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    Scholarly inquiryslides2013 dr. rothwell Scholarly inquiryslides2013 dr. rothwell Presentation Transcript

    • William J. Rothwell, Ph.D., SPHR, CPLP Fellow Professor Penn State University and President Rothwell & Associates, Inc. Email: wjr9@psu.edu Phone: 814-863-2581 1 © Copyright 2013 by William J. Rothwell Carve Your Career Your Way!
    • INTRODUCTORY POLL How many of you would say that: •You feel that you know everything you need about career planning? •You feel that you could improve what you know about career planning? •You feel that you could improve dramatically what you know about career planning? 2
    • PART I: INTRODUCTION 3 © Copyright 2013 by William J. Rothwell
    • OVERVIEW In an increasingly fierce global economy, the individual’s career planning and development is a personal responsibility. It is a mistake to expect your boss, your spouse, your parents, your teachers or other people to assume any responsibility for your career. It’s all up to you! But what should be considered in career planning and development? This session focuses on your role—that is, the individual’s role—in career planning and development. An effective career plan is essential if an individual is to make the most of professional development. This session focuses on you. 4
    • OBJECTIVES Upon completing this session, you will be able to: •Define career and distinguish that from a job •Explain who is responsible for one’s career and what that responsibility means •Show increased self-awareness 5
    • ICEBREAKER • Stand up and talk to as many people as you can • Ask as many of these questions as possible: (1) how much have you thought about your own career planning? (2) how often have you discussed career planning with your peers? and (3) how clear are you on what you want to do once you finish your degree? • When we come back, be prepared to share what you have learned about yourself or from others 6
    • ICEBREAKER Who would like to volunteer answers to the following questions: •How much have you thought about your own career planning? •How often have you discussed career planning with your peers? •How clear are you on what you want to do once you finish your degree? 7
    • ABOUT WILLIAM J. ROTHWELL • 20 years of experience in training and organization development before Penn State • 20 years at Penn State • Authored, coauthored, edited, and coedited 85 books and 200 articles (at current count) • Travelled internationally extensively, including 70 visits to China since 1996 • Visited every Asian country except six (guess which ones?) 8
    • ABOUT WILLIAM J. ROTHWELL 9
    • ABOUT WILLIAM J. ROTHWELL 10
    • ABOUT WILLIAM J. ROTHWELL 11
    • ABOUT WILLIAM J. ROTHWELL 12 New books not yet in print
    • ABOUT WILLIAM J. ROTHWELL 13 My most famous book:
    • ADVICE FOR DOCTORAL STUDIES IN WORKFORCE EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT • You are expected to possess clear career goals and clear research interests as you begin the degree program • There should be some logical relationship between career goals and research interests • Expect to be asked for your career goals every time you want to do something in the program—at candidacies, during courses, when you choose internships, when you take comps, when you choose your dissertation topic, and when you defend your dissertation • Career goals should be well-researched and not superficial • If you don’t know what that career goal is, you should not be in the program 14
    • ADVICE FOR DOCTORAL STUDIES IN WORKFORCE EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT • Get yourself at least one mentor who is in the job you wish to have when you finish • Some students make the mistake of assuming that rushing through the degree is desirable and they can later acquire whatever else they need to be attractive to employers after receiving the degree • Realize that employers do not know what a Ph.D. means; employers do not know what an “A” on a transcript means; and employers in different industries have different expectations • Build a portfolio of work samples while in the program because a Ph.D. is not enough to meet your career goals • Plan for that portfolio in Part 2 of your Plan of Study 15
    • ADVICE FOR DOCTORAL STUDIES IN WORKFORCE EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT • Our students tend to have different goals: teach; be a practitioner; be a consultant; be an Outreach/Continuing Education professional; be a CTE professional; be an educational administrator—and different work samples are needed depending on the goal • Mentors are good sources of information about what should be in the portfolio • Professional certifications are becoming critical to job success—and employability—and you should consider receiving the ones most appropriate to achieving your career goals • We expect our students to be assertive and not sit around and wait for others to come to them 16
    • ADVICE FOR DOCTORAL STUDIES IN WORKFORCE EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT • Use the time in the program—especially at first—to reflect on your personal strengths and how to leverage those to advantage • Most people don’t know what their personal strengths are and some people spend a lifetime drifting to one thing and then another because they don’t have a direction and have no clear sense of their life goals and career goals • What are your core competencies? How can you leverage them to your advantage and to help others? 17
    • WHAT IS A CAREER? • Career is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as a person’s "course or progress through life (or a distinct portion of life)“. • It can also pertain to an occupation or a profession that usually involves special training or formal education, and is considered to be a person’s lifework • Most people agree that a career is a series of related jobs or related work. 18
    • WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT CAREERS? • According to a recent study in the United States, Baby Boomers and workers from the "younger Boomer" generation -- those between ages 39 and 48 -- switched jobs over the course of their careers at a much greater pace than thought. • The study, conducted over 25 years by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, tracked the employment histories of 9,964 workers who were 14 to 22 when first interviewed and 39 to 48 when interviewed last. 19
    • WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT CAREERS? • It found that the average younger Boomer has held 10.5 jobs throughout their careers. • That works out to a job change about every 2 1/3 years. • A job was defined as an "uninterrupted period of work with a particular employer" . • A promotion or change of position within one company was not counted as a different job. • What are the trends in Singapore for job switching? 20
    • WHAT IS CAREER PLANNING? • The process of establishing career objectives and determining appropriate educational and developmental programs to further develop the skills required to achieve short- or long-term career goals or objectives • A subset of life planning 21 Career Planning Career Planning Life Planning What are some examples of life planning questions and career planning questions?
    • WHAT IS CAREER MANAGEMENT? The process of an organization establishing career paths or relationships and giving individuals the ability to plot the qualifications necessary to move from one “job” to another. 22
    • WHAT IS CAREER DEVELOPMENT? Career development is sometimes understood as an umbrella term that includes both career planning and career management. 23
    • WHAT ARE THEORIES OF CAREER PLANNING? Career planning theories can be categorized as: Theory of process •Theories of process relate to interaction and change over time •This can be characterized by theories in which there are a series of stages through which people pass 24
    • WHAT ARE THEORIES OF CAREER PLANNING? Example of a theory of process is Daniel Levinson. According to him, people progress through 6 stages of life: There are 6 stages of adulthood in Levinson's theory titled "Seasons of a Man's Life": 1) Early adult transition (17-22) - leave adolescence, make preliminary choices for adult life 2) Entering the adult world (22-28) - make initial choices in love, occupation, friendship, values, lifestyle 25
    • WHAT ARE THEORIES OF CAREER PLANNING? 3) Age 30 transition (28-33) - changes occur in life structure, either a moderate change or, more often, a severe and stressful crisis 4) Settling down (33-40) - establish a niche in society, progress on a timetable, in both family and career accomplishments; are expected to think and behave like a parent so they are facing more demanding roles and expectations 26
    • WHAT ARE THEORIES OF CAREER PLANNING? 5) Mid-life transition (40-45) - life structure comes into question, usually a time of crisis in the meaning, direction, and value of each person's life. Neglected parts of the self (talents, desires, aspirations) seek expression 6) Entering middle adulthood (45- 50) - choices must be made, a new life structure formed. Person must commit to new tasks 27
    • WHAT ARE THEORIES OF CAREER PLANNING? Theory of content Theories of content relate to the characteristics of the individual and the context they live in. The influences on career development are thought to be either intrinsic to the individual or originate from the context in which the individual lives. 28
    • PHILOSOPHIES OF CAREERS Philosophies of careers may differ depending on views about: •Who people believe bear the most responsibility for careers •What careers are •When careers are planned •Where careers are planned •Why careers are planned •How careers are planned •How often careers are changed—and should be changed 29
    • ACTIVITY ON PHILOSOPHIES OF CAREERS • Spend a minute or two to write on a sheet of paper your answers to the questions. Then hold the paper up, stand up, walk around, and read what others wrote:  Who do you believe bears the most responsibility for career planning?  What is your definition of a career?  When should a career be planned?  Where should careers be planned?  Why are careers planned?  How are careers planned?  How often should careers be changed? 30
