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Term 4 Week 1

Term 4 Week 1

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Term 4 week 1 chimps and birds of paradise Term 4 week 1 chimps and birds of paradise Presentation Transcript

  • Term 4 Week 1.2011 Final Practice Paper 2 Before EOY.2011 Secondary 3NA Prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee Question 16 Summary Writing
  • Passage B Q16• The passage talks about the problems facing the birds of paradise in Indonesia. Using your own words as far as possible, summarise all the various threats and dangers facing these beautiful birds and the efforts of John Manangsang to save them.• USE ONLY THE MATERIAL FROM LINE 6 TO LINE 48.• “Birds of paradise are coveted for their beautiful feathers which…”
  • POINTS ORGANISERThreats and dangers Manangsang’s effortsfacing these beautiful to save them.birdsA1 A? B1 B? View slide
  • SUMMARY: Passage B Paragraph 1• Indonesia is a bird paradise, but hundreds of its 366 protected species of the beautiful birds of paradise (known as cendrawasih) are threatened by habitat destruction and illegal activity. Logging is partly to blame but the biggest threat is illegal poaching and smuggling. Among the smugglers are ill-paid Indonesian troops who know that a bird of paradise dead or alive will fetch five to ten times more in Java or Sumatra where they are then sold and their beautiful feathers turned into women’s hats in Europe. Officers of the tiny force of 57 forest rangers search troop ships preparing to sail and hear birds chirping in every corner but cannot act against armed men. View slide
  • Starting line of theSUMMARY QUESTION Q16
  • POINTS ORGANISER[A] Threats and [B] Manangsang’sdangers facing these efforts to save them.beautiful birds[1] feathers turned intowomen’s hats inEurope.[2] Forest rangers canonly search but cannotact against armedsoldiers.
  • SUMMARY: Passage B Paragraph 2• Worse, officials in Papua buy birds of paradise as gifts or bribes to visiting dignitaries. “At this rate, the birds are doomed,” states Widodo Ramono, director of biodiversity conservation in the Ministry of Forestry. Nobody knows better than John Manangsang about the callous fate that these birds suffer. A general practitioner, Manangsang had a busy health clinic on the outskirts of Jayapura. One evening, in July 1996, Manangsang’s world changed when a student brought him a box, asking, “Do you want to buy it?”
  • POINTS ORGANISER[A] Threats and [B] Manangsang’sdangers facing these efforts to save them.beautiful birds[3] officials in Papuabuy birds of paradiseas gifts or bribes tovisiting dignitaries.[4] Anybody canattempt to trade theircatch.
  • SUMMARY: Passage B Paragraph 3• Cramped into the box was a lesser bird of paradise with a limp wing, the fifth bird the student had shot to pay his way through university. When Manangsang saw the fear and pain in its brilliant eye, something in his heart turned over. After beating the price down to 400,000 rupiahs (then about $170), he took the bird into his surgery. The bird’s mauve talons dug into Manangsang’s fingers drawing blood. His wife prised them loose and taped the bird’s jabbing beak closed. Now Manangsang could spread the broken wing. There were no vets to consult but he saw what he had to do. Soon, soldiers and police brought more and more birds. Manangsang built a three-storey aviary in his clinic’s courtyard. Even this huge cage, its trees hung with fruit for the birds, filled up with heartbreaking speed.
  • POINTS ORGANISER[A] Threats and [B] Manangsang’sdangers facing these efforts to save them.beautiful birds[5] Amateur hunters do not know [1] He bargained hard to savehow to cage the captured birds the first bird.properly. [2] He attended to its broken[6] There was no vets to consult. wing.[7] The police and army [3] He constructed andpersonnel brought more and maintained a three-storey aviarymore birds. to keep the birds.
  • SUMMARY: Passage B Paragraph 4• Quickly Manangsang learnt how to stitch a bird’s wounds without damaging its feathers before releasing it at a secret location when it healed. At first, his bird patients suffered injuries mainly from bullets and arrows. Some were caught in glue smeared on trees. As many as five birds trapped on one branch could die of injuries inflicted by their frantic struggles. Then the character of the injuries changed and Manangsang realised the hunters were now using nets strung between branches near the leks (nests), where colourful males compete for the attention of the females. More females turned up, caught while visiting the leks to mate. Soon, Manangsang’s patients gave him a new name – Doctor Cendrawasih. But not everyone in Papua was happy with his activities.
