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Orkney Music Report
 

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Music provision for people in Orkney. A report by Gemma McGregor commisioned by Orkney Youth Music Forum November 2011.

Music provision for people in Orkney. A report by Gemma McGregor commisioned by Orkney Youth Music Forum November 2011.

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    Orkney Music Report Orkney Music Report Document Transcript

    • Music provision for young people in in Orkney A Report by Gemma McGregor commissioned by Orkney Youth Music Forum. December 2011
    • 2Table of ContentsIntroduction ......................................................................................................4Gemma McGregor ...........................................................................................4Executive Summary .........................................................................................4Terminology .....................................................................................................51. Strategic Background...................................................................................6 Youth Music Initiative ...................................................................................62. Local Background ........................................................................................73. Aims of the Orkney Youth Music Forum ......................................................74. Aims of the report.........................................................................................85. Curricular Music Provision ...........................................................................8 Orkney Schools..........................................................................................10 Peripatetic Instrumental Instructors ............................................................11 Case Study – Tuition by Video Conferencing.............................................12 School Ensembles......................................................................................12 Case Study – Collaborative Musical Performance via Internet...................13 Music for Children with Additional Support Needs......................................146. ABRSM Music Exams ................................................................................157. Community Music Provision.......................................................................15 Orkney Traditional Music Project, courtesy of Orkney Media Group..........16 Private Instructors ......................................................................................16 Case Study of Private Instructor – Rosemary Smyth .................................16 Music for the Under Fives ..........................................................................17 Orkney Traditional Music Project................................................................17 OTMP is managed by a committee consisting of: ......................................17 Case Study – Good Practice regarding Child Protection Procedure ..........18 Youth Café .................................................................................................18 The Wrigley Sisters’ School of Music .........................................................18
    • 3 Community Music Groups ..........................................................................19 Pipe Bands.................................................................................................20 Community Classical Music Groups...........................................................20 Community Singing Groups........................................................................21 Music Festivals...........................................................................................21 Case Study: Young Orkney Fiddler ............................................................238. Gaps in Provision.......................................................................................24 Popular Music.............................................................................................24 Jazz and blues ...........................................................................................24 Contemporary music and improvisation .....................................................24 Music for children and young people with additional support needs...........25 Music in Further Education.........................................................................25 Vocal and large ensemble opportunities ....................................................269. Challenges.................................................................................................2610. Case Study: Music on a Small Island.......................................................2711. Suggestions .............................................................................................2812. Conclusion ...............................................................................................2913. References...............................................................................................30
    • 4IntroductionThe Orkney Youth Music Forum, (OYMF), established in 2009, receivedDevelopment Funding from Creative Scotland in 2010 to provide a report oncurrent musical provision for under 25s in Orkney, and to produce a researchdocument for consultation with all key providers and funders in Orkney.Potentially this report could assist with the distribution of future funding to thegroups or activities that would be most beneficial to all young people andthereby support new initiatives and inclusive practice.Gemma McGregorGemma McGregor works as freelance Coordinator for Orkney Youth MusicForum, one of the 18 music forums that form a network funded by CreativeScotland. Gemma also works as a freelance composer and musician and isthe representative for the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music inOrkney. Gemma is a member of several of Orkney’s music groups includingOrkney Camerata, Orkney Strathspey and Reel Society and is on the OrkneyFolk Festival Committee.Executive SummaryThis report lists the opportunities for music making and learning for under 25sin Orkney in all genres and identifies gaps in current provision.
    • 5TerminologyFormal or Statutory Sector: music making or learning activities, happeningwithin mainstream education times and settings related to the curriculum,provided by Orkney Islands Council Education Service. These are fundedthrough OIC core funding.Instrumental Instructor/Peripatetic teacher: teacher of one or a group ofinstruments employed by OIC to teach an instrument individually or in a smallgroup, outside of class.Itinerant class music teachers: music teachers who deliver a weekly musicclass that may include theory, history, group singing or playing, and who, inOrkney, usually have a timetable of different schools to visit.Community Music: music making or learning that takes place outside ofschool or local authority provision within groups that, in Orkney, are almostentirely self-funded and non-profit making. Occasionally groups receive one-off grants from funding bodies or businesses, such as Lottery Funding,Awards for All or Talisman Energy.Youth Music Initiative: a funding stream from Creative Scotland for thepurpose of supporting music making programmes particularly for youngpeople that would not normally engage in music activities.YMI Formula Fund: Fund for supervised music-making activities that happenmostly within school time, as a complement and addition to core musicprovision provided by the local authority. Some of these activities have beenfunded on an annual basis.YMI Informal Sector, large and small grants: Fund for supervised music-making activities that happen mostly outside mainstream education times andsettings. Local groups and organisations and local authorities, with theexception of schools, instrumental music services or YMI formula fund budgetholders are eligible to be the lead applicant in applications. Strong activepartnerships with informal sector organisations must be demonstrated in orderto be considered for investment.
    • 61. Strategic BackgroundThe National Youth Music Strategy published by the Scottish Arts Council,(now Creative Scotland), in November 2006 stated that all children and youngpeople in Scotland should: experience music making have their musical preferences respected and supported have access to high quality musical resources, both physical and human continue to develop their music making to whatever level they aspire to.SAC suggested that this would be achieved through the following strategicaims – widening participation sustaining participation organising participation promoting participation.1Our inheritance, five years on from that directive, is that music making is morereadily available for young people in Orkney.Youth Music InitiativeFollowing an Audit of Youth Music Provision in February 2003, the ScottishArts Council worked with local authorities and music organisations to developa strategy called the Youth Music Initiative 2 (YMI). The aims of YMI were to - improve the availability of musical instruments; widen the spread of instruments and musical styles for children; maximise the role of the voluntary and informal education sector.These goals were to be delivered locally through two funding streams –Formula funding and Informal funding.The Youth Music Initiative is currently funded at £10 million per annum, with£8 million being routed through Creative Scotland to local authorities intoschools to meet the P6 target, which is to ensure that all children receive theopportunity of one year’s music tuition by the time that they reach primary six.On 19th October, 2011, the Scottish Government’s culture secretary, FionaHyslop, formally announced the funding allocation for 2012-13. A further £8million is being invested in the Scottish Government’s Youth Music Initiative.
