effort; each section has been written by a specialist in the area being described. The major authors for each section are identified in each section, and an Appendix contains a short biography and a photograph for each of them. We are grateful to them for agreeing to contribute their knowledge and experience to this effort. A number of reviewers were instrumental in contributing to and improving the contents of this volume. In par- ticular we would like to thank Josema Alonso, Stéphane Boyera, Olivier Crépin–Leblond, William Drake, Max Froumentin, Richard Fuchs, Gary Garriott, Aman Grewal, Michael Gurstein, Johan Hellstrom, Franco Papes- chi, Larry Press and the authors for their diligent reading of the manuscript and for their perceptive comments and constructive criticism that have helped to make this a better product. Special thanks are due to Najeeb Al-Shorbaji, Torbjörn Fredriksson, and Raul Zambrano, senior staff members of WHO, UNCTAD, and UNDP respectively, and to Tim Unwin, now CEO of the Commonwealth Telecom- munications Organization, who took significant time from their busy schedules to serve voluntarily as authors, based upon their significant experience in their fields. The United Nations family has been involved in multiple aspects of ICT for development now for over 50 years, and remains an important player in this space. The knowledge, skill, and dedication of these people attest to the significant capability of their organizations in these areas. We wish to thank those many pioneers who, through foresight and hard work, created what we now know as the Internet. We wish to pay special tribute to Tim Berners-Lee, who took the idea of the World Wide Web to frui- tion and continues to guide its development in important ways. We truly stand on the shoulders of giants. With- out the imagination and the dedicated efforts of these people, this book could not possibly have been written. Very special thanks are due to the Rockefeller Foundation for quickly recognizing the importance of this subject and expressing a willingness to lead the funding responsible for the creation of this monograph. George Sadowsky
  7. 7. vii Foreword from the Rockefeller Foundation����������������������������������������������������������������������� i Foreword from the World Wide Web Foundation������������������������������������������������������������ iii Preface��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� v Executive Summary������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 1 Chapter Descriptions���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������2 Introduction.......................................................................................................................... 7 Prologue����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������7 Some History���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������8 The Current State of ICTs������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������11 Software for Support of Development�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������12 Who Are the Poor and Vulnerable?���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������14 The Digital Divide and Development�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������15 Governance and Empowerment��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������17 An Information Society?��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������18 Emergence of Internet Governance as an Issue�������������������������������������������������������������������������������19 Policy and Governance Issues with Regard to Effective Use of the Internet������������������������������������21 Chapter Descriptions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������22 Fundamental Access Issues�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 25 Introduction����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������25 Responding to the Broadband Imperative������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 25 The Evolving Broadband Ecosystem – A Conceptual Framework for Maximizing Internet Access����������������������������������������������������������� 26 Current Status and Trends in Internet Access�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������35 Toward Universal High-Speed Internet Access���������������������������������������������������������������������������������40 Institutional Roles in Maximizing Internet Access������������������������������������������������������������������������������42 National Governments and Regulators����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 42 Providers/Private Sector���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 43 Civil Society����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 43 Table of Contents
  8. 8. viii Development Community and Development Finance Institutions������������������������������������������������ 44 Some Outstanding Questions and Potential Research Topics����������������������������������������������������������44 Technical Access Issues�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 47 Introduction����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������47 Current State of Play�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������48 Controlling Factors������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 48 Technologies��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 51 Impediments to Progress�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 53 Current Work to Ameliorate Impediments������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������55 Important Gaps in Knowledge�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������57 Future Prospects and Promising Areas of Future Work��������������������������������������������������������������������58 Organizational Actors: Their Roles and Responsibilities�������������������������������������������������������������������59 Recommendations����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������60 Internet Access: Policy Issues for Persons with Disabilities�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 63 Introduction����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������63 What is at Stake for Web Users with Disabilities?������������������������������������������������������������������������� 63 What is Disability?������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 64 What Drives the Development of Public Policy for Ease of Use?�������������������������������������������������� 64 Current State of Play and Impediments to Progress�������������������������������������������������������������������������65 Availability������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 66 Affordability����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 68 Accessible Content on the Web���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 71 An Important Gap in Knowledge�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������74 Current Work to Address Impediments and Future Prospects����������������������������������������������������������74 UNCRPD Country Reports on Ease of Use����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 75 ITU Accessibility Resolution 175��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 75 Accessible ICT Standards and Procurement�������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 75 United States Accessible Web Legislative and Regulatory Activities������������������������������������������� 76 Public/Private Partnerships Impacting Web Ease of Use Policies������������������������������������������������ 76 Organizational Actors: Their Roles and Responsibilities�������������������������������������������������������������������78 Recommendations����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������78 Good/Democratic Governance����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 81 Introduction����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������81 Context����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������82 Millennium 2.0�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������82
