Adobe Flash Platform Summit 2010

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  • Over 5000 enterprises across industries.

    Adobe is the choice for large enterprises to deliver mission-critical solutions. The customer is looking for others in their industry, so it's always a good idea to have a good handle on the different customers in your region.
  • Adobe has a strong enterprise focus, not only selling software – larger accounts are working with us. Adobe is involved in massive projects with technical profice at every step. Give work to partners, to make them successful. (adobe not becoming an SI)

    Adobe is the choice for large enterprises to deliver mission-critical solutions.
    Work with most of the world’s leading user experience and design firms

    connect, livecycle, flash builder

  • Beginning of flash targeting animation, gamers.
    New market field: now targeting enterprise developers too, that’s why flex was created.

    Flash started as a vector graphics animation technology
    Over time Flash Platform innovation has enabled, created and revolutionized business over the internet
    The current revolution is about large scale RIAs in the enterprise
    Partners: Deloitte, Cognizant, TCS, and CapGemini
  • Integration with existing systems
    Much of the data of value to organizations has been collected over the years by existing enterprise information systems. Much of the programming investment resides in applications on those same systems. The challenge for developers of enterprise applications is how to reuse and commoditize these existing information assets.
    To achieve this goal, application developers need standard ways to access middle-tier and back-end services such as database management systems and transaction monitors.

    Security
    More than ever, information systems security is on the minds of IT managers and system architects. That's because protecting information assets to maximize their value can jeopardize that very value. Traditionally, IT departments have been able to maintain a relatively high level of control over the environment of both servers and clients. When information assets are exposed in less-protected environments, it becomes increasingly important to maintain tight security over the most sensitive assets, while allowing seemingly unencumbered access to others.
    One of the difficulties in integrating disparate systems is providing a unified security model. Single sign on across internal application for instance is important to creating a positive user experience with the applications. Security needs to be compatible with existing mechanisms.
  • Gap between final user and developers!
    Difference of culture

    Depending on the organisation sometimes business has the problem, sometime IT: Some companies are very IT oriented, have the latest release of software but don’t care about the users.
    Don’t allow users to use what they want to use because of security.

    Other kind of companies are led by marketing or business -> more focus on the end user
  • Yahoo story:
    Back in 2000 was the no 1 search engine
    Ask audience: Do you remember what was the user experience?
    -> first success of google was due to good user experience, search was fast (not good algorythm)
  • When you break it down, an intuitive user experience has a variety of characteristics:

    Effective – supports goal accomplishment
    Efficient – allows rapid task completion
    Engaging – Offers enjoyable day-to-day operation
    Easy to learn – supports rapid initial skill aqusition and expanded skill development with experience
    Error free – prevents errors and supports error recovery

    And to support these 5 E’s, it has to be personalised, enable the user to collaborate with others in the context of the task at hand, all while completely abstracting and automating all backend processes.
  • RIAs are the critical innovation opportunity for enterprises to transform experience.

    VERIZON Wireless
    Answer the strategic challenge of iTunes with a combination of Flash/Flex/AIR/LiveCycle project:
    Boosted revenues with a 40% increase in ringtone and 15% increase in ringback tones sales upon launch of new flash-based site
    Improved customer experience with highly interactive web site that makes it easy for customers to browse items online and quickly purchase products
    Achieved first-to-market MP3 download capabilities and one-stop music shopping experience through online media store
  • Reduce costs
  • Reduce costs
  • Compare to Silverlight – big fuzz
  • Increase revenue
  • Old: server-side new: wanted to build RIA for maintenance reasons.
    Answer: we can do the same using flex.
    Comparing values

    This shows a spreadsheet, where client thought the solution was to build a “spredsheet in Flex”. Spending time with traders understanding the key data they act upon, it’s possible to create a more effective trader-centric solution that supports faster, less-error prone decision making.

    Help people understand “the anatomy of great user experience” by talking about the concepts and principles of a good user experience

    Help people understand how ROI is unlocked through user-centric design
  • Without changing anything on the backend using exactly the same services, Adobe redefined the user experience.
    Adobe transformed DATA into Information.
    The traders who used to take 5-6 minutes (average time) to make a decision, today takes 15-20 seconds.

    Increased productivity
    Increase end user productivity through simple, personalized, highly repsonsive and consistent user experience.

