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T1 w7 sure fail examintaions - from nothing to draft 4 T1 w7 sure fail examintaions - from nothing to draft 4 Presentation Transcript

  • T1W7.2011.Summary Writing prepared by Kuronekosan for 3D / 3C / 3B.2011 at S.H.S.S. How to Ace Summary Writing prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 1 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 1 Many parents feel stressed whentheir children sit high-stakes examinationslike the Primary School LeavingExaminations or the O or A LevelExaminations. They feel responsible fortheir children’s performance. Evenbalanced parents, who understand thattheir role is mainly a supportive one, feelas stressed as though they are taking thetest themselves. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 2 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 1 Many parents feel stressed whentheir children sit high-stakesexaminations like the Primary SchoolLeaving Examinations or the O or A LevelExaminations. They feel responsible fortheir children’s performance. Evenbalanced parents, who understand thattheir role is mainly a supportive one, feelas stressed as though they are taking thetