Yire fabre banqueting

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Yire fabre banqueting

  1. 1. Banqueting andBanqueting andcateringcateringSan Ignacio CollegeSan Ignacio College Chapter OneChapter One The World of CateringThe World of Catering
  2. 2. Who doesnWho doesn’’t like to eatt like to eatand drink?and drink? When you plan a meeting, you want theWhen you plan a meeting, you want thefood and beverages to be tasty andfood and beverages to be tasty andabundant.abundant. You want your attendees to leave feelingYou want your attendees to leave feelingpleased that they were at the event.pleased that they were at the event.
  3. 3. Banquets and receptionsBanquets and receptionsare both social andare both social andbusiness eventsbusiness events People love to socialize and network.People love to socialize and network. All aspects of a catered function areAll aspects of a catered function areimportant.important. The quality of food, beverage, andThe quality of food, beverage, andservice makes one of the deepest andservice makes one of the deepest andmost lasting impressions on meetingmost lasting impressions on meetingattendees.attendees.
  4. 4. BanquetingBanqueting Groups generally prefer professionallyGroups generally prefer professionallyprepared and served food andprepared and served food andbeverages.beverages. This allows hosts to concentrate solelyThis allows hosts to concentrate solelyon their personal, social, and businesson their personal, social, and businessactivities while also enjoying the events.activities while also enjoying the events. And they can leave the clean up toAnd they can leave the clean up tosomeone else.someone else.
  5. 5. Business CateringBusiness Catering association conventions and meetingsassociation conventions and meetings civic meetingscivic meetings corporate sales or stockholder meetingscorporate sales or stockholder meetings recognition banquetsrecognition banquets product launchesproduct launches educational training sessionseducational training sessions seller-buyer entertainingseller-buyer entertaining service awards banquetsservice awards banquets hospitality suiteshospitality suites
  6. 6. Caterers come in allCaterers come in allsizes and shapes.sizes and shapes. There are caterers who can provideThere are caterers who can provideJapanese, Italian, French, Chinese,Japanese, Italian, French, Chinese,American, Southwest, and Seafood.American, Southwest, and Seafood. There are picnic caterers, kosherThere are picnic caterers, koshercaterers, and barbecue caterers.caterers, and barbecue caterers. Your options are endless.Your options are endless.
  7. 7. Types of CateringTypes of CateringVenuesVenues independent banquetindependent banquethallshalls civic auditoriumscivic auditoriums stadiums, arenasstadiums, arenas ethnic social clubsethnic social clubs fraternal organizationsfraternal organizations womenwomen’s clubs’s clubs private city or countryprivate city or countryclubs, athletic clubsclubs, athletic clubs hospitalshospitals universities, librariesuniversities, libraries executive dining roomsexecutive dining roomsin office buildings orin office buildings orcorporate headquarterscorporate headquarters houses of worshiphouses of worship recreation rooms in largerecreation rooms in largehousing complexeshousing complexes parksparks museums, aquariumsmuseums, aquariums restaurants with privaterestaurants with privatedining roomsdining rooms
  8. 8.  Some facilities are more competitiveSome facilities are more competitivethan hotels or conference centers, withthan hotels or conference centers, withmore flexible price structures due tomore flexible price structures due tolower overhead expenses.lower overhead expenses. Public facilities are tax-exempt.Public facilities are tax-exempt. Some facilities provide their ownSome facilities provide their owncatering in-house; others are leased tocatering in-house; others are leased toand operated by contract foodserviceand operated by contract foodservicecompanies that have exclusivecompanies that have exclusivecontracts.contracts. Some will rent their facilities to off-Some will rent their facilities to off-premise caterers.premise caterers.
  9. 9. Many meeting plannersMany meeting plannersdo not simply purchase ado not simply purchase amealmeal They buy fantasy, fun, service,They buy fantasy, fun, service,ambience, entertainment, and memories.ambience, entertainment, and memories. Buying food and beverage is only oneBuying food and beverage is only onecomponent of the fun and fantasy.component of the fun and fantasy.
  10. 10. Catering is aCatering is aconsumer-drivenconsumer-drivenmarketmarket Stimulated by clients who demand exceptionalStimulated by clients who demand exceptionalquality and excellent value for a reasonablequality and excellent value for a reasonableprice.price. Value is determined by the buyer, not theValue is determined by the buyer, not theseller.seller. BuyersBuyers’ perceptions are sellers’ realities.’ perceptions are sellers’ realities. The impression meeting planners have of aThe impression meeting planners have of apropertyproperty’s catering ability is their reality, and’s catering ability is their reality, andwill influence their buying decisions.will influence their buying decisions.