    • 7The YMI will continue to support more than 300 projects, nationally, coveringall musical genres, age groups and teaching methods from 2012 – 2013.2. Local BackgroundIn June 2009, Orkney Islands Council received funding from CreativeScotland to set up the Orkney Youth Music Forum, which was managed byOIC and coordinated by Gemma McGregor.Creative Scotland planned, “to create music forums and begin the process ofhaving a unified approach to music provision which reflects local needs anddemand.” 3The Orkney Youth Music Forum is a group of musicians, music teachers,group leaders and young people who are involved with music for under 25s inOrkney. It is run by a committee, chaired by Glenys Hughes, and holds fourpublic meetings annually. It has a website,4which describes the music scenein Orkney, has a Service Directory listing all local music groups and festivalsand posts news bulletins regarding funding, local awards, etc.The support and development of youth music forums is a crucial part ofCreative Scotland’s strategy to ‘encourage and create a strengthened andunified infrastructure of music providers on a local, regional and nationallevel’.5OYMF coordinator, Gemma McGregor, is based in Orkney’s main town,Kirkwall. Orkney is situated about twenty miles off the north coast of Scotland.There are seventy Orkney Islands, seventeen of them inhabited. Eightypercent of the population live on mainland Orkney and twenty percent on theoutlying islands. Orkney has a population of approximately 20,000 people.3. Aims of the Orkney Youth Music ForumThe aims of OYMF are to improve awareness of and to coordinate youthmusic activities in the statutory sector (provided by local authority), andinformal sector (supervised music-making activities that happen outsidemainstream education times and settings). The OYMF aims to facilitatecollaboration, to identify gaps in provision, to improve access to music, and toassist joint learning and the introduction of new ideas for training and musicmaking.
    • 84. Aims of the reportThis report proposes to list current musical provision for under 25s in Orkneyand identify gaps in provision. It is hoped that the report will encourage localmusic providers to adopt a unified approach to music provision that isresponsive to local need.The report is based on the supposition that raising awareness of musicalprovision, funding and collaborative opportunities can increase access tomusic making for under 25s in Orkney.The rationale for this hypothesis is that there are many examples of goodpractice within music groups in Orkney communities, and, if this informationwere to be shared through a coordinating agency, a wide range of groupscould learn and provision could increase. Gaps in provision could be identifiedand access to provision could grow in response to wider awareness ofopportunities.5. Curricular Music ProvisionOrkney Islands Council Education Service delivers music education throughschools under the directives of the Curriculum for Excellence, the age 3-18curriculum in Scotland, published by the Scottish Government, overseen byEducation Scotland, and introduced in 2010. Ultimately, the aim of theCurriculum for Excellence is to make Scotland’s education system fit for themodern world and improve young people’s achievements, attainment and lifechances through enabling them to become successful learners, confidentindividuals, responsible citizens and effective contributors.Orkney has a school population of approximately 3,000. The local authorityhas an Instrumental Music Service that is managed by the Principal Teacherof Expressive Arts from the OIC Education Services, who is a member ofHITS (Heads of Instrumental Teaching Scotland). There are nine full and part-time instrumental instructors who teach in twenty-two schools. Instrumentscan be borrowed for one year (larger instruments for longer) by school pupilswho take instrumental lessons. Students miss a different subject class eachweek in order to attend a 25 minute lesson with their instrumental teacherwhich is generally given as part of a small group. The Instrumental Servicehas a stock of instruments worth £120,000.Towards the end of P3, P4 or P5, depending on the availability of spaces andtype of instrument, parents will receive a letter asking if their child is interestedin learning an instrument. Pupils who are keen will be tested on their musicalpotential and the instructor will discuss them with their class teacher, music
    • 9teacher and head teacher. Pupils will then be offered a place, if one isavailable, on a trial basis. Generally, pupils can begin fiddle tuition at P4 andbrass and woodwind at P6, though wind instructors do sometimes start themoff earlier. If places are available, pupils can begin tuition later in their schoolcareer.Instructors are given in-service training relevant to their work – for example,the instructors have worked alongside conductor, James Lowe, to improvetheir conducting skills. Full-time instructors have been provided with laptopcomputers and Sibelius music notation software. The number of disciplinestaught in any school is relative to the size of the school roll. The instrumentalservice provides tuition to around 500 students and this representsapproximately 24% of the eligible school population.The Instrumental Service supports ensembles in both secondary schools andfive of the junior highs and primaries. The service provides two annualinstrumental courses and young musicians are invited to participate – thosewho learn at school and those who learn in the community. There are coursesfor strings, brass, percussion and woodwind - seniors meet for four days inNovember (about 100 students) and juniors for four days in May (nearly 200students). The courses are delivered by seven of the music staff and concludewith public concerts at the mainland secondary schools in November and thecounty leisure centre in May. At present there are no charges for lessons orinstrument hire and the service costs £235,000 to run annually. A publicconsultation regarding proposed charges took place in September, the resultsof which were collated by Orkney Islands Council in November 2011. Fullcouncil did not ratify the recommendation of the Education and LeisureCommittee to introduce charges and the matter has been deferred untilFebruary 2012.Three Orkney Junior High Schools, located on the islands of Westray, Sandayand Stronsay, provide education from nursery up to secondary school fourthyear and the North Walls Junior High, located on the island of Hoy, provideseducation from nursery up to primary seven. There are 17 Primary Schoolsand a Halls of Residence, located in Kirkwall, to permit island pupils to attendKirkwall Grammar School. The Council encourages wide community use ofthe school estate and recognizes school buildings as a valuable communityasset. Of the Council’s 17 Primary schools, 15 are designated as communityschools and there is some community use of all schools. There are 22schools in Orkney (and one mothballed at present) and they all receive classmusic tuition from one of the team of visiting itinerant music teachers whohave complicated timetables and travel arrangements in order to reach themall. The itinerant class music teachers give a broad background to musicaltraining, history and appreciation and do include some group playing of
    • 10instruments such as keyboards, tin whistles, recorders and percussion in theirprogramme. Itinerant music teachers also provide opportunities for creativework by providing ensemble opportunities in line with the creating anddesigning requirement of the Curriculum for Excellence. However, some islesschools only receive a visit from an instrumental instructor 8 times peracademic year.Orkney SchoolsOn mainland Orkney there are two senior secondary schools - Kirkwall Grammar School (853 students) Stromness Academy (407 students)There are Junior High Schools on four of the islands – Westray Junior High School (up to Senior 4) (59 students) Sanday Junior High School (up to Senior 4) (56 students) Stronsay Junior High School (up to Senior 4) (53 students) North Walls Junior High (up to Primary 7) (19 students)There are eleven mainland primary schools – Burray (11 students) Dounby (167 students) Evie (54 students) Firth (80 students) Glaitness (204 students) Saint Margaret’s Hope (76 students) Orphir (48 students) Papdale (461 students) St Andrews (179 students) Stenness (33 students) Stromness (173 students)There are six isles primary schools receiving the following tuition - Shapinsay Primary School (25 students) - 2 hour visit weekly - woodwind Rousay Primary School (22 students) 16 half day visits annually - violin (YMI) Eday Primary School (8 students - 8 visits annually – violin (YMI) 4 visits annually - woodwind (YMI) Papa Westray Primary School (9 students) - 8 visits annually - violin 4 visits annually - woodwind (YMI) North Ronaldsay Primary School (5 students) - 8 visits annually - violin (YMI)
    • 11 Flotta Primary School (No students at present)Peripatetic Instrumental Instructors 1. Brass teacher: 5 days Papdale Primary 1.5 days, Kirkwall Grammar School 1.5 days, Dounby Primary 0.5 days, Stromness Primary 0.5 days, Stromness Academy 1 day 2. Woodwind teacher : 5 days Papdale Primary 1 day, Kirkwall Grammar School 1.5 days, Glaitness Primary 0.5 days, Dounby Primary 0.33 days, Stromness Primary 0.66 days, Stromness Academy 1 day 3. Violin & Viola teacher: 5 days Kirkwall Grammar School 3 days, Orphir Primary 0.5 days, St Andrews Primary 0.5 days, Burray Primary 0.33 days, St Margaret’s Hope Primary 0.66 days 4. Violin & Viola teacher: 4 days Stromness Academy 2 days + 2hours, North Walls Junior High 0.5 days, Stromness Primary 0.66 days, Dounby Primary 0.33 days, Sanday Junior High 28 days per year 5. Violin & Viola teacher : 2.5 days and YMI 24 days per year Kirkwall Grammar School 1.5 days, Glaitness Primary 0.5 days, YMI funded: Westray Junior High 26 days per year, Eday Primary 8 days per year, Papay Primary 8 days per year, North Ronaldsay Primary 8 days per year 6. Cello teacher: 2 days and YMI 8 days per year Papdale Primary 0.33 days, Stromness Primary 0.5 days, Stromness Academy 1 hour, St Margaret’s Hope Primary 1 hour, Kirkwall Grammar School 0.66 days, YMI funded: Sanday 4 days per year , Stronsay 4 days per year 7. Cello & fiddle teacher– 2.45 hours per week– Stronsay Junior High 8. Violin teacher: 2.5 days YMI 8 days/year Papdale Primary 1.5 days, Firth Primary 0.5 days YMI funded: Stenness Primary 0.5 days, Rousay Primary 16 x 0.5 days per year 9. Woodwind teacher: 1 day and YMI 8 days per year Kirkwall Grammar School 1 day, YMI funded: Papay Primary 8 days per year, /Eday Primary 8 days per year 10. Woodwind teacher: 1.33 day St Andrews Primary 1 day, Shapinsay Primary 2 hours weekly
    • 12 11. Accordion teacher - 1 hour per week YMI funded Westray Junior High 12. Guitar teacher: 30 days annually YMI funded Kirkwall Grammar School, Stromness Academy, Firth Primary and Evie Primary.The costs for the instrumental tuition listed above are met by Youth MusicInitiative formula funding where indicated.Case Study – Tuition by Video ConferencingThe local authority peripatetic brass teacher taught a young tenor horn playerfrom the island of Hoy for the years of S1 – S2. He is the only OIC brassteacher in the Orkney instrumental service and does not visit Hoy as a part ofhis timetable. He endeavoured to teach the student through using videoconferencing supported by occasional lessons on mainland. The teacher didtry working with the different video conferencing equipment available inOrkney, but was unable to get a good enough connection with quality soundand no breaks in order to make the lessons worthwhile. He reported that if theinternet connection was improved and the equipment was of better quality,then it is possible that supporting isles students between monthly lessons bymeans of video conferencing would be both beneficial to the students andcost effective.Five years ago, two of Orkney’s music teachers received specialist percussiontraining in order to address the need for students to learn percussion as therehad been no regular training previously. As a follow-up to a training sessionwith percussion expert, Pamela Dow, the two teachers and their studentsreceived some ongoing advice via video conferencing. This kind of follow-upwas found to be beneficial for both staff and students and a good option whenthe cost of travel makes another visit by the trainer to Orkney out of thequestion.School Ensembles 1. Stromness Academy String Group 2. Stromness Academy Choir 3. Stromness Academy Samba Group 4. Kirkwall Grammar School Orchestra 5. Kirkwall Grammar School Senior Choir 6. Kirkwall Grammar School Junior Girls Choir 7. Kirkwall Grammar School Wind Band 8. Kirkwall Grammar School Big Band 9. Kirkwall Grammar School Junior Traditional Fiddle Group 10. Kirkwall Grammar School, Hadhirgaan (Traditional Music Group)
    • 13 11. St Andrews Fiddle Club 12. St Andrews School Band 13. St Andrews Guitar Club 14. St Andrews Choir 15. St Andrews P6 Music Group 16. St Andrews P7 Music Group 17. St Andrews P5 Chimes Group 18. St Andrews P5 Whistle Group 19. Papdale Orchestra 20. Papdale Steel Bands 21. Papdale Brass Band 22. Papdale Senior Choir 23. Papdale Junior Choir 24. Papdale Percussion Group/Samba Band 25. Glaitness Choir 26. Glaitness Whistle Group 27. Stromness Primary Choir 28. Sanday Fiddle ClubCase Study – Collaborative Musical Performance via InternetThe local authority instrumental instructor worked with Shapinsay CommunitySchool to help them to collaborate with a school in Norway via the Internet.The itinerant music teacher taught children from the whole school their songsand script and helped with the performance.Shapinsay Community School made pioneering use of technology to webcasta joint performance of their 2006 Christmas production with Grinder school inNorway. The two schools worked together on a script for the play, splitting thenumber of scenes to be performed between them. The idea was to mix thelive scenes at each school alternating with a projected webcast, usingMarratech video conferencing technology. Work on the play began a yearprior to the final performance, and regular video conferencing software suchas iChat and AIM was used extensively in discussing and planning the event.Marratech videoconferencing software was part of the technology used by theScottish GLOW schools education network, and provided the high qualitynecessary for music and video to be streamed live over the internet. Thesmall island of Shapinsay had recently been enabled for broadband, and arequest was put out for local residents to refrain from using it for the durationof the morning performance. BT upgraded the Internet connection for theproject. Technical support was provided by OIC’s IT department, and they setup all the microphones, cameras and projection equipment. Assistance wasreceived from Learning and Teaching Scotland, who helped with the customsettings required to tweak Marratech for glitch-free music broadcast.