    • DEBRIEF OF THE ACTIVITY ON PHILOSOPHIES OF CAREERS • How did most people answer the questions:  Who do you believe bears the most responsibility for career planning?  What is your definition of a career?  When should a career be planned?  Where should careers be planned?  Why are careers planned?  How are careers planned?  How often should careers be changed? 31
    • PART II: BUILDING YOUR SELF AWARENESS 32 © Copyright 2013 by William J. Rothwell
    • PERSONAL WAKE UP CALL Consider these questions: •“What are my potential personal and professional development options?” •“What are the benefits and risks of these potential developmental moves?” •“What are the lessons learned from my past personal and professional development moves?” 33
    • PERSONAL WAKE UP CALL: STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR YOUR CAREER • Most people have heard of the strategic planning model. • It is widely used in planning for the future of organizations. • But it can also be used for planning your career. • There are many variations of the model but they share many features in common. 34
    • PERSONAL WAKEUP CALL: STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR YOUR CAREER • Determine purpose/mission: Why do I exist? What kind of person am I, and what kind of person do I want to be? What do I want out of life and why? • Determine measurable goals: What are my life and career goals? How can I measure them? • Consider the future: What trends will create threats and opportunities that will affect my life/career goals? 35
    • PERSONAL WAKEUP CALL: STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR YOUR CAREER • Consider the present: What are my current strengths and areas for improvement? What do I most enjoy doing, and what am I passionate about? • Conduct a SWOT analysis for self: What do my present strengths/weaknesses and future threats/opportunities tell me about possible long- term career strategy? • Select the best strategy: What strategy has the greatest likelihood of success, and why do I think so? 36
    • PERSONAL WAKEUP CALL: STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR YOUR CAREER • Implement the strategy: How will I implement my strategy, and who can help me? • Evaluate the strategy: How do I periodically assess my progress? 37
    • PERSONAL WAKEUP CALL: TRENDS AFFECTING YOUR CAREER What trends might affect your career? Consider: •Global mobility of talent •Increasing use of technology that shifts where and how work is done •Pressure to hold down costs •Declining birth rates worldwide and increasing numbers of elderly people •The decline of traditional families worldwide •Pressure on government to do much more with far less •What other trends might affect careers in Singapore? 38
    • PERSONAL WAKEUP CALL: STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR YOUR CAREER ACTIVITY • Divide up into teams of 3 and spend 20 to 30 minutes interviewing each other • Take turns asking each person the questions shown on the preceding slides • Be prepared to share the answers from ONE person from your group when the activity is finished 39
    • A PERSONAL WAKEUP CALL: DEBRIEF OF THE ACTIVITY BASED ON THE STRATEGIC PLANNING MODEL How did ONE group member from your group answer the key questions? 40
    • PERSONAL WAKE UP CALL Consider these questions: •“What am I good at?” •“What do I like to do?” •“What am I passionate about?” •“What are my preferences, strengths, values, skills and competencies?” •“How do these preferences, strengths, values, etc. reconcile with the organizational values and culture?” •“What are my strengths that I am passionate about?” •“In what areas of my personal and professional life should I develop?” 41
    • ESTABLISHING PERSONAL GOALS • Spend about 5-15 minutes working in groups of 3. • Each of you should try to draw a line that depicts your life from birth until late in life. • Indicate what major goals you have achieved in each 3-5 year time block and be sure to include through age 65 at least. • Include both your personal and professional life. • Discuss your lines with the other people in your group and discuss how realistic the goals seem to be. • When we come back, I will ask several people to share their lines and describe them. 42
    • PART IV: CONCLUSION 43 © Copyright 2013 by William J. Rothwell
    • OBJECTIVES You should now have met the following objectives: •Define career and distinguish that from a job •Explain who is responsible for one’s career and what that responsibility means •Show increased self-awareness •Summarize possible on-the-job and off-the-job development approaches •Review available opportunities in the Singapore government 44
    • OBJECTIVES • Formulate a personal vision of the future • Develop a personal action plan for the future • Describe how to build a social network and use it effectively in career planning • Describe how to help your peers 45
    • QUESTIONS 46