    Improved decision making
    * Make faster decisions through aggregating relevant, timely information from multiple sources
  • Dark blue: the price you sell to customers
    Light blue: price now, for next 24 hours
  • We’ve seen applications move through four phases, and we’re currently in the midst of the rich internet application phase. It’s the fist time we’ve managed to accomplish rich applications with reach.

    Client/server web revolution caused a loss of end user functionality (was forced to reduce end user capabilities in favour of easiness of distribution)

    Adobe invented the term RIA. We’ve focused on them for over four years and most of the really compelling RIAs are built using the Adobe technology platform.

    There are others venturing the space, but they are both adopting our language and replacing our functionality. Adobe, in the meantime, is innovating and expanding the scope of rich internet applications.
  • As enterprises create new business processes and improve existing ones, increasingly they will face pressure to deliver these processes as user-centric applications that offer the types of intuitive experiences we’re all experiencing in our lives as consumers (iPhone, social networking etc.).

    Contrasting the contrast system-centric applications with user-centric applications, you can see a new and different set of requirements are emerging. We are well placed in many of these dimensions and continue to innovate to deliver better than any other company on the vision of user-centric computing.
  • Long and painful development cycles. User is involved at the end of the process. The presentation steps start after backend steps.

    Roles: design, business layer, presentation layer
    Functional and technical specifications from the design
    Guarantee user adoption
  • Productivity:
    Line of business and IT departments expect shorter development times, ability to customize, adapt and maintain
    Customers in the enterprise today assume that software solutions deliver productivity as a given (reduce costs & processes, shorten development times etc.). To even be considered, you have to deliver productivity at a base level. But this is not sufficient- everyone delivers productivity. Customers expect more from their applications…

    Collaboration:
    To take enterprises to the “modern era” software companies need to connect people in the context of business processes and map to the way people work today. They need to deliver more social work solutions that increase collaboration.

    Consumerization:
    the whole phenomenon around consumerization revolves around users expecting more from their enterprise applications. To “delight the customer” needs to be at the center of enriching the end-user experience through enhanced collaboration.

    The failure of system centric approach to these types of applications was no fault of IT. Frankly it was too hard, too costly and they were constrained by the complexity of the client technologies (SAP gui, Siebel gui, etc.) which were hard to change and difficult to extend -- not to mention the challenges associated with customizing the apps to support unique business processes.

    So it was up to the employee to get trained on the systems and then toggle btw screens, aggregate information manually and wait for IT to make the needed system updates.

    Now designers are working hand in hand with the development teams –and a new level of experience is available to enterprise. Enterprise software has to deliver on user expectations, with the same level of intuitiveness & usability people experience on consumer based sites.

    User-centric processes are collaborative by their very nature, and enterprises are looking for ways to provide better services by connecting people from within the application – be that instant messaging, sharing screens or fully integrated video connectivity inside and outside your organization.
  • How have we gotten here?
    Client/server web revolution caused a loss of end user functionality (was forced to reduce end user capabilities in favour of easiness of distribution) and now end users want the functionality back.

    Same forces driving consumerisation of IT trends.
    User expectations have changed
    Demographics of enterprise is changing
    Rapidly changing business models

    Desire to extend existing IT infrastructure investments to more users
    Occasional use of applications – must be easy to use or they will never be used
    The extended enterprise of customers and partners simply won’t use difficult apps
    Enterprise software architecures don’t translate to intuitive user experience
    Software developers looking for tooling that supports rapid application evolution

    Technical challenges of traditional enterprise UI approaches
    Web has become preferred app distribution method for management reasons
    Data centric design techniques don’t prioritise usability first
    HTML/JS/AJAX applications are costly to maintain & lack enterprise preferred object-oriented coding techniques
  • First business applications where you will use RIAs



  • RIAs which support and assist decision making.

    A simple, intuitive user experience which aggregates a single screen information from different systems to enable faster decision.
    Information displayed visually is always easier than large Excel spreadsheet and it is no coincidence that the biggest players in business intelligence have turned to Adobe technologies, namely the Flash platform to meet these needs


  • The third type of application, relates to eCommerce and online sales.
    Select products, media players

  • The last type of application, the "Social" and collaborative - and here we find the ability to integrate Web 2.0 technonolgies in enterprise applications

    Twitter clients
    Facebook games


  • Mosaik
    Assemble intuitive, personalized and highly productive applications through a composite RIA framework

    LCCS
    Build real-time, multi-user collaboration into existing or new rich Internet applications

    DataServices
    Improve the performance and simplify the development and integration of your RIA application with backend systems
  • Process behind enterprise RIAs

    The reason for Process Management being the bridge in this diagram is to show that the differentiator between consumer RIAs and enterprise RIAs is that there is always a process behind enterprise RIAs
  • The reason for Process Management being the bridge in this diagram is to show that the differentiator between consumer RIAs and enterprise RIAs is that there is always a process behind enterprise RIAs
  • Dark blue: the price you sell to customers
    Light blue: price now, for next 24 hours
  • Adobe Flash Island allows you to create rich Internet components that support integration, data exchange, and interaction with applications built with Web Dynpro for ABAP .