  9. 9. ix New ICTs, Freedom and Equality������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������83 Role of the New ICTs in Democratic Governance�����������������������������������������������������������������������������84 Challenges Ahead�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������85 Concluding Remarks�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������86 Agriculture������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 87 Introduction����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������87 Problem���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������88 Agricultural Potential�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������88 Agricultural Experience���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������91 The ICT Challenge����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������94 ICTs and Learning�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������94 Key Actors�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������97 Gaps��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������99 Prospects����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������100 Emerging Issues������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������101 Recommendations��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������101 Health������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 103 Introduction��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������103 The Web������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������104 Electronic Publishing�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������105 Health on the Internet����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������105 Internet Uses and Services��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 106 Access to Health Information������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 106 e-LEARNING������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 108 Self-Medication and e-Pharmacies��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 109 Telemedicine������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 110 Mobile Health������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 111 Electronic Health Records����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 111 Patient Education and Safety������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 112 Quality of Health Information on the Internet������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 114 eHealth challenges��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������117 Conclusion���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������118 Education������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 119 Challenging Educational Norms: Wisdom from the Web?���������������������������������������������������������������119 Context: Educational Content and Communication in Development Practice���������������������������������120
  10. 10. x Applications: the Web of the Possible���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������124 Using the Web in Support of Unconnected Learners����������������������������������������������������������������� 124 Educational Content������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������125 Education and Communication��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 128 Globalizing and Localizing Education����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������129 A Web Awaiting Exploration�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������130 Commerce and Trade������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 131 What ICTs Can Do for Different Types of Enterprises���������������������������������������������������������������������131 ICT Use in the Evolving ICT Landscape������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������132 Impacts of ICT Use by Enterprises��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������137 Opportunities in the ICT Producing Sector��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������139 Some Implications for Policy�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������141 Finance����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 147 Introduction��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������147 Current Understanding and Evidence���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������148 M-transfers: evidence from M-PESA������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 148 M-transfers: other country evidence������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 149 M-payments and account-based services���������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 150 Impediments to Progress����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������152 Current Work by Organizational Actors to Ameliorate Impediments������������������������������������������������154 Important Gaps in Knowledge���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������156 Recommendations and Promising Areas of Future Work����������������������������������������������������������������157 Gender������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 159 Origins of the Concern for Gender Issues in the Internet and Information Society in Developing Countries���������������������������������������������������������������������������159 Do poor women need information technology? Can illiterate women use technology?����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 160 Rising Waters Do Not Lift All Boats��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 160 The Need for Gender Analysis���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 161 Challenges to Women Accessing and Using the Internet���������������������������������������������������������� 161 How can ICTs Serve Women and Development?���������������������������������������������������������������������������166 What do we mean by development for women?������������������������������������������������������������������������� 166 What can women gain from the Internet?������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 166 Content, Supply and Demand����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 168 Best Practices����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 168 What media do marginalized women in developing countries use?������������������������������������������� 169 What information and communication media/networks do poor women
  11. 11. xi in developing countries use?������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 169 Places of Use������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 170 Telecenters���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 170 ICTD: The shift from Telecenters to Mobiles�������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 172 Willingness to pay high costs for communication����������������������������������������������������������������������� 173 Economic and Social Development Benefits of Mobile Telephony for Women��������������������������� 173 Current Work to Ameliorate Impediments����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 175 GSMA- mobile corporate interests enter ICTD���������������������������������������������������������������������������� 175 New Developments�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������177 Combining mobile with the Web: more access, more information, more interactivity���������������� 177 Prospects and Promising Areas of Future Work������������������������������������������������������������������������������177 Low-cost phones������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 178 Positive, proactive programs for women and the Web��������������������������������������������������������������������178 Conclusions and Recommendations�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������181 Language and Content���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 183 Introduction��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������183 Current State of Play�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������185 Vignette��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 187 Impediments to Progress����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������191 Current Work to Ameliorate