Linking Verbs
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Linking Verbs

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Linking Verbs Linking Verbs Presentation Transcript

  • Linking Verbs The great equals sign of sentences
  • Let’s Review
    • Action verbs tell us what the subject is doing
    • Action verbs sometimes have objects that receive the action of the subject
    • Action verbs can be found by asking the question, “ Can I…? ”
  • What Are Linking Verbs?
    • Linking verbs act as an equals (=) sign in the sentence.
    • The subject is not doing anything. Instead, it is or is like something else in the sentence
    • Linking verbs tell us that the subject has a word in the predicate that renames it (a noun) or describes it (an adjective)
    • In other words, they are equal
  • Examples of Linking Verbs
    • Linking verbs include the forms of the verb to be
      • is, am , was, were, are, be, being, been
    • Linking verbs are also related to the senses
      • tastes, smells, looks, feels, sounds, seems, and more
  • Linking Verbs in Action
    • Get ready for some sentences that use linking verbs
    • In each, I’ll add arrows that show which words are linked, or equal, in the sentence
  • Linking Verbs in Action Mr. Childers is the nicest teacher in the school. Here is the linking verb Mr. Childers is the subject
  • Linking Verbs in Action Mr. Childers is the nicest teacher in the school. Think of the linking verb as an equals (=) sign
  • Linking Verbs in Action Mr. Childers is the nicest teacher in the school. Mr. Childers equals what? Teacher is a noun in the predicate that renames the subject, so we call it a predicate nominative
  • Important Note!
    • A linking verb will always have a word in the predicate that it links to the subject
    • Always
    • Yes, always
    • Let’s see how linking verbs work in some sentences
  • Linking Verbs in Action The trees are beautiful in the fall. Linking Verb Subject Predicate Adjective The verb are links an adjective in the predicate with the subject
  • Linking Verbs in Action The play was exciting. Linking Verb Subject Predicate Adjective The verb was links an adjective in the predicate with the subject
  • Linking Verbs in Action It seemed like a good idea at the time. Linking Verb Subject Predicate Adjective The verb seemed links a noun in the predicate with the subject
  • You Try It!
    • I’ll give you a sentence and you find the linking verb
    • You will need to use your mouse pointer to click on the word of your choice, so move your mouse around now to make sure you can see it.
    • Ready?
    • Go!
  • You Try It! Ice cream is my favorite dessert.
  • YES!
  • Oh NO!
  • You Try It! This water tastes funny.
  • YES!
  • Oh NO!
  • You Try It! The report cards were terrible.
  • YES!
  • Oh NO!
  • You Try It! That couple seems pleasant.
  • YES!
  • Oh NO!
  • You Try It! We were delirious with joy!
  • YES!
  • Oh NO!
  • Need Another Clue
    • There is a way to find out if the word you are looking at is a linking verb or not
    • Are you ready to find out what it is?
    • It’s kind of sneaky
    • Sure you’re ready?
  • Substitution
    • If you can substitute is , am , or are for the word you think is a linking verb, and the sentence still makes sense…you are probably right!
    • Let’s try that before we quit
  • Is, Am, Are
    • Here is a sentence
    The pie smells delicious If we think smells is a linking verb, let’s substitute one of our words and see if it still makes sense
  • Is, Am, Are
    • Here is a sentence
    The pie is delicious The sentence still makes sense, so smells is a linking verb
  • Is, Am, Are
    • Now let’s try one that doesn’t work
    The meatloaf smells like it is overcooked. We still have smells as a verb Let’s substitute again
  • Is, Am, Are The meatloaf is like it is overcooked. This time is doesn’t make sense, so the verb is not a linking verb
  • Let’s Re-Cap
    • Linking verbs act as equal (=) signs between a noun in the subject and a noun or adjective
    • Linking verbs do NOT show action
    • Linking verbs tell us that something is or is like something else
    • We can substitute is, am, or are to see if a verb is linking