    The Web Dynpro framework provides UI elements that dramatically reduce development effort and enforce a unified look and feel of Web Dynpro-based applications.
    However, several use cases require richer UI capabilities that are not available with this set of UI elements.
    To support such use cases, Adobe Flash Island is supported within the Web Dynpro for ABAP framework in SAP NetWeaver 7.0 EhP1.
  • Reduced development effort
    Missing functionality
    data management
    Real-time messaging
    Performance issues
    Rendering of XML in flash player
    network traffic and SAP system load
    high volume of users
  • Improved data management
    Framework for data handling between RIA and bacakend SAP system
    Based on CRUD (create, read, update, delete)
    Increased performance
    Optimized protocol between RIA client and RIA server
    Integration with Enterprise security infrastructure
    Real-time messaging based on push mechanisms
    PDF generation
  • Call center application – for handling customer calls
    A Flex-based application that sits upon a myriad of Adobe enterprise systems, including our CRM implementation and our Dylan product catalogue and order placement engine.

    Not a product that can be sold to customers, nor a solution accelerator.
    It is however a great example of what is possible and a great example of how to use our technology
    Has not been designed with re-use in mind
  • Enterprise software architecures don’t translate to intuitive user experience
  • We took a good look at the different tasks that the agents had to perform on a daily basis
  • We noticed that there was much room for improvment in some of these processes.
    Typically, most processes were tied to the systems, meaning that a process would have to adapt itself to how a system worked and not the other way round
    The steps in the processes were often too long and too complicated, demanding the agent to switch between different systems and different user interfaces
    There was too much room for error between all of the systems that the agents were having to use- they were having to manually copy and paste data from one system to another
    There were band aids. By band aids, I mean there were processes conceived years ago, and to adapt an old process to new requirements, additional steps were included, making it even more complex
    These processes had not been entirely re-thought.
  • And finally we looked at the systems themselves.
    An agent had to typically use a dozen different systems throughout their daily work schedule.
    This is a screenshot of one of them: CRM
  • Agents had many complaints about the systems they had to use, but the system they disliked the most was CRM
    CRM was slow, it crashed a lot and there were regular time out issues, meaning that agents would often lose work
    There was no progressive disclosure- all of the functionality was displayed and was not filtered depending on an agent’s role or step within a particular process
    There was little information hierarchy- data was presented at the same visual level, meaning that quickly scanning a screen to find something was very difficult
    There was no data visualization to help agents quickly understand a given situation- just text and forms
    And call-to-action items: buttons, drop down lists, navigation links etc. were very small, hard to detect and dotted all around the interface.
  • Our conclusion therefore was that agents had too many tools and were having to memorize too many processes
  • First thing we had to address was the processes.
    We took data from the process documents and training manuals, and plotted it out into a huge process map, so that we could take a global look at all of the different steps, actions and systems that the agents were having to use
  • For a given task, we were then able to plot different user paths over the process map
  • And then we were able to understand how we could eventually optimize certain processes, creating shortcuts, deleting steps and essentially compressing the time need to complete any given task.
  • Once we had gained a better picture about how we were going to improve processes, we could then start to create the user interface.
    The first step in creating an interface is the wireframing phase
    This is an essential phase as it allows a designer to rapidly create a multitude of different scenarios and user paths without thinking about the visual design (these are often in monochrome)
    Very early on, designers will then test these different scenarios on real users. The fact that the wireframes are basic monochrome mock-ups means that users will concentrate on functionality rather than aesthetic appeal and this will glean important feedback about the functionality before the visual design stage
  • Once the wireframes have been approved by users, business and project stake holders, they are then transformed into a visual design
    A visual designer will use colour, iconography, layout and choreography to create visual hierarchy and visual cues within an interface, bringing to the forefront the elements that the user needs at any given moment.
    A prototype was also produced, allowing for a real sense of how the application would appear under a set of different scenarios.
    The visual design mock-ups were approved by users, business and project stake holders before passing off to the development team.
  • Long and painful development cycles. User is involved at the end of the process. The presentation steps start after backend steps.