Impediments����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������192 Important Gaps in Knowledge���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������193 Future Prospects and Promising Areas of Future Work������������������������������������������������������������������194 Organizational Actors: Their Roles and Responsibilities�����������������������������������������������������������������194 Recommendations��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������196 Culture������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 197 Context��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������197 Elements of Cultural Expression�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������197 The Cultural Advent of the Internet��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������199 Issues in Internet Adoption��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������201 Access����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 202 Gender���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 202 Language������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 203 Modes of Communication����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 203 Taboos����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 203 Poverty���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 204 Government Interference������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 204 The Internet in Cultural Use������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������205 Language������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 205
  12. 12. xii The Market Place������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 206 Travel������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 207 Speech���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 208 Family������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 209 Social Media�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 210 Digital Culture������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 211 Internet Culture �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������213 Massive Multi-player Online Games- MMOGs���������������������������������������������������������������������������� 213 Movies����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 214 Sports������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 214 Music������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 215 Sex����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 215 Rise of open source and open technology��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 216 Fusion of cultures������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 216 What the Developing World Offers to the Internet���������������������������������������������������������������������������218 Recommendations��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������218 Access����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 218 Cultural Restrictions on Women�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 219 Literacy and Education��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 220 Free Software and Open Source Technology������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 220 Mobile Technology���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 220 Openness, Democracy and Good Governance������������������������������������������������������������������������� 220 The Internet as a Human Right���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 221 Life, Living, the Internet�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������221 Conclusion����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 223 Development and Growth����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������223 Current Trends and Directions��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������227 Chapter Summaries������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������231 References����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 251 Chapter 1 – Introduction������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������251 Chapter 2 – Fundamental Access Issues����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������251 Chapter 3 – Technical Access Issues����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������251 Chapter 4 – Policy Access Issues���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������252 Chapter 5 - Governance������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������253 Chapter 6 – Agriculture��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������253 Chapter 9 – Commerce and Trade��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������255 Chapter 10 – Finance����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������258 Chapter 11 – Gender�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������261
  13. 13. xiii Chapter 12 – Language and Content����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������266 Author Biographies��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 269
  14. 14. Executive Summary The overall purpose of the book Accelerating Development Using the Web: Empowering Poor and Marginal- ized Populations is to serve as a basis for discussion and contemporary outreach to broad range of communities involved in ICTs in the developing world. Structured to provide overviews of the major macro issues (access, capacity, standards), while also providing insights into specific business and public policy domains, the book unites themes of technological innovation, international development, economic growth, gender equality, lin- guistic and cultural diversity and community action, with special attention paid to the circumstances surround- ing the poor and vulnerable members of the Global Information Society. Taken as a whole, the work will be of value to policy makers, NGO staff members, foundations, private donors, and regional experts. It will also be of use to academics and members of civil society who are interested in progress in the least developed countries in the world. This book is naturally the sum of its parts, and as such, select chapters may also be of interest to doctors, nurses, and other health care workers in distant lands; agricul- tural professionals seeking to help farmers and small holders in the field; bankers, lenders, and micropayments specialists involved in finance and credit, gender, language and cultural researchers, technologists who may be taking an expansive survey of end user needs and practices; and even anthropologists and sociologists, who are working on the impact of ICTs on society. Further, the book offers useful information to inventors, social entrepreneurs and thought leaders who are fo- cused on global competiveness. As evidenced by the rapid rise of China and India in the high-tech industry, when we imagine a child accessing a web site for the first time in an LDC today, we know that he or she may be tomorrow’s high tech leader in the next BRIC nation. The subject of ICTs for development has many branches and complex connections between them. Though there are numerous books that tackle the main themes and address select problems individually, few books cover the material in an interdisciplinary manner. While a book of this length cannot delve into the topics in great depth, it offers a foundation in the following areas: • The policy, legal, regulatory, and financial frameworks that guide the use of ICTs in an international context. • The technical standards and design decisions that impact ease of use, availability, capacity, and applicability to consumer needs in both business and personal environments. • And finally the local structures and individual practices that enhance and reflect the end result of technology deployment – human interaction with ICTs for economic and social development. This book is focused on the use of these technological tools in achieving social and economic goals, and, as stated in the Preface, strives to highlight both their strengths and their limitations. Among several other obser- vations to that end, we acknowledge that the Web is a rich interoperable multimedia platform, but given the vast quantity of information available, the greatest question becomes one of access.
