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Iit kgp quiz club 2

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Set of questions presented at the IIT-KGP Quiz Club on 11/10/2012

Set of questions presented at the IIT-KGP Quiz Club on 11/10/2012

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  • Biz
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • MELA
  • Sport
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • Sport
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • Biz
  • Biz
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • IIT KGP Quiz Club – 2/08/2012
  • Transcript

    • 1. •Uses of this phrase (A) dating back to the 1930s and 1940shave been found, but the phrases first appearance isunknown.• The ‗____ _____‘ (B) in the saying refers to the nineteenthcentury practice in American bars of offering a ‗_________‘(B) as a way to entice drinking customers.•The phrase and its acronym are central to Robert Heinleins1966 novel The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, whichpopularized it.•The free-market economist Milton Friedman alsopopularized the phrase by using it as the title of a 1975 book,and it often appears in economics textbooks.Id the phrase (A).
    • 2. • ______ journalism presents little or no legitimate well-researched news and instead uses eye-catching headlines tosell more newspapers.•The term ______ journalism came from a popular a comicpublished in Joseph Pulitzer‘s New York World called"Hogans Alley," which featured a character named the "the______ kid." Determined to compete with Pulitzers World inevery way, rival New York Journal owner William RandolphHearst copied Pulitzers sensationalist style of reporting andeven hired "Hogans Alley" artist R.F. Outcault away from theWorld. In response, Pulitzer commissioned anothercartoonist to create a second ______ kid.•Soon, the sensationalist press of the 1890s became acompetition between the ―______ kids― and thus the term.
    • 3. • Ask the people of a certain segment of researchers why thisthing is possible, and the first response you get is, ―The BerlinPatient‖.•That patient is a wiry, 46-year-oldAmerican from Seattle named TimothyRay Brown and is something of a rockstar for those researchers as he has madehimself completely available to them andthey regularly bleed and biopsy him tolearn as much as possible from him. "Ihave sort of a guilt feeling about being the only person in theworld…," Brown said in an interview with NPR and said thathe did so to dispel this guilt.What happened to Timothy Brown, while living in Berlin,that has made him so famous in scientific circles?
    • 4. •Named for a cephalopod, this technique was usedextensively in a 1996 drama that starred Vincent d‘Onofrioas the creator of Conan the Barbarian, The Whole WideWorld.•Krzysztof Kieślowski‘s The Double Life of Véronique, Larsvon Trier‘s The Element of Crime, and Wim Wenders‘ Wingsof Desire are three of the most famous movies to employ it.Haskell Wexler made use of it in Bound for Glory, as didConrad Hall in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.•Picasso‘s Guernica can also be said to have used thistechnique to some extent. What ?
    • 5. According to the Urban Dictionary, this is defined as ‗A phenomenon where, in a landscape of office cubicles, anumber of people stand up to look around over the tops ofthe cube walls. Usually an unexpected/loud noise or verbalexchange will cause the curious to rise like ______out oftheir holes‘. What is this that takes it‘s name from an animalwhich displays similar behaviour ?
    • 6. ―As he told her that he loved her she gazed into his eyes,wondering, as she noted the infestation of eyelash mites, thetiny deodicids burrowing into his follicles to eat the greasysebum therein, each female laying up to 25 eggs in a singlefollicle, causing inflammation, whether the eyes are truly thewindows of the soul; and, if so, his soul needed regrouting.‖What?
    • 7. ••
    • 8. •_______ ____ is a Latin phrase loosely translated as"Remember your mortality‖. It refers to a genre of artworksthat vary widely but which all share the same purpose: toremind people of their mortality.•Popular belief says the phrase originated in ancient Rome:As a Roman general was parading through the streets duringa victory triumph, standing behind him was his slave, whoreminded the general that, although at his peak today,tomorrow he could fall, or — more likely — be broughtdown with the warning, " _______ ____ ".• However, this phrase entered popular consciousness in theearly 2000s for entirely different reasons.What phrase ?
    • 9. Abstruse Goose comic. What is being described here?
    • 10. The ________Cup was a club competition contested annuallyby the most recent winners of all European domestic cupcompetitions. The first competition was held in 1960–61 butit was not recognised by UEFA until two years later. The finaltournament was held in 1998–99, after which it wasabsorbed by the UEFA Cup. Prior to its abolition, it wasregarded as the second most prestigious European clubcompetition behind the UEFA Champions League. Barcelonahold the record for the maximum number of wins (4). FITB,naturally.
    • 11. •____ ______ is a village in the AdirondackMountains in Essex County, New York, United States. As ofthe 2000 census, the village had a population of 2,638.•It is best known as the two-time site of the Winter Olympicswhich it first hosted in 1932 and again 48 years laterin 1980. The village is especially remembered as the site ofthe 1980 USA–USSR hockey game, the so-called "Miracle onIce―.•Some people, however, would associate the place with aUTV-Action style movie that has spawned sequels andprequels galore with the latest having released in Septemberthis year. What is the name of this villlage ?
    • 12. House of Cards is an upcoming American politicaldrama television series created by Kevin Spacey and DavidFincher. The series stars Kevin Spacey in the lead and will bebased on a BBC miniseries of the same name. The reboot willtake place in the United States and will be producedby Media Rights Capital. The original BBC version was basedon a novel from British author Michael Dobbs, exploring the"ruthless underside of British politics at the end ofthe Thatcher era.‖What is special about this upcoming show?