    • 14For the performance, each school had a stage set up, together with aprojector and sound and lighting rig. Shapinsay and Grinder took it in turns toperform their allocated scenes live, with the alternate webcast performancesprojected on the stage backdrop. The performances were a triumph, withoutstanding audio and video quality, due in part to the professional equipmentused. There was a real sense of achievement and satisfaction at the project’ssuccess, and it proved how cultural collaboration can thrive,regardless of distance. The project acted as a test bed for Marratechsoftware, and the results were fed back to Learning and Teaching Scotland 5to improve the GLOW network.6Music for Children with Additional Support NeedsAll pupils, including those with additional support needs, receive class musiclessons for at least fifty minutes per week. Pupils with additional supportneeds have class lessons with a music teacher and some have sessions onthe Skoog, which is being piloted in Orkney using YMI Formula Funding. Agroup using the Skoog (a touch sensitive cube that can trigger programmedrecorded music or sound) performed as part of the Glaitness primary schoolconcert this year, together with a choir and a group on tin whistles. Somesecondary level students attend Kirkwall Grammar School and receive classlessons, which involve guided listening, group singing and playing guitars andpercussion. An inclusive project called “Include Me’’, funded by YMI, iscurrently under way at Stromness Academy.Music teachers and instructors work, when appropriate, with specialisedmusic technology including touch-sensitive switches, ultrasonic movementdetectors and computer software. The music service has for the past yearbeen working with Drake Music Scotland to introduce the Figure Notessystem of music notation, initially at Glaitness School, with the intention ofextending this to other Orkney schools.The drama specialist (also the Principal Teacher of Expressive Arts) hasworked collaboratively with music teachers and learning support assistants todeliver several creative projects and pupils with additional support needs havebeen involved in several music projects for previous St Magnus Festivals.Drake Music Scotland are going to work with music teachers and instrumentalinstructors in order to include a group of pupils with additional support needsin the May 2012 schools instrumental concert. There are singing projectsplanned for summer of 2012 which will involve inclusive groups of sixty islesstudents and two hundred and eighty mainland students.All staff recognise the importance of the role of music in the emotional andsocial development of all pupils, and that participation in musical activities canbe especially valuable to those with additional support needs.
    • 156. ABRSM Music ExamsThe Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music have been sending oneof their examiners to Orkney to examine instrumentalists and singers sincethe 1950s and Stromness Town Hall was established as an examinationcentre in 1976.There are three visits per year to a mainland centre wherecandidates are assessed on the playing of three pieces, scales, sight-readingand aural tests. There is an unmarked (comments only) preparatory test andeight grades that are marked out of 150 with a pass mark of 100. The ABRSMwill send examiners for special visits to schools or islands if three hours worthof exams are required. Between 30 and 60 candidates present for exams atthe Orkney centre each session. The ABRSM also provide written theoryexams Grades 1-8 three times a year. The ABRSM qualifications arerespected worldwide and are necessary for auditions for further educationinstitutions and national orchestras and choirs. Teachers from both thestatutory and the private sector enter their students for the ABRSM examsand candidates can be entered by their school, teacher, or even bythemselves. 77. Community Music Provision
    • 16Orkney Traditional Music Project, courtesy of Orkney Media Group.Private InstructorsThere is a large variety of private music teachers available in Orkney rangingfrom the very casual or inexperienced to those with third level musiceducation and professional backgrounds. Fees for lessons range from £5 to£18 per half hour lesson. At the present time there is no regulation of privatemusic teaching. This means that anyone can offer music lessons at any price.There is no stipulation for a private music teacher to have gone through childprotection checks and it is the responsibility of parents to ensure that ateacher is suitable. The law on private teaching is going to change and it isprobable that a Protecting Vulnerable Groups (PVG) certificate will becomenecessary for those wishing to teach under 18s on a private basis.In Orkney there are the following practising private music teachers:  Thirteen piano teachers  Six violin teachers  One all woodwind teacher  Three flute teachers  Four accordion teachers  Two cello teachers  One organ teacher  Two trumpet teachers  Two guitar and mandolin teachers  One bass guitar teacher  One drumming teacher  Four voice teachersCase Study of Private Instructor – Rosemary SmythRosemary Smyth had a career of class music teaching and has taught musicat her home in Kirkwall for twenty years. She teaches piano, music theory andmusicianship as necessary. Rosemary enters students for the music examsrun by the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music in Orkney andalso helps out with playing the accompaniments for other teachers’ students.Not all of her students sit music exams and depending on suitability,Rosemary will teach a more general musicianship course as appropriate.Rosemary holds end of year concerts for her students to perform to oneanother. Rosemary embraces many musical activities in the communityincluding playing the St Magnus Cathedral organ and has been assistantorganist at the Cathedral for the last ten years.