    Roles: design, business layer, presentation layer
    Functional and technical specifications from the design
    Guarantee user adoption
  • Dark blue: the price you sell to customers
    Light blue: price now, for next 24 hours
  • Adobe Flash Platform Summit 2010

    1. 1. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Anne Kathrine Petteroe | Enterprise Platform Evangelist Rich Internet Applications for the Enterprise
    2. 2. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Agenda  Challenges of enterprise application development  Why Intuitive User Experiences matter?  Rich Internet Applications, the technical answer  Adobe LiveCycle RIA Services and SAP integration 2
    3. 3. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Adobe Enterprise Overview 3
    4. 4. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Adobe In the Enterprise 4
    5. 5. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Adobe In The Enterprise Adobe enterprise solutions are in use at:  22 of the top 25 global companies  7 of the top 10 global banks  24 of the top 25 global insurance companies  All 10 of the world’s largest publicly traded companies 5
    6. 6. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Adobe Flash: Giving Rise to New Businesses 6
    7. 7. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Challenges of Enterprise Application Development 7
    8. 8. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Challenges of Enterprise Application Development  Integration with existing systems  How to reuse and commoditize existing information assets  Standard ways to access middle-tier and back-end services  Maintaining security  Providing a unfied security model across systems / SSO for user experience  Late adopters of new technology  IE6  Logic and data not separated on back-end systems 8
    9. 9. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Project owner Project supervisor Design Specifications Marketing Customer relationship Technical specifications Data model IT production Development Final user Developers “Business” “IT” The Enterprise Love Story
    10. 10. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 10 Despite advances in IT, most enterprises still have the same basic problem: Making sound business decisions requires complete, contextual and accurate data visualized in a manner that makes sense to the line-of- business owner. Duane Nickull, Author “Web 2.0 Architectures”, O’Reilly
    11. 11. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. SAP 11
    12. 12. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. What Are Intuitive User Experiences? 12
    13. 13. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Simplicity 13
    14. 14. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. What Are Intuitive User Experiences?  Effective, Efficient, Engaging, Easy to Learn, Error Free  Personalized experiences across devices and channels  Communication and collaboration in context  Harmonization of backend processes and services 14
    15. 15. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Rich User Experiences: Why does it matter? Reduce Costs 15 Increase Revenue
    16. 16. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Fedex  FEDEX Desktop: • Delivered same customer experience online and offline • Enabled easy-to-use, always-on branded tracking method • Shared 45% of web tracking code for Adobe AIR application • Increased development productivity by nearly 50% 16
    17. 17. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Orange  Orange eCare Portal • Portal for customer care • Orange works with Adobe for more than two years to integrate rich components and create engaging UX on the customer portal • Customers can find answers to their questions more easily and in a faster way • Orange has a ROI of 19 million euros in two years because finiding answers on the website is less expensive than calling the hotline or going to a physcial branch 17
    18. 18. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. CCTV CCTV International Networks Co. Ltd. Is China’s primary television broadcaster.  During the Olympics in China: • Delivered thousands of hours of coverage reliability • Handled more than 832 million visits and 46.6 million VOD requests • Offered reliable, hassle-free playback while maintaining exceptional quality 18
    19. 19. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Verizon Wireless  VERIZON Wireless • Combination of Flash/Flex/AIR/LiveCycle project • Boosted revenues with a 40% increase in ringtone sales. • Improved customer experience with highly interactive web site that makes it easy for customers to browse items online and quickly purchase products 19
    20. 20. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Rich User Experiences: Opportunities for Internal Users 20 A Problem can’t be solved with the same thinking that created it
    21. 21. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Rich User Experience: Opportunities for Internal Users 21 5 mins 20 secs Increase productivity & improve decision making
    22. 22. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. DEMO 22
    23. 23. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Users View of the World Outside “The Firewall” 23
    24. 24. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. SAP – Purchase Order 24
    25. 25. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Rich Internet Application 25