    • 13. In the 400m heats in London 1908, Scottish athleteWyndham Halswelle won through to the final, setting a newOlympic record of 48.4 seconds in his heat, where he linedup against three American runners. As Halswelle moved topass the race leader it appeared that another of theAmericans blocked the Scot, running diagonally and forcinghim to the edge of the track. Although the practice ofblocking was permitted by the American athletics federation,it was most definitely not allowed in the Olympics. The linejudge cried foul and the finishing tape was removed by thefinishing judge just before Carpenter crossed it. After an hourof deliberation, Carpenter was disqualified and the race wasscheduled to be rerun the following day. This led to 2 things– one was an infamous record. What record? What was theother thing this led to?
    • 14. •This word originates from the German for ‗novel ofeducation‘ or ‗novel of formation‘ and is a literary genre thatfocuses on the psychological and moral growth ofthe protagonist from youth to adulthood (coming-of-agestory), and in which character change is thus extremelyimportant.•The birth of the this genre is normally dated to thepublication of Goethe‘s The Apprenticeship of WilhelmMeister in 1795–96 and David Copperfield, GreatExpectations, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man andJane Eyre are examples of it.WTGW?
    • 15. 15.
    • 16. •The name of this activity originates from West Countrydialect of English language, meaning "Anything thick andsquat", as defined by James Jennings in his book"Observations of Some of the Dialects in The West ofEngland" published 1825.•Around 1930, the name became used for a rubber eraser.• This activity took its modern form on 1 April 1979 atthe Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol and the peopleinvolved ended up getting themselves arrested.•The commercial form began with the New Zealander, A JHackett, at Aucklands Greenhithe Bridge in 1986.What activity?
    • 17. 17.a, am, and, anywhere, are, be, boat, box, car, could, dark, do,eat, eggs, fox, goat, good, green, ham, here, house, I, if, in,let, like, may, me, mouse, not, on, or, rain, Sam, say, see, so,thank, that, the, them, there, they, train, tree, try, will, with,would, you.What is this?
    • 18. •‗Fifty Shades of Grey‘ recently overtook the Harry Potterbooks to become Britain‘s fastest selling book but theworldwide record is still held by the HP books. Uptil 1981,this record was held by ‗Lady Chatterly‘s Lovers‘.• The book that held the record in between these twoestablished works was titled ‗You Can Do The X‘ and waswritten by a 13 year old called Patrick Bossert based on hisown experiences with something at the age of 12. The booksold 1.5 million copies world-wide in 17 editions, ranked asnumber 1 on the London Times and New York Timesbestseller lists for the entire 1981.What is X, or what was the book all about?
    • 19. •X defended the America‘s Cup title thrice (1930, 1934,1937). He was posthumously elected to the Americas CupHall of Fame in 1993.• He was also a card game enthusiast who helped develop thescoring system by which contract bridge supplanted auctionbridge in popularity. Three years later, he heavily endowedthe X Trophy for bridge. As if that wasn‘t enough he alsoinvented the first forcing club bidding system which hasperennially dominated world championship play ever since.In 1969, the World Bridge Federation made him its firsthonorary member. When the American Contract BridgeLeague Hall of Fame was inaugurated in 1964, he was one ofthe first three persons elected.ID.
    • 20. Both green and colorless have figurative meanings, whichallow colorless to be interpreted as "nondescript"and green as "immature". The sentence can therefore beconstrued as "nondescript immature ideas have violentnightmares", a phrase with less oblique semantics. Inparticular, the phrase can have legitimate meaning too,if green is understood to mean "newly-formed" and sleep canbe used to figuratively express mental or verbal dormancy.An equivalent sentence would be "Newly formed bland ideasare inexpressible in an infuriating way.‖This is an attempt to make sense out of something that issemantically nonsensical. What? Who ‗composed‘ thesomething that this paragraph is trying to explain?
    • 21. ‗Zero Dark Thirty‘ is a military term used to denote 0030hours or, loosely, a very early starting time. Why, in the nearfuture, would you expect this term to enter popularconsciousness ?
    • 22. •He was born as Keith Furman in 1954 and as a child wasvery non-athletic. That all changed when, as a teenager,Furman became interested in spirituality and in 1970became a devout follower of the mystic Sri Chinmoy.Chinmoy inspired Furman to participate in a 24-hour bicyclerace in New York Citys Central Park in 1978. With only twoweeks training, Furman tied for third place, cycling 405miles.• Around this time, Furman changed his first name to Ashrita(Sanskrit for protected by god). He started doing somethingin 1979 that has earned him worldwide fame and a place inthe Guinness Book of World Records.•What did he start doing? Alternatively, what is his claim tofame ?
    • 23. What is this and whopublished it ?
    • 24. This name literally means "dont speak" in the local language.In a public speech that he delivered, he said that the namewas chosen when he wrote his first novel. Because he waswell known to be frank in his speech, he chose the name toremind himself not to speak too much.Who / what name?
    • 25. While places that are associated with this term existedbefore, this term has its origins between 1830 and 1850 as aspecific type of workshop in which a certain type ofmiddleman, the sweater, directed others in garmentmaking(the process of producing clothing), under arduousconditions and at starvation wages.Etymology of what term?
    • 26. ―Arthur eastward in arms purposedhis war to wage on the wild marches,over seas sailing to Saxon lands,from the Roman realm ruin defending.Thus the tides of time to turn backwardand the heathen to humble, his hope urged him,that with harrying ships they should hunt no moreon the shining shores and shallow watersof South Britain, booty seeking.‖The opening lines from a poem (epic?) titled ‗The Fall ofArthur‘ to be published next May. Who is the author ?

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