    • 17Music for the Under FivesThe Orkney library supervises “Bookbug” weekly meetings for toddlers andparents at Stromness and Dounby, and twice-weekly meetings at OrkneyLibrary and Lambaness community centre. The purpose of the meetings isprimarily to promote reading but group leaders do teach rhymes and songs atevery session. Bookbug Coordinator is Patsy Smith who works at the Orkneylibrary and archive.Orkney Traditional Music ProjectThe Orkney Traditional Music Project in its present form was started in 1998to provide tuition in accordions. Shortly thereafter, fiddle classes were addedand OTMP currently provides five fiddle classes and four accordionclasses on Saturday mornings in Kirkwall Town Hall. OTMP is presentlyteaching 135 pupils who are charged £2 for each hour-long lesson. There arethree terms of ten weeks of classes per year. OTMP resident tutors areElizabeth Duncan (Musical Director), Diane Kelday, and Susan Webb (fiddles)and Nicky Palmer and Ellen Grieve (accordions). Visiting tutors are brought inon a regular basis to augment normal tuition.Concerts are held during the year and groups of pupils play at many localfunctions; Tall Ships, Royal Visits, St Magnus Festival, Orkney Folk Festivaland County Show. Lunchtime concerts are held in the Cathedral everySaturday during May and June.Weekly classes are held at Kirkwall Community Centre. In August each yearthere is a four-day Summer School, which is held at Orkney College, EastRoad, Kirkwall. Visiting tutors in 2011 were Ian Lowthian and Ishbel Borland(accordion) and Eunice Henderson and Kristan Harvey (fiddle).OTMP was voted Community Project of the Year in the BBC Alba ScottishTraditional Music Award 2010. OTMP is generally self-funded but doesappreciate occasional support from sponsors including, the Scottish FiddleOrchestra, Talisman Energy, Flotta Oil Terminal and Northlink Ferries.OTMP is managed by a committee consisting of:  Chairperson - Freda Burgher  Vice Chairperson - John Rendall  Treasurer - Dave Gunn  Musical Director - Elizabeth Duncan  Ordinary members - Isabel Alexander, Winkie Eunson, Jim Marwick
    • 18Case Study – Good Practice regarding Child ProtectionProcedureWhen young people wish to join Orkney Traditional Music Project, two formsare required. One is a class enrolment form with basic details of contactinformation and the class to be attended. This form is held by the Treasurerand Lead Signatory under lock and key. The Treasurer uses information fromthe forms, such as e-mail addresses, and sends out newsletters and noticesunder blind copy.The second form, for all children under sixteen years of age, asks for detailsof contact information to be used in emergencies, information about healthrisks such as allergies, permission to be included in group photographs andrequires a signature giving consent for the child to be under the care of theOTMP tutors while at a class. These Parental Consent forms are held by theMusical Director during class times. When a child discontinues classes, allinformation relating to that child is destroyed.Each tutor has an enhanced disclosure certificate issued by the CentralRegistration Body for Scotland confirming that the person named has beenchecked and has no criminal record or allegations of past misconduct.Youth CaféThe Youth Café is situated in Kirkwall Community Centre. It has a café and agymnasium and offers rehearsal space for young bands during openinghours. One of the youth workers is planning to hold drumming workshops andclinics in the near future. The Youth Café promotes performance by youngbands in the gymnasium from time to time and assists with promotion, soundand supervision. The Youth Café hosts the Tuesday Club once a week, whichprovides an afternoon of activities for young people with Additional SupportNeeds. The Tuesday club members have enjoyed karaoke sessions at theYouth Café and live music sessions are planned for next year.The Wrigley Sisters’ School of MusicThe Wrigley Sisters’ School of Music is situated at The Reel, 6, Broad Street,Kirkwall and was established in 2004. Private freelance instructors rent roomsto teach individual private lessons. The school also offers weekly groupclasses for fiddle (adult beginners and adult improvers) and guitar withclasses of approximately 8 students attending. The school has elevenfreelance tutors that offer lessons in voice, piano, violin, guitar, mandolin,banjo, woodwind, drumming, theory, and coaching sessions. Rehearsal spaceis available for rental by community groups. The Strathspey & Reel Societyand the Accordion & Fiddle Club use the Reel for practices. The Reel is alsoused as a live music venue and has a thriving café-bar. Saturday night music
    • 19sessions are open to over eighteens and are led by local traditional group,Hullion.Community Music GroupsCommunity music groups do not provide lessons as such, but do supportlearning through weekly meetings when musicians play with the group, learnnew tunes, and prepare to perform at civic events, festivals, harvest homes,parish dances, etc. The groups marked with * have only members who areunder twenty-five years of age.(Two members of the Stronsay Silver Darlings) 1. Orkney Strathspey and Reel Society (formed 1948), 20 – 30 members, Seniors Leader – Ian Kirkness, Juniors Leader – Eric Linklater
    • 20 2. West Mainland Strathspey and Reel Society, 30-40 members, Seniors Leader – Gina Dickinson, Juniors Leader – Jean Leonard 3. Harray Traditional Music Group, approx. 8 members, Leader – Donny Grieve 4. Accordion & Fiddle Club (formed 1977), approx. 12 members, Secretary – Bert Baikie 5. Lyrie, 7 members *, Leader – Fiona Driver 6. Shoramere,10 members * Leader – Diane Kelday 7. Stronsay Silver Darlings, 18 members * Leaders – Gaynor Smith, Michael Smith & Janice Maxwell 8. Rousay Music Group, Leader – Itha Flaws 9. The Rousay Dinxwhackie Boom Music Club, Leader – Christine Courtney 10. Shapinsay Music Group (formed in 1950s), approx. 6 members, Leaders- Ian Eunson and Paul Hollinrake 11. Westray Music Group, Leader – Betty Hume 12. Sanday Music Group, Leader – Kate HowePipe Bands 1. Kirkwall City Pipe Band (formed 1919), Pipe Major - Raymond Peace, approx. 40 members 2. Stromness Pipe Band, (formed 1980), Pipe Major – Mark Wemyss, approx. 20 members 3. Rendall Pipe Band, Pipe Major – Kenny Peace approx. 15 membersThere are fifty or so learners of pipes and drums in Orkney who are undereighteen years of age. Piping and drumming exams are not held regularly inOrkney, but the bands do have an association with the National Piping Centreand they run occasional weekend workshops that include exams. This tendsto be every few years and is dependent on funding being available to bringthe workshop leaders to Orkney.Community Classical Music Groups 1. Orkney Orchestra (formed 1985), approx. 40 members, Secretary – Sandy Dennison, Leader – Iain Tait 2. Orkney Camerata (formed 1995), approx 15 members, Leader – Elizabeth Sullivan, Chair – Glenys Hughes 3. Kirkwall Town Band (originally in the 19th century but reformed in 1973), 24 members (14 are under 18), Leader – Elaine Geddes 4. The Salvation Army Brass Band (formed 1861), approx. 10 members, Leader - Geoff Thompson
