Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Summary Writing                            Prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee for 3NA classesPOST-MORTEM – Term 2 Week 5 Class Test ...
Summary Writing                            Prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee for 3NA classes POST-MORTEM – Term 2 Week 5 Class Test...
Summary Writing                            Prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee for 3NA classesPOST-MORTEM – Term 2 Week 5 Class Test ...
Summary Writing                            Prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee for 3NA classesPOST-MORTEM – Term 2 Week 5 Class Test ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

T2 w5.paper 2 class test2.mongolian and their horses summary steps 1 to 5

435

Published on

How to get to 150 words

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
435
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "T2 w5.paper 2 class test2.mongolian and their horses summary steps 1 to 5"

  1. 1. Summary Writing Prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee for 3NA classesPOST-MORTEM – Term 2 Week 5 Class Test 2 _ Mongolians and Their Horses1 Horses whinny outside. Birds whoop. I struggle against the early-morning cold and trudge to the crest of a nearby ridge and watch daybreak extend its hold on miles of green, hilly openness punctuated by the occasional cluster of cattle. As I descend I watch the horses gambol on the slopes. I grew up riding, and my father would tell me stories of Genghis Khan and his great equestrian warriors.2 I have read somewhere about a Mongolian proverb that says, “a Mongol without a horse is like a bird without wings”, and remember that a Mongol euphemism for going to the bathroom is to “go see my horse”. Mongolian nomadic culture is intensely linked to horses. Mongolian children grow up with horses, becoming skilful riders before they are five. The horse and the nomadic lifestyle enabled the Mongols led by Genghis Khan and his descendants to amass the largest empire the world has ever known. The horse is the most practical form of transportation in Mongolia. It is a pleasure to be unconstrained by roads or traffic lights, and free to go in any direction!3 After breakfast, I mount a runty black Mongolian pony and spur it across a table of green grass. Its tack consists of primitive rope reins and a crude wooden saddle with a metal pommel and stunted stirrups. Despite my best attempt at the Mongolian supplication for equine speed – it sounds like “tchoo, tchoo” – I go a very little way very slowly.4 Shortly after I dismount, we pull out of camp as sheep spill down the slopes like ants on hot sand and a modern herdsman sits astride a motorcycle preparing to gather his cattle. I recall what our guide said earlier, “These days, you These can’t really eke out a living from simply herding cattle. Yet, there’s little else to do here. Many look beyond to supplement what cattle supplement making.” they already are making.5 Several miles down the road we encounter a nomadic family – who has one foot in the old world – herding – and another in the modern world, mining The grandparents own the two gers and are hosting for the short three-month mining. summer break their 38-year-old daughter (seven other grown children are scattered throughout Mongolia) and her three seven Mongolia children – the youngest is a one-month-old in a stroller and the oldest is Bulgaa, sixteen, who has a cell phone in her front one-month- pocket. Father is at home 250 miles away in Erdenet, a mining town that boasts the world’s fourth largest copper deposit. His salary has helped make them well-off by steppe standards. The main ger comfortably seats a dozen and we are served well- milk green milk tea, goat cheese, yogurt, bread, and aarwl – a milk and sugar candy.6 A small TV is tuned to Mongolia’s Super Bowl, the Nadaam Festival. This festival is also locally termed, “the three games of Festival men”. The age-old games are Mongolian wrestling, horse racing and archery which are held throughout the country during the midsummer holidays. On the wall, a Mickey Mouse clock tells the time A freezer serves as table time. and for food storage. Bulgaa, who chews gum as we speak, has a computer at home (and an email address and High 5 online an profile), and speaks English superbly. Despite the economic pull of the city, at least today she recognizes the power of her grandparents’ nomadic roots. “I like the country better than the city. It is prettier and freer. And the air is so fresh.” She does admit, though, that she has little time to relax here – she must collect dung and feed it to the stove and help herd the cattle. Despite her father’s mining work, the livestock remain central to the family’s life which is why Bulgaa life, scored a linguistic coup when she asked her grandmother: Uher mal targan uu? (Are the cattle fattening well?)7 When we leave we pass a solitary basketball hoop and, then, the Ghengis Khan Golf Course with its condo-like apartments. condo- Another country club looms ahead Here and there are satellite dishes We have been told that the Japanese and South ahead. dishes. Koreans are investing heavily in Mongolian tourism, building more and more camps and hotels. I look at the mostly virgin hills, the vast open spaces, and wonder how long it will be before full-blown resorts push the herders off their ancestral lands. *gers – portable felt dwelling structures used by nomads. Adapted from The Steppes Of Mongolia by Keith Bellows, National Geographic Blog8 The passage above gives an insight into the Mongol’s traditional and modern way of living through the [25] writer’s travelling experiences. Using your own words as far as possible, summarise what the writer observes and learns about the Mongols’ traditional and modern ways of living. USE THE MATERIAL IN THE PASSAGE. Your summary, which must be in continuous prose (not note form), must not be more than 150 words (not counting the words given to help you to begin). Begin your summary as follows: The Mongols, through the lenses of the author, lead a … 1
  2. 2. Summary Writing Prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee for 3NA classes POST-MORTEM – Term 2 Week 5 Class Test 2 _ Mongolians and Their HorsesSTEP 1: Understanding what is it the question wants me to summariseThe passage above gives an insight into the Mongol’s traditional and modern way of living through the writer’s travelling experiences.Using your own words as far as possible, summarise what the writer observes and learns about the Mongols’ traditional and modern waysof living.USE THE MATERIAL IN THE PASSAGE.Your summary, which must be in continuous prose (not note form), must not be more than 150 words (not counting the words given tohelp you to begin).Begin your summary as follows:The Mongols, through the lenses of the author, lead a …STEP 2: Jotting down the relevant points What the writer SEES and LEARNS about(A) The Mongols’ traditional ways of living (B) The Mongol’s modern ways of living1 miles of green, hilly openness punctuated by the 1 modern herdsman sits astride a motorcycle occasional cluster of cattle – a charming pastoral preparing to gather his cattle scene2 Horses gambol on the slopes 2 These days, you can’t really eke out a living from simply herding cattle3 Mongolian nomadic culture is intensely linked to 3 Many look beyond to supplement what they horses already are making4 Mongolian children grow up with horses 4 Modern livelihood – mining5 becoming skilful riders before they are five 5 Grownup grandchildren are likely to be scattered throughout Mongolia6 The horse is the most practical form of 6 Parents seek work beyond the grasslands transportation in Mongolia7 the Mongolian supplication for equine speed 7 the youngest is a one-month-old in a stroller8 Traditional livelihood – herding 8 Teenagers carry cell phones9 The grandparents own the two gers 9 Parental income makes families well-off by steppe standards10 we are served green milk tea, goat cheese, yogurt, 10 Watching the Nadaam Festival via television bread, and aarwl – a milk and sugar candy11 The age-old games are Mongolian wrestling, horse 11 Mickey Mouse clock, freezer, computer, chewing racing and archery which are held throughout the gums, internet access, email address, use of country during the midsummer holidays English12 Young people collect dung and feed it to the stove 12 Livestock is core business despite mining and help herd the cattle.13 Grandchild still speaks Mongolian to grandparents 13 a solitary basketball hoop 14 Golf Course with its condo-like apartments, country clubs 15 Satellite dishes 16 the Japanese and South Koreans are investing heavily in Mongolian tourism, building more and more camps and hotels 2
  3. 3. Summary Writing Prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee for 3NA classesPOST-MORTEM – Term 2 Week 5 Class Test 2 _ Mongolians and Their HorsesSTEP 3: From Points to Sentences to construct DRAFT ONEThe Mongols, through the lenses of the author, lead a …miles of green, hilly openness punctuated by the occasional cluster of cattle – a charming pastoral sceneHorses gambol on the slopesMongolian nomadic culture is intensely linked to horsesMongolian children grow up with horsesbecoming skilful riders before they are fiveThe horse is the most practical form of transportation in Mongoliathe Mongolian supplication for equine speedTraditional livelihood – herdingThe grandparents own the two gerswe are served green milk tea, goat cheese, yogurt, bread, and aarwl – a milk and sugar candyThe age-old games are Mongolian wrestling, horse racing and archery which are held throughout the countryduring the midsummer holidaysYoung people collect dung and feed it to the stove and help herd the cattle.Grandchild still speaks Mongolian to grandparentsmodern herdsman sits astride a motorcycle preparing to gather his cattleThese days, you can’t really eke out a living from simply herding cattleMany look beyond to supplement what they already are makingModern livelihood – miningGrownup grandchildren are likely to be scattered throughout MongoliaParents seek work beyond the grasslandsthe youngest is a one-month-old in a strollerTeenagers carry cell phonesParental income makes families well-off by steppe standardsWatching the Nadaam Festival via televisionMickey Mouse clock, freezer, computer, chewing gums, internet access, email address, use of EnglishLivestock is core business despite mininga solitary basketball hoopGolf Course with its condo-like apartments, country clubsSatellite dishesthe Japanese and South Koreans are investing heavily in Mongolian tourism, building more and more camps andhotelsSTEP 4: From Points to Sentences to construct DRAFT ONESTEP 5: From DRAFT ONE TO FINAL DRAFTThe Mongols, through the lenses of the author, lead a traditional livelihood byadopting a nomadic and pastoral lifestyle herding cattle on horsebacks inthe steppes. Their children grow up with horses, becoming skilful ridersbefore they are five. Mongolians need horses for transportation andworship equine speed. Grandparents live in gers and serve guests withsimple countryside treats while their grownup children may live anywherein Mongolia. The annual midsummer Nadaam festival featuring Mongoliangames is televised. Youngsters collect dung to fire furnace and help toherd cattle. They still communicate in the Mongolian language with theirelders. Modern herdsmen gather cattle on motorcycles. The livestockbusiness is key business but mining has become important. Theysupplement their income with other jobs elsewhere. Their children haveaccess to modern products easily and some speak excellent English. TheMongolian landscape continues to modernise as golf courses with condo-like apartments, country clubs, camps and hotels are being constructed byforeign investors. (150 words)Summarised by Kuronekosan 3
  4. 4. Summary Writing Prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee for 3NA classesPOST-MORTEM – Term 2 Week 5 Class Test 2 _ Mongolians and Their Horses 4

×