    26. 26. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Applications In the Enterprise 26 Global Local REACH MAINFRAME CLIENT/SERVER 1992 1998 2004 WEB APPLICATIONS RICH INTERNET APPLICATION
    27. 27. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. From System-Centric to User-Centric Applications 27
    28. 28. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Design/Dev iterations Presentation Layer Services exposure Business layer Definition Delivery Long and painful development cycles. User is involved at the end of the process. The presentation steps start after backend steps. 60% of IT applications fail because of poor user adoption. CLASSIC IT development cycle (system-centric apps) Services exposure Business layer Definition Delivery Roles: design, business layer, presentation layer Functional and technical specifications from the design Guarantee user adoption OPTIMIZED RIA development cycle (user-centric apps) USERS Design/Users iterations Presentation Layer Design/Dev iterations USERS USERS
    29. 29. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. From System-Centric to User-Centric Applications  Productivity  Shorter development time  Customize, adapt, maintain  Collaboration in context of business processes  Connecting people  Consumerization  Higher expectations 29
    30. 30. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Enterprise RIA Adoption: Table Stakes  End user demanding more – demographics changing  IT demands easy path to leverage existing infrastructure investments  Ease of use  Rapidly changing business models  Developers demand productive, maintanable development model 30
    31. 31. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Families of RIA – Business Applications 31 Migration Mainframe & C/S Salesforce, SAP Online / Offline
    32. 32. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Families of RIA – Decision Making 32 Business Intelligence Advanced DataViz Real Time Single screen of information from different systems
    33. 33. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Families of RIA – eCommerce and Rich Media 33 Media Player Marketing Campaign Product Selector Online sales, media players, product selectors
    34. 34. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Families of RIA – Social Networks 34 Chat, Webcam, Video Widgets Collaborative Applications Web 2.0 technologies & collaboration
    35. 35. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Adobe LiveCycle RIA Services and SAP integration 35
    36. 36. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Adobe LiveCycle RIA Services LiveCycle Mosaic ES Assemble intuitive, personalized and highly productive applications through a composite RIA framework LiveCycle Collaboration Service Build real-time, multi-user collaboration into existing or new rich Internet applications LiveCycle Data Services ES Improve the performance and simplify the development and integration of your RIA application with backend systems
    37. 37. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 37
    38. 38. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 38
    39. 39. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Options to Integrate Flash/Flex with SAP applications  Flex apps connecting via XML  Flex apps connecting to SAP via SOAP or REST  Flex apps connecting to SAP via LiveCycle Data Services  Web Dynpro Flash Islands 39
    40. 40. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. SAP – Database Analysis 40
    41. 41. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. SAP – System Log 41
    42. 42. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. DEMO 42
    43. 43. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. SAP Flex Running In Browser 43
    44. 44. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. SAP – RIA Desktop Application 44
    45. 45. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. SAP Flash Islands  Create rich internet components that support integration, data exchange and interaction with applications built with Web Dynpro for ABAP 45
    46. 46. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. SAP Flash Islands 46
    47. 47. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. SAP Flash Islands 47
    48. 48. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. DEMO 48
    49. 49. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Direct Connections between SAP and Flex/AIR 49
    50. 50. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Direct connections between SAP and Flex/AIR  Why is XML/SOA not always the best solution? 50
    51. 51. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. LiveCycle Data Services  Improved Data Management  Most efficient framework for data handling between RIA Client, RIA Server and backend SAP system  Based on CRUD, as is the SAP Enterprise Services approach  Increased Performance  Optimized protocol between RIA Client and RIA Server  Integration with Enterprise security infrastructure  Real-time messaging based on push mechanism  PDF generation
    52. 52. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Hendrix 52
    53. 53. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Architecture – Adobe Hendrix Call Center Application 53 SAP CRM Flash Player : Flex Application LiveCycle Data Services Spring JBOSS CTI GENESYS TSERVER Phone A M F / H T T P S PBX V O I P J C O T c p / i p