    • 21Community Singing Groups 1. Mayfield Singers, (formed 1988) 22 members, Leaders – Denise Stout & Neil Price 2. Kirkwall Cathedral Choir (30 members), Leader – Iain Campbell 3. Saint Magnus Festival Chorus, (formed 1980) 100+ members, Leader – Glenys Hughes 4. Saint Olaf Choir (approx. 12 members), Leader – Ben Whitworth 5. The Holm Choir (approx.15 members), Leader – Ruth Harvey 6. Orkney Singers (formed 2005) approx. 20 members), Leaders - Emily Turton, Sarah Jane Gibbon & Lynn Campbell 7. The Linties (approx 10 members), Leader – Kath Hague 8. The Stromabank Pub Choir – (approx 15 members), Leader – Fran Gray 9. The N Boys, (5 members), Leader – George Rendall 10. The Men of Orkney (formed 1961), 10 members (2 under 18s), Leader – Geoff Thomson 11. The Bea Choir, Leader – Bill Crichton 12. Saint Margaret’s Hope Singing Group, Leader – Denise Denvir 13. The Pop Tarts – (approx. 14 members), Leader – Jenny Keldie 14. Kirkwall Amateur Operatic Society – (approx. 25 members), Leader – Lesley Howard 15. Salvation Army Songsters (formed 1861 approx. 10 members), Leader – Andrew Stanger 16. Westray Singing Group, Leader – Liz Drever 17. Singing Group for People with Memory Problems, Leader – Rachel PalmerMusic Festivals1. St Magnus International Festival was founded in 1977 by Orkney’sdistinguished resident composer Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, and is governedby a board of directors. The Festival employs a part-time Artistic Director, afull-time Festival Manager, a part-time Festival Administrator and two part-time, temporary, seasonal Box Office & Administration Assistants. The weeklong Festival always takes place during the time of the summer solsticetowards the end of June, and while focusing mainly on classical musicencompasses performances of all genres of music and other arts. Itencourages schools’ groups to benefit through projects purposely designedfor their active participation as well as visits to schools and workshops byvisiting professional orchestras, ensembles and performers. For example, theSide by Side project in 2010 was a six month project that enabled youngorchestral musicians to perform alongside a professional orchestra and toshare desks at the Festival performance. The Festival always includes
    • 22projects in music and/or drama and other arts to encourage the maximumdegree of community participation by adults and young people resident inOrkney. Many children’s opera and music theatre pieces by Maxwell Davieshave been given their world premieres at the Festival by local children.2.Orkney Folk Festival was established in 1982 and is run by a voluntarycommittee of a dozen members led by Artistic Director, Bob Gibbon andChair, Elaine Grieve. The annual festival takes place for four days at the endof May and includes an educational project in partnership with schools and ayouth concert involving young performers. Visiting artists deliver workshopson their instruments at schools and sometimes on the Saturday of the festival.For example, visiting group, The New Rope String Band, gave workshops atschools and performed a children’s concert on the Saturday afternoon of thefestival in 2009. For the last two years, the youth concert and associatedworkshops have been led by the Orkney Heritage Fiddle Project, which aimsto research and raise awareness of Orkney traditional music. Local fiddler,Douglas Montgomery, has led workshops on fiddle music by Orcadians atschools and research on Orkney music has been shared with communitygroups and local teachers.The Orkney Folk Festival received the award for Event of the Year at the 2011BBC Alba Scottish Traditional Music Awards.3.Orkney Blues Weekend was established in 2006 and is held in Septemberannually over three days, and is run by a committee of volunteers. Whilst nothaving an educational programme as such, it does encourage young bands toperform and assists with their networking with experienced artists.4.Orkney Science Festival was established in 1991 and is held annuallyduring the first week of September. It includes educational musical events andpromotes traditional Orcadian ceilidhs with live Orcadian traditional music. Italso includes a concert by organist, George McPhee, a concert by local choir,The Mayfield Singers, and sometimes a lecture on a music related theme.5.Orkney Arts Society is a charitable organisation dedicated to promotingthe arts in Orkney. OAS hosts an eclectic programme of events every seasonthat include drama, music, literature and visual arts. The annual programusually includes three concerts of chamber music or jazz by visiting artistsand a performance by Scottish Opera. For many years, the Arts Society hassupported members, Jean Leonard and Catherine Parkinson, to organise theOrkney Young Musicians Festival. The festival did not run in 2011, but OASapproached Orkney Islands Council to propose that the local authorityInstrumental Service take responsibility for it in future and external fundinghas been obtained for a four-day showcase event to be held in Spring 2012.
    • 23Case Study: Young Orkney FiddlerOrkney fiddle player, Kristan Harvey, age twenty-two, grew up on a farm inBirsay and attended secondary school in Stromness. She learned violin atschool with instructor, Rhona Casey, but also attended the Orkney TraditionalMusic Project on Saturdays and went to fiddle classes that were taught bylocal teacher, Jean Leonard. Being a member of the Orkney Traditional MusicProject meant that Kristan learned traditional music as a part of a large group,attended Summer schools and had regular performing opportunities. Sheplayed classical music at school and during the annual instrumental coursesrun by OIC and was invited to join Orkney Camerata to play classical chambermusic when she was sixteen. Kristan sat Associated Board of the RoyalSchools of Music exams during her school years and obtained the highestlevel, Grade 8, before leaving school.In her late teens, Kristan had lessons from local fiddler, Douglas Montgomery,whose playing on recordings by The Chair and Saltfishforty, had influencedher for some time. At the age of seventeen, Kristan was faced with thedilemma of whether to pursue further study in classical or traditional violinplaying. After a round of auditions, Kristan accepted a place at the RoyalScottish Academy of Music and Drama to study for a Bachelor of Musicdegree with classical violin as her principal study. While in Glasgow, studyingat RSAMD for four years, Kristan continued to play traditional fiddle with herfriends and to attend music sessions. She entered the BBC Radio ScotlandYoung Scottish Traditional Music Competition in 2011 and was crownedYoung Scottish Traditional Musician of the Year.