  15. 15. Accelerating Development Using the Web | Executive Summary2 Where in the industrial nations, we take connectivity and bandwidth more or less for granted, we must consider the numbers of poor and underserved individual and communities across the globe; for the long term, govern- ments, policy makers, and corporations must work together to ensure that technological access is guided by principles of social equality and the equitable distribution of information resources. Accelerating Development Using the Web: Empowering Poor and Marginalized Populations may serve to stimulate interactions within and across groups who are working on political, economic, health, education, agriculture, trade, and finance issues around the world and will add to the collection of work and actions that bridge the gaps between the public sector, private sector, and civil society. This book fills a gap in the current store of knowledge by taking a broad view, offering detailed commentary from fourteen experts who are deeply engaged in the field of ICTs for development, many with extensive ex- perience in LDCs, each able to emphasize the key questions, challenges, and successes unique to their field. While these authors speak of the fields with which they are most familiar, much of the commentary is structured in a way that enables the reader to draw parallels across the fields and see where there are similarities in the de- ployment of ICTs for development and where there are divergences. By taking holistic approach, the book pro- vides a unique body of material for those studying the current state of play across various economic domains. For the purpose of this Executive Summary, we will cover the material in brief, chapter by chapter, as it per- tains to the interesting findings, open questions, and possible directions that would be most important for senior policy-makers, NGO representatives, private sector interests, or even philanthropies to consider in future initia- tives and partnerships. Some of these observations are also noted in the Introduction and many are elaborated more fully in Chapter 14, Conclusions. As the reader will find, the book addresses these subjects with both macro- and microscopic perspectives. There are vignettes, statistics, personal anecdotes, and an ample supply of references for those seeking to look deeper in one area, or all of them. Above all, the book seeks to be relevant in many of the main ICT contexts today, from rural to urban, poor and vulnerable groups to emerging entrepreneurial classes, and from local to global. Chapter Descriptions Chapter 1 – Introduction provides an abbreviated history of ICTs and their application to development issues. Within the past 20 years, the notion of evolving toward an information or knowledge society has gained cre- dence, and has highlighted the inequities among population groups, regions and countries with respect to access to information resources, a situation often characterized as the digital divide. Such realizations culminated internationally in the United Nations’ World Summit on the Information Society in 2003 and 2005. The primary technologies making possible eventually the achievement of an information society and ubiquitous access to that information have been the Internet and the Web, so that the issue of Internet governance has be- come an important international political issue. It is therefore important to understand from structural, technical and administrative perspectives — as well as from a political perspective — how and where Internet gover- nance policy can be made so that it addresses effectively the needs of all Internet users, including users who are poor, underserved and otherwise marginalized. National industrial and regulatory policies have a very large impact on the direction and effectiveness of Internet use. This chapter explores the space of Internet policy decision making and the organizations that inhabit that space, and makes suggestions regarding those policies and the loci of their creation and implementation that would permit the Internet to grow and flourish best.
  16. 16. Accelerating Development Using the Web | Executive Summary 3 Chapter 2 – Fundamental Access Issues describes how Internet access is evolving, covering the major con- straints affecting access levels today and the measures that can be taken to ameliorate them, using a ‘broadband evolution conceptual framework to contextualize the factors and identify needs and roles. Without effective access, issues of interface and content are not meaningful. The bootstrapping process of connecting countries to the Internet has now been completed for all but some of the most remote island communities. However the situation within countries is quite different, as not all countries have yet extended Internet access to the majority of their inhabitants and broadband in many countries is only beginning to be deployed. In addition, the notion of effective access is being redefined as new technologies are developed and introduced. In particular, the rapid and explosive rollout of mobile telephony in almost all parts of the world has provided SMS capability worldwide. The introduction of “smart phones,” has offered an increasingly cost effective way of providing Internet access in wide swaths of rural areas where investment in fixed line capabilities is uneco- nomical. Internet and Web services can sometimes best be delivered through a combination of access methods. This chapter evaluates fundamental access across technological platforms and national contexts. Chapter 3 – Technical Access Issues focuses on the methods by which we interface with ICT-based services. Innovations, such as the use of pointing devices and finger and hand motions has eased the difficulty in learning how to exploit ICT devices by those previously disadvantaged and vulnerable, including the challenges faced by people with disabilities or who are illiterate. The more sophisticated assistive devices that previously relied heavily on increases in processing power, memory size and communications capabilities are becoming more common now, as technology has delivered those capabilities at lower cost. The rate of progress of the technolo- gies underlying these components continues to be rapid, and will be the basis for further improvements in user interfaces. However, usability