  11. 11. Most meeting plannersMost meeting plannerswill comparison shopwill comparison shop They make the best choice when theyThey make the best choice when theyperceive a facility is reliable, consistent,perceive a facility is reliable, consistent,creative, and can execute the bestcreative, and can execute the bestquality event consistent with what theyquality event consistent with what theyare able to pay.are able to pay.
  12. 12. The caterer must be ableThe caterer must be ableto take a meetingto take a meetingplanners vision of theplanners vision of thefunction (needs, wishes,function (needs, wishes,purpose of the function,purpose of the function,and budget) and developand budget) and developan event that can bean event that can bedelivered effectively anddelivered effectively andefficiently.efficiently.
  13. 13. Catering staffCatering staff Director of catering (DOC)Director of catering (DOC) Assistant catering directorAssistant catering director Catering managerCatering manager Catering sales managerCatering sales manager(CSM)(CSM) Catering sales representativeCatering sales representative Convention/conferenceConvention/conferenceservice managerservice manager Banquet managerBanquet manager Banquet setup managerBanquet setup manager Assistant banquet managerAssistant banquet manager SchedulerScheduler Maitre dMaitre d’ hotel’ hotel CaptainCaptain ServerServer Busperson (busser)Busperson (busser) Food handlerFood handler BartenderBartender BarbackBarback SommelierSommelier HousemanHouseman AttendantAttendant Clerical personClerical person EngineerEngineer CashierCashier Ticket takerTicket taker SecuritySecurity Room service managerRoom service manager
  14. 14. Banquet and cateringBanquet and cateringoperationsoperations
  15. 15. WHY DO WE LIKE TOWHY DO WE LIKE TOSELL BANQUETSSELL BANQUETS Very profitableVery profitablebusinessbusiness Every event allowsEvery event allowsfor flexibility in pricingfor flexibility in pricing Food cost are lowerFood cost are lowerdue to volumedue to volume Beverage cost easierBeverage cost easierto controlto controlLabor cost are lowerLabor cost are lowerAdditional incomeAdditional incomegeneratorgenerator(flower,bakeries,photog(flower,bakeries,photographer.rapher.
  16. 16. WHY? CONTWHY? CONT’’DD Celebrate events; sell more expensive & moreCelebrate events; sell more expensive & moreprofitable menu itemsprofitable menu items Number of guests known; greater productionNumber of guests known; greater productioncontrolscontrols Sell bar service (See TYPES a little later on)Sell bar service (See TYPES a little later on) Charge extra for labor: bartenders, cashiers &Charge extra for labor: bartenders, cashiers &servers; security; valet; coatroomservers; security; valet; coatroom
  17. 17. CANDY BUFFET!!
  18. 18. MONKEY BUFFET – WHAT THE HECK?
  19. 19. LAS VEGAS BUFFET
  20. 20. KANG KUNG KU BUFFET
  21. 21. COFFEE SHOPCOFFEE SHOPSTAFFING:STAFFING:STAFFING:STAFFING: Coffee ShopCoffee ShopManagerManager Coffee ShopCoffee ShopCashiersCashiers Hosts/HostessHosts/Hostess Cooks &Cooks &kitchen staffkitchen staff ServersServers BusBusTERMS:TERMS:Side WorkSide Work = service= servicerelated tasksrelated tasksperformed during aperformed during ashift; rollshift; rollsilverware,silverware,restock, refillrestock, refillcondiments, etc.condiments, etc.Table TurnTable Turn = the= thenumber of timesnumber of timeswewe “Meet, greet,“Meet, greet,seat, serve, paysseat, serve, payscheck & leaves incheck & leaves in
  22. 22. WHO IS YOURWHO IS YOURMARKET?MARKET? Generation X (20 somethings)Generation X (20 somethings) Generation Y ( IsnGeneration Y ( Isn’t that you?)’t that you?) Baby BoomersBaby Boomers Influentials – intellectually curious; theirInfluentials – intellectually curious; theiropinionopinion “counts”; cutting edge“counts”; cutting edge The Affluent – earn $100 - $250,000 aThe Affluent – earn $100 - $250,000 ayear; seek exceptional food, service, etc.year; seek exceptional food, service, etc.