    54. 54. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 54 Physical Architecture BPX LoadBalancer BPX BI (cluster/group) Server 3.1 Server 3.2 Server 3.3 … Server 3.p ECC (cluster/group) Server 2.1 Server 2.2 Server 2.3 … Server 1.m CRM (cluster/group) Server 1.1 Server 1.2 Server 1.3 … Server 1.n SAP TServer Server 2.1 … Server 1.m AIL Server Server 1.1 … Server 1.n Genesys CTI BPXBPX Hendrix JBoss LCDS Cluster Server 1.2 ... User CTI Phone User Desktop Internet Browser Flash Player Hendrix Flash Application Adobe CPS Content Publishing System Adobe Dylan ColdFusion Product Catalog VOIP AIL - RMI - TCP/IP AMF / HTTPS RSS / HTTPS JCO - JNI – TCP/ IP Server 1.3 ... Server 1.n AMF / HTTPS FIREWAL L FIREWAL L Web Method Batch EAI
    55. 55. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 55 Where was Adobe technology used? BPX LoadBalancer BPX BI (cluster/group) Server 3.1 Server 3.2 Server 3.3 … Server 3.p ECC (cluster/group) Server 2.1 Server 2.2 Server 2.3 … Server 1.m CRM (cluster/group) Server 1.1 Server 1.2 Server 1.3 … Server 1.n SAP TServer Server 2.1 … Server 1.m AIL Server Server 1.1 … Server 1.n Genesys CTI BPXBPX Hendrix JBoss LCDS Cluster Server 1.2 ... User CTI Phone User Desktop Internet Browser Flash Player Hendrix Flash Application Adobe CPS Content Publishing System Adobe Dylan ColdFusion Product Catalog AMF / HTTPS Server 1.3 ... Server 1.n AMF / HTTPS FIREWA L FIREWAL L VOIP AIL - RMI - TCP/IP RSS / HTTPS JCO - JNI – TCP/ IP Web Method Batch EAI
    56. 56. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. The Discovery Phase 56
    57. 57. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. The Discovery Phase 57 Unnecessary steps Too much room for error Too many steps, processes too long Process was tied to the systems Too many different systems Too many band-aids
    58. 58. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 58
    59. 59. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 59 No progressive disclosure No data visualization Poor information architecture Tiny buttons, no keyboard shortcuts Very slow, crashes all the time
    60. 60. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. What We Found 60 The processes SNS C SUI CTI/Genesys LWS Unlocking UPS 1. Find SKU 2. Enter payment details 3. Check billing address 4. Check delivery address 5. Order confirmation 1. Check elligibility, register previous product, if purchase is from reseller, POP needs to be sent 2. Find upgrade SKU 3. Order new product 4. Check billing address 5. Check delivery address 6. Escalate for validation by tier 1 senior 7. Order confirmation 1. Check elligibility 2. Find product 3. Order new product 4. Check billing address 5. Check delivery address 6. Take payment details 7. Order confirmation 1. Find the original order 2. Register orginal PSN 3. Enter serial number in serial number issuer 4. Give reason for reserialisation and register PSN 5. Cancel old PSN and remove from contracts 6. Adds SN to DNR server 1. Send TOL form to customer 2. Status “Pending Customer Action”, awaiting the TOL form to be returned. 3. When CS receives the completed TOL form: 4. Attaches it to the case 5. Transfer from original owner to the new owner 6. Email sent to original and new owner that TOL has been completed ESD returns 1. Register serial number 2. Check elligibility (within 30 days, purchase from direct) 3. Create RMA number (returns number) 4. Send LOD by email 5. Customer sends back digitally signed LOD 6. Case delegated to a Tier 1 CS agent 7. Agent checks LOD, disables serial number and escalates to Senior 8. Senior releases RMA to trigger payment 1. Find CRM Delivery N° 2. Find UPS Shipping Tracking N° 3. Enter N° in UPS website Shrink Wrap returns 1. Register serial number 2. Check elligibility (within 30 days, purchase from direct) 3. Create RMA number (returns number) 4. Disable serial number 5. For free uplift: Uplift arranged 6. Customer sends software with RMA to warehouse 7. Warehouse receives product, releases RMA and funds automatically sent to customer Fedex Notepad Outlook Kana Knova CRM The tools
    61. 61. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Turning Vision Into Reality Process Map 61
    62. 62. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 62
    63. 63. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Optimize Processes 63
    64. 64. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 64
    65. 65. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 65
    66. 66. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. Design/Dev iterations Presentation Layer Services exposure Business layer Definition Delivery Long and painful development cycles. User is involved at the end of the process. The presentation steps start after backend steps. 60% of IT applications fail because of poor user adoption. CLASSIC IT development cycle (system-centric apps) Services exposure Business layer Definition Delivery Roles: design, business layer, presentation layer Functional and technical specifications from the design Guarantee user adoption OPTIMIZED RIA development cycle (user-centric apps) USERS Design/Users iterations Presentation Layer Design/Dev iterations USERS USERS
    67. 67. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. DEMO 67
    68. 68. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.

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