    • 248. Gaps in provisionPopular MusicMost music making in Orkney is of the Scottish traditional or classical musicgenres. However, many young people are more interested in playing andlistening to contemporary styles of music – rock, pop, rap, techno, Indie,garage, funk, etc. There is very limited availability of lessons, coaching,rehearsal space or performance opportunities for these young musicians inOrkney. Local rock bands almost always perform in bars that exclude under18s. The Kirkwall Youth Café does host occasional rock music evenings thatgive bands a chance to perform but this venue usually appeals only toyounger players and audiences. Stromness Academy offer studio space tostudent bands for rehearsal, and both mainland secondary schools hold anannual band competition which means that young rock bands who have beencoached by the music department staff have a chance to perform in front of alive audience at school.Although many young rock musicians do not want a weekly instrumentallesson, rock music weekends and workshops would be welcome.Music Technology is a fairly new subject to Orkney but Stromness Academyis offering a Higher course this year and Kirkwall Grammar School has twosixth year students who are taking Music Technology Higher.Jazz and bluesJazz and Blues learning opportunities in Orkney are limited. There is a BigBand at Kirkwall Grammar School and two of the local authority instructors(brass and woodwind) support instrumentalists who want to play jazz. TheABRSM jazz syllabus and grade exams have not been offered as an option byinstructors in Orkney as yet. There used to be a jazz summer school for threedays every August that was led by local jazz singer, Maureen Cursiter, butthis has not run for the last three summers.Contemporary music and improvisationThere are many opportunities for young players of orchestral instruments toplay classical music both through the Education Department and incommunity groups. However, there is almost no opportunity for young playersto experience playing or performing contemporary classical music,experimental music or improvisation. This is partly because these kinds ofmusic do not attract a significant audience in Orkney. Venues can beexpensive to hire and promoters need to be sure of significant ticket sales thatwill cover costs. The Orkney Youth Music Forum hosted the Sound Inventorscourse for young composers in Kirkwall Grammar School in 2010, ending with
    • 25a private performance. In 2011, the St Magnus Festival worked with the samegroup, helping them to write music to accompany some local amateur shortfilms. The second course with the collaborative side to it seemed to be a goodway to attract interest and increase audience numbers.Music for children and young people with additional supportneedsIt would be desirable for individual instrumental tuition to be available forlarger numbers of pupils, including those with additional support needs.Inclusion of such pupils in mainstream music projects has, in the past, beenlimited, although several schools currently include pupils with additionalsupport needs in their choirs. Pupils with additional support needs have not sofar been included in the bi-annual instrumental courses. However, plans havebeen made to enable participation in the orchestral course which will run inMay 2012 and in the concert that will end the course. It is recognized thatsuch involvement necessitates additional support staff.Young people ages 18 to 25 who have additional support needs attendOrkney College, the Keelylang Centre or the Saint Colms Day Centre. Thesecentres provide services for people aged 18 to 65 who have mild to moderatelearning difficulties. Whilst music is not a permanent part of the programme,local musicians and school groups are brought in to perform occasionally.Group singing is fairly accessible and comparatively low cost as there is noequipment necessary and a singing project can usually be started with a choirleader assisted by existing staff.Music in Further EducationFurther education in music is not available in Orkney, even though a highproportion of school students study Higher and Advanced Higher music.(Kirkwall Grammar School has 30 Higher and 12-15 Advanced Higherstudents this year.) Orkney College offers a degree in Cultural Studies as partof the University of the Highlands and Islands, but no music courses. Visitingstudents have indicated that they would like to learn more about Scottishmusic and Orcadian music at Orkney College. A number of school leaversfrom Orkney go on to study music annually but have given mixed reportsabout the quality of the courses that they attend. These range from performingcourses at conservatoires, to music degrees at universities, to musictechnology courses at colleges. A number of students report dissatisfactionwith the courses or leave without completing them. It would appear that moreinformation about the courses and the institutions that offer them wouldbenefit potential students.
    • 26Vocal and large ensemble opportunitiesThere is no county choir or annual course similar to the instrumental coursefor singers. There are school choirs, and many primary choirs meet weekly,but others only practise for Christmas concerts and are not a year roundactivity. The main opportunity for singing in a large choir in Orkney is theFestival Chorus that meets to learn a large work, Bach’s Christmas Oratoriofor example, twice a year – once for the St Magnus Festival in June and oncefor the winter concert in December. The chorus (of about 120) has only everhad a handful of young people join. This may be because the average age ofthe chorus is forty plus, or it may be that the music is perceived as too difficult.Two young singers from Orkney have auditioned and gained places in theNational Youth Choir of Scotland during the last five years. NYCS arrangedfor an Orkney candidate to record a DVD of herself singing audition pieces tosend to them rather than travelling to Edinburgh to sing live.The costs associated with joining the national choir can be prohibitive, as theyinclude fees for the courses and a trip to Scotland two or three times (possiblyonce for audition and attendance at two courses annually) with associatedtravel and accommodation costs for the applicant and accompanying family.It is a similar situation for young people who would like to audition for NationalChildren’s Orchestra of Scotland, (NCOS), and National Youth Orchestra ofScotland, (NYOS), except that these organisations do conduct auditions inOrkney every November so young musicians do not have to travel south forthose but, if successful, have to pay large fees and travel costs for twocourses or tours annually. In the past, grants have been available from thelocal authority, but these have been very small and would only have met avery small percentage of costs for these musicians.9. ChallengesWhat are the challenges that musicians, music teachers and planners face inthis location? 1. Travel difficulties including time and costs. A return flight from Kirkwall to Edinburgh can cost between £200 and £300. 2. Rural isolation. Some islands have only one flight by a 7 seater plane a day. Most islands have a daily ferry service but ferries can be cancelled during winter months. 3. Adverse weather. Leading to travel difficulties, poor attendance or cancellations in winter. Causeways connecting the south isles on the mainland are closed during stormy and snowy weather.
    • 27 4. Accessibility. It can be problematic for community groups and music projects for those living in the country, on isles or with special needs to access events. Bus services are not frequent to outlying areas and ferry timetables do not always fit in with attending events, especially in the evening. 5. Few players. The small numbers of players of some instruments leads to certain players being overburdened with rehearsals and performances of groups, musicals, shows, etc. 6. Isles lessons. Visits to isles by instructors for instrumental tuition are not frequent enough. Most isles only receive eight visits per year from their instrumental instructor. This amounts to a lesson every six weeks spread throughout the school year. Many teachers feel that it is impossible to teach a musical instrument this way, and that infrequent contact results in less practice by the students and interest wanes between visits. 7. Overnight accommodation. It can be difficult and costly to source accommodation for isles students to stay overnight in order to attend mainland projects. 8. Specialist instruments. In a small community it is inevitable that instrumental instructors have to teach multiple instruments and that for some more unusual instruments, tuition is not available in either the statutory or private sector. 9. Short-term cover. Small numbers of music staff mean that there is little availability for obtaining cover for sickness or long term leave. It can be difficult to find enough staff to help run large events.10. Case Study: Music on a Small IslandPapa Westray (known locally as Papay), is an island of six square miles withapproximately seventy inhabitants. It has a primary school with nursery,current roll of eight ranging from pre-school to P7 and a Head Teacher,support staff including relief teacher, early years assistant, classroom supportand clerical support. The school receives monthly visits (and currently morefrequent) from an itinerant music teacher, who provides between 3 and 4.5hours of music related activities, depending on plane times. Four of thestudents currently receive individual violin lessons from a visiting instrumentalinstructor, who visits 4 and sometimes more times a year, with continuitymaintained by both the music teacher and Kate Evans, Head Teacher, inorder to create as near weekly provision as can be managed. Visits by theviolin instructor are funded by YMI to visit Papay, along with the woodwind
    • 28instructor, who visits similarly between 4-8 times per year, to offer recorderlessons to six of the students and guitar to two of the students as well asensemble work (often singing). For the past year the two students playingguitar have also had practices with a local player although due to staffingchanges they are currently hoping to find a new volunteer to support theirplaying. Two years ago, the school children took their musical instruments toNorth Ronaldsay to join with the children there for a Burns celebration.The Papay Community Association is the main organiser of events on the isle,and organises dances and music workshops. Traditional dances are enjoyedby the whole age range of residents, creating a way for children to identifywith local dance and music from an early age. Children practise dancing inschool and have even sent instructions and a short video to a school in theUSA to teach the children there a traditional dance. Dances are oftenaccompanied by the Westray Band or the Papay band. The Papay Bandconsists of Margaret Rendall on accordion and Paul Griffith on guitar andbanjo accompanied by young people on drums and guitars. Paul is presentlyteaching a group of young ukelele players tunes for upcoming events.Also living on Papay are visual artists, Ivanov and Chan, who promote eventsthat feature local and visiting artists of all disciplines with a particularemphasis on creating new works that include the community. For example,the piece for accordion, fiddle and sound titled Papay People by composer,James Heseltine.A small community like Papay values all of its visitors and makes themaximum use of their skills during their visits to the island. If Papay invites aband over for a dance the Community Association will take the opportunity toorganise music and dance workshops for their young people during themusicians’ stay on the island. Events such as the St Boniface Carol Service,the Muckle Supper and Burns Night provide further opportunities for localresidents, including all ages, and visitors to join together – in fact wheneverthere is a gap in the social round, the Papay Community Association springsinto action to bring people together to enjoy playing traditional music anddancing. Papay folk are good at spotting any opportunity to harness thetalents of visitors and to include visitors in their celebration of island culture.11. SuggestionsThese suggestions represent a summary of comments that have been madeby instructors, private music teachers, youth workers and young musicians. Ayoung people’s focus group met with Gemma McGregor at Kirkwall GrammarSchool to discuss music provision in Orkney and their comments arerepresented below.
    • 29 An annually reviewed and monitored online registration form for private Orkney music teachers. Early vocational advice for those interested in careers in music. Young musicians with thoughts of pursuing a career and/or further music education to be given the opportunity to talk with professional musicians with experience of their field. An opportunity for young musicians who have left Orkney to study could be made for them to come back and speak about their experience to careers staff and other students. An annual talent show for all young musicians of all genres. Good quality video conferencing for isles schools and peripatetic teachers. Private venues to be encouraged to host youth events and possibly delay closing times for weekend events. OIC could offer ongoing in-service training to private teachers, maybe for a small fee. This would encourage networking possibilities for both sectors and lower training costs for OIC. Continuing Professional Development for music teachers to learn how to operate and maintain PA, recording equipment, etc. OIC to create a bank of sound equipment for young musicians to borrow and receive training on. If this bank were publicised, people could donate equipment that they no longer need as they upgrade. Music for disengaged youth – an alcohol-free music club on Friday and Saturday nights. Small isles could be helped by OIC and/or Voluntary Action Orkney to access funding to help organise and fund travel to mainland events that they would otherwise be excluded from. A comparison with music provision in Western Isles and Shetland in both formal and informal sectors could be beneficial to all island groups in order to note what works for them in an island setting. Collaborations between music groups, between art forms and between festivals could be encouraged with a view to sharing skills and resources and building self-sustaining projects that are not reliant on external funding.12. ConclusionThis report shows that there is much to celebrate with regard to the musicprovision for young people in Orkney. Learning, listening and performingopportunities are very diverse and this small community holds musiceducation for youth in high regard. However, there are issues around
    • 30provision and accessibility that could be looked at by planners in botheducational and entertainment settings. The strongest response from youngpeople regarding provision was that they would like more opportunities forlearning, performing and listening to popular music. It would seem that musicprovision could widen in Orkney through raising awareness of:  the opportunities already available;  funding streams appropriate for local young musicians and groups;  resources that could be shared.13. References1 National Youth Music Strategy (Scottish Arts Council, 2006)http://www.scottisharts.org.uk/1/information2 Youth Music Initiative – The Beginning ( Scottish Arts Council, 2007)http://www.scottisharts.org.uk/1/artsinscotland/music/youthmusicinitiative/thebeginning.aspx3 www.ymf.org.uk/ABOUTYMFS.ORG.UK4www.orkneycommunities.co.uk/YOUTHMUSICFORUM5 Learning and Teaching Scotland has now been incorporated into Education Scotland (sinceJuly 2011), which is ‘the Scottish Government’s national development and improvementagency for education’. www.ltscotland.org.uk/aboutlts/index.asp6 ‘GLOW is the world’s first national online community for education. It’sbasically an education intranet.’www.ltscotland.org.uk/usingglowandict/index.asp / ABOUTCURRENTLYVIEWING YMFS.ORG.UK / ABOUT7 More information about ABRSM is available at www.abrsm.org
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