  23. 23. PLANNING MENUS:PLANNING MENUS: Facility layout/design & equipmentFacility layout/design & equipment Available labor & skillsAvailable labor & skills Product availabilityProduct availability Quality level of clientQuality level of client Cost of food to produce menuCost of food to produce menu Pricing for clientsPricing for clients
  24. 24. BOOKING & PLANNINGBOOKING & PLANNINGEVENTSEVENTS Function room reservation formFunction room reservation form – coordinates– coordinatesthe spacethe space Contracts/letters of agreementContracts/letters of agreement – details every– details everyaspect of event. Who is doing what.aspect of event. Who is doing what. GuaranteeGuarantee Room rental ratesRoom rental rates – extra if no food or food is– extra if no food or food isnot high enoughnot high enough BEO or Function SheetBEO or Function Sheet – lists all of the details– lists all of the detailsthat apply to the function. VIP document.that apply to the function. VIP document.Nothing gets done without it. Signatures;Nothing gets done without it. Signatures;billing. Contract.billing. Contract.
  25. 25. BEVERAGEBEVERAGESERVICE/BARS &SERVICE/BARS &FUNCTIONSFUNCTIONSTYPES:TYPES:Cash BarCash Bar – guests pay cash– guests pay cashHost Bar/DrinkHost Bar/Drink – Guests do not pay; Charge the– Guests do not pay; Charge thehost by the drink; system to track; tickethost by the drink; system to track; ticketHost Bar/BottleHost Bar/Bottle – Charge by # of bottles– Charge by # of bottlesconsumed/opened; par; agreed upon priceconsumed/opened; par; agreed upon priceHost Bar/HourHost Bar/Hour – Charge host fixed fee per– Charge host fixed fee perperson per hour; estimate guest consumptionperson per hour; estimate guest consumptionWine ServiceWine Service – servers can serve or bartenders– servers can serve or bartenderscan pourcan pour
  26. 26. DemonstrationDemonstration Set up for Breakfast BuffetSet up for Breakfast Buffet Ready to do it.Ready to do it.
  27. 27. Week# 2Week# 2 Food Service IndustryFood Service Industry What is Service? And how relate to theWhat is Service? And how relate to thehospitality Industry?hospitality Industry? Service isService is
  28. 28. HOTEL A – LA –HOTEL A – LA –CARTE DININGCARTE DININGROOMSROOMS
  29. 29. TYPES OF HOTEL A –TYPES OF HOTEL A –LA – CARTE DININGLA – CARTE DINING Coffee ShopCoffee Shop Casual/Theme/Celebrity RestaurantsCasual/Theme/Celebrity Restaurants Fine DiningFine Dining Bars & LoungesBars & Lounges
  30. 30. WHO IS YOURWHO IS YOURMARKET?MARKET? Generation X (20 somethings)Generation X (20 somethings) Generation Y ( IsnGeneration Y ( Isn’t that you?)’t that you?) Baby BoomersBaby Boomers Influentials – intellectually curious; theirInfluentials – intellectually curious; theiropinionopinion “counts”; cutting edge“counts”; cutting edge The Affluent – earn $100 - $250,000 aThe Affluent – earn $100 - $250,000 ayear; seek exceptional food, service, etc.year; seek exceptional food, service, etc.
  31. 31. ELEMENTS OF COFFEEELEMENTS OF COFFEESHOPSHOP Bright, lively informalBright, lively informalatmosphereatmosphere Cheerful & efficientCheerful & efficientserviceservice Well-prepared &Well-prepared &presented foodpresented food Quick serviceQuick service Low pricesLow prices Quite busing ofQuite busing oftableware & dishestableware & dishes
  32. 32. COFFEESHOPS
  33. 33. COFFEE SHOP
  34. 34. COFFEE SHOP
  35. 35. COFFEE SHOP
  36. 36. MENUMENUCHARACTERISTICSCHARACTERISTICS California menuCalifornia menuoptionsoptions Variety/SelectionVariety/Selection Price valuePrice value Portion valuePortion value Presentation valuePresentation value BeveragesBeverages
  37. 37. How caterers priceHow caterers price Three general types of pricing methodsThree general types of pricing methodsused by caterers:used by caterers: thirds methodthirds method contribution margin (CM) methodcontribution margin (CM) method multiplier methodmultiplier method
  38. 38. The thirds methodThe thirds method Calculating a per-person price that will coverCalculating a per-person price that will coverthree things equally:three things equally:1.1. the cost of food, beverage, and other supplies (such asthe cost of food, beverage, and other supplies (such asnapery, dance floor, etc.);napery, dance floor, etc.);2.2. the cost of payroll to handle the function, plus overheadthe cost of payroll to handle the function, plus overheadexpenses needed to open the room (such as turning onexpenses needed to open the room (such as turning onthe air conditioning units, etc.); andthe air conditioning units, etc.); and3.3. profit.profit. With a $30.00 price per-person, the caterer willWith a $30.00 price per-person, the caterer willhave approx. $20.00 to cover expenses, leaving ahave approx. $20.00 to cover expenses, leaving a$10.00 profit from each guest.$10.00 profit from each guest. The caterer will also add taxes and gratuities (orThe caterer will also add taxes and gratuities (orservice charges) to this price.service charges) to this price.