  • POINTS ORGANISER[A] Threats and dangers facing [B] Manangsang’s efforts to savethese beautiful birds them.[8] At first, his bird patients suffered [4] He learnt how toinjuries mainly from bullets andarrows. stitch a bird’s wounds[9] Some were caught in gluesmeared on trees. [5] without damaging[10] Trapped birds could die of its feathersinjuries inflicted by their franticstruggles. [6] before releasing it[11] Nets were strung between at a secret locationbranches near nests where matingtakes place. when it healed[12] More females were caught.
  • SUMMARY: Passage B Paragraph 5• Though laws against possession of protected birds had existed since 1990, not a single case had reached the courts. This changed dramatically one morning in 1998. As Manangsang prepared for the day’s stream of patients, the clinic was surrounded by the police who charged him with possession of birds of paradise. Though facing up to ten years in jail and a $50000 fine, he was undaunted and fought his own case. It dragged on for a year but he won.
  • POINTS ORGANISERThreats and dangers Manangsang’s effortsfacing these beautiful to save them.birds[13] Bird protection [7] He won his caselaws were against illegalineffective. possession of birds.
  • END LINE of Q16
  • SUMMARY: Passage B Paragraph 6• Home again, Manangsang, together with 100 university experts, tribal chiefs and local politicians, devised a conservation plan for 30000 hectares of land around nearby Lake Sentani. Their vision was a paradise for people and birds, with fruit and orchid farms, providing a habitat and the economy benefiting from tourists. The plan was ignored. Instead, the government opened another four million hectares for logging.
  • POINTS ORGANISER[A] Threats and [B] Manangsang’sdangers facing these efforts to save them.beautiful birds[14] The government [8] Manangsang, university experts, tribal chiefs and politicians, devised aignored their plan and conservation plan for 30000 hectares ofopened another four land around nearby Lake Sentani.million hectares for [9] Their vision was a paradise for peoplelogging. and birds, with fruit and orchid farms, providing a habitat and the economy benefiting from tourists.
  • WARNING 1USE YOUR OWN WORDSONLY IF YOU AREABSOLUTELY CERTAINTHAT BY DOING SO, YOUDO NOT CHANGE THEMEANING OF THEORIGINAL TEXT.
  • WARNING 2DO NOT FORGETTO USE THEHELPINGWORDS TOPROVIDEYOUR FIRSTPOINT.
  • The Helping Words for this summary are:Birds of paradise arecoveted for their beautifulfeathers which…
  • Linking the Helping Words with the Point A1… Birds of paradise are coveted for their beautiful feathers which… + [A1]feathers turned into women’s hats inEurope.
  • Let’s put the content points together[A2] Forest rangers [A4] Anybody cancan only search but attempt to trade theircannot act against catch.armed soldiers.[A3] officials in Papua [A5] Amateur huntersbuy birds of paradise as do not know how togifts or bribes to cage the captured birdsvisiting dignitaries. properly.
  • [A6] There was no [A8] At first, his birdvets to consult. patients suffered injuries mainly from bullets and arrows.[A7] The police [A9] Some wereand army caught in gluepersonnel brought smeared on trees.more and morebirds.
  • [A10] Trapped [A12] Morebirds could die of females wereinjuries inflicted caught.by their franticstruggles.[A11] Nets were [A13] Bird protectionstrung between laws werebranches near nests ineffective.where mating takesplace.
  • [A14] The government [B2] Heattended toignored their plan andopened another four its broken wing.million hectares forlogging.[B1] He [B3] Hebargained hard to constructed andsave the first bird. maintained a three-storey aviary to keep the birds.
  • [B4] He learnt how to [B6] before releasing itstitch a bird’s wounds at a secret location when it healed[B5] without damaging [B7] He won hisits feathers case against illegal possession of birds.
  • [A8] Manangsang,university experts, tribalchiefs and politicians,devised a conservationplan for 30000 hectares ofland around nearby LakeSentani.[A9] Their vision was aparadise for people andbirds, with fruit andorchid farms, providinga habitat and theeconomy benefitingfrom tourists.