is not an exact science. There are abundant guidelines and possible techniques for making things usable, but ultimately they must be validated by the experience of by real users. Users with minimal technology experience and those who have no desire to become technologically proficient are likely to be most affected by ease of use issues. Although this review includes a range of usability issues, a prime focus will be on those issues and technologies that can make Web access practical for those most challenged by usability. Chapter 4 - Internet Access: Policy Issues for Persons with Disabilities covers Internet access for persons with disabilities from policy, legal and practical perspectives. For the first time in history, the Web provides possibilities for users with disabilities to more fully participate in society and for society to be enriched by their diverse contributions. A Web strategy that accommodates the functionality needs of persons with disabilities, such as hearing, visual, cognitive and mobility disabilities means that many of the barriers that contribute to the disadvantages they experience can be avoided or reduced. Some of these disadvantages include: poor health outcomes; lower educational achievements; lower employment rates; higher rates of poverty; and not being able to live independently or participate fully in community activities. Unless ease of use and functionality is addressed for Web users with disabilities, they will most likely not benefit from Web initiatives supporting economic and social development. The impetus for increasing the ease and usefulness of interfaces comes both from public policy and technologi- cal considerations. Many countries of the world have adopted legislation to promote or require that interfaces take people with disabilities of various kinds into account. Industry associations also understand the value of interfaces that are easily used by people with various disabilities, and the World Wide Web Consortium has de- veloped and published guidelines for designing easily accessible Web sites within the limits of current technol- ogy. This chapter provides a thorough background on the methods and rationales for the various governmental activities in this direction.
  17. 17. Accelerating Development Using the Web | Executive Summary4 Chapters 5 through 10 address the uses of ICTs to assist progress in substantive core areas. For each area, the current status is described, as well as the impediments to progress and any current work done to break through those impediments. Chapter 5 – Governance in this context is defined as the exercise of political, economic and administrative authority to manage the affairs of a nation-state. Governance encompasses all of the processes, relationships and institutions through which citizens and stakeholders articulate their interests, exercise their rights and ob- ligations and mediate their differences. A key element of governance is thus the distribution of power among competing groups of actors and networks within a given national or international political environment. From the human development perspective, ‘good’ governance is democratic governance. Democratic gover- nance entails respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms where people also have a say in the decision and policy making processes that affect their lives. Principles such as transparency, accountability, responsive- ness and inclusive participation are core trademarks of democratic governance. There is substantial evidence that countries can have rapid economic growth without necessarily embracing good governance mechanisms and principles. In fact, it is quite feasible to have accelerated growth while both poverty and inequality increase, potentially leading to lower levels of human development overall. In recent decades, the concept of good governance has evolved to include a shift in system dynamics, where the process of globalization and the emergence of the Internet and new ICTs have played important roles. The spread of ICTs has helped to bring about good governance, and good governance has exploited ICTs to develop. Chapter 6 – Agriculture contends that the agricultural sector needs to be rejuvenated, especially for the vast majority of the rural poor dependent on it for their livelihoods. Improving information flow throughout the chain of production to market can bring in major gains. Today, the advancements in information and commu- nication technologies, highlighted most by the spectacular penetration of mobile phones, present an enormous opportunity to harness ICTs to aid agriculture. Bringing benefits of decentralization and widespread reach, these tools allow for customized solutions to spe- cific and diverse problems, as well as enhancing the effectiveness of global programmes, connecting old and new players, and helping to improve knowledge flows. With a focus on highlighting the importance of small holders in revitalizing agriculture and having a positive impact on rural poverty, this piece explores the possible ways in which ICTs can support this process. Chapter 7 – Health addresses the use of information and communication technology in health or eHealth. eHealth has been defined by WHO as “the cost-effective and secure use of information and communications technologies in support of health and health-related fields, including health-care services, health surveillance, health literature, and health education, knowledge and research”.1 This chapter will focus mainly on the use of Internet to support access to health information and health services. One central goal in this effort lies in en- abling and empowering individuals and organizations in the health care field from the most remote to the most urban locations through better access to and utilization of the vast store of health knowledge that is available through electronic means. Chapter 8 – Education focuses on the ways in which the Web can enhance access to educational information and facilitate communication in the context of lifelong learning, paying particular attention to the role of the Internet in distance education. For the Web to be used effectively in support of learning, five critical things need to be in place: 1 World Health Organization. WHA58.28 eHealth. http://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA58/WHA58_28-en.pdf

×