  39. 39. The contributionThe contributionmargin (CM) methodmargin (CM) method This is the typical pricing method used byThis is the typical pricing method used bylarge caterers.large caterers. Everything must make a profit.Everything must make a profit. It is too difficult for large caterers to buildIt is too difficult for large caterers to buildeach party from scratch, so it iseach party from scratch, so it isnecessary to standardize some things.necessary to standardize some things.
  40. 40. The contributionThe contributionmargin (CM) methodmargin (CM) method The caterer must know as much asThe caterer must know as much aspossible all the expenses associated withpossible all the expenses associated with“opening the room,” apart from the types“opening the room,” apart from the typesof menu items meeting planners willof menu items meeting planners willorder.order. These are essentially fixed cateringThese are essentially fixed cateringexpenses, such as salaries and wages,expenses, such as salaries and wages,utilities, paper products, and marketing.utilities, paper products, and marketing.
  41. 41. The contributionThe contributionmargin (CM) methodmargin (CM) method These total fixed expenses must be divided byThese total fixed expenses must be divided bythe number of attendees expected for a year.the number of attendees expected for a year. This gives the caterer a reasonable estimate ofThis gives the caterer a reasonable estimate ofthe amount of fixed expense per attendee.the amount of fixed expense per attendee. To this number is added the per-person costTo this number is added the per-person costfor the food, beverage, and other variable costsfor the food, beverage, and other variable costs(such as special linen) that comes with a(such as special linen) that comes with aparticular catering menu option.particular catering menu option.
  42. 42. The contributionThe contributionmargin (CM) methodmargin (CM) method Once the caterer knows how much theOnce the caterer knows how much thetotal variable and fixed expense is pertotal variable and fixed expense is perperson, the desired profit margin is thenperson, the desired profit margin is thenadded to each menu option.added to each menu option.
  43. 43. The multiplier methodThe multiplier method This is a version of the contributionThis is a version of the contributionmargin (CM) method.margin (CM) method. Once it is established, the caterer thenOnce it is established, the caterer thenmultiplies it by a factor that usually variesmultiplies it by a factor that usually variesfrom about 3 to 7, but can go higherfrom about 3 to 7, but can go higher
  44. 44. The multiplier methodThe multiplier method The factor is related to the type of services,The factor is related to the type of services,ambience, and so forth, provided to attendees.ambience, and so forth, provided to attendees. The more expensive, the higher the factor will be.The more expensive, the higher the factor will be. The factor can be independent of these variables;The factor can be independent of these variables;during the high season, even modest caterers canduring the high season, even modest caterers cancommand a high price.command a high price. The factor, and the price, are influenced byThe factor, and the price, are influenced bycompetition and what the market will bear.competition and what the market will bear. It will be as high as possible.It will be as high as possible. To the caterer, there is no such thing as a price thatTo the caterer, there is no such thing as a price thatis too high.is too high.
  45. 45. Popular Up-scale Value BasedChicken per-personPicatta$ 24.00Oscar$ 32.00Dijon$ 22.00Staff B-team$500.00A-team$700.00C-team$400.00Linen Color Overlays WhiteChair rental Stacking$850.00Ballroom$1400.00Padded$600.00Floral Roses$400.00Orchids$600.00Carnations$300.00Music Duo$550.00Trio$750.00Solo$375.00Level pricingLevel pricing
  46. 46. Range pricingRange pricingPrime Rib Dinner Number of guests Price per guest235 or less $29.75236-265 $27.45266 and up $24.25
  47. 47. The catererThe caterer’’ssobjectivesobjectives Earn a fair profit, consistent with theEarn a fair profit, consistent with theamount of money invested in the cateringamount of money invested in the cateringbusiness.business. Generate sufficient catering salesGenerate sufficient catering salesrevenues to accomplish the above, torevenues to accomplish the above, tocover all operating expenses, and tocover all operating expenses, and tohave enough money left over to reinvesthave enough money left over to reinvestin the business.in the business. Ensure customer satisfaction.Ensure customer satisfaction.
  48. 48. The catererThe caterer’’ssobjectivesobjectives Provide consistent quality and service.Provide consistent quality and service. Convey a particular image.Convey a particular image. Develop a reputation for dependability,Develop a reputation for dependability,flexibility, and solving problems.flexibility, and solving problems. Stay on budget.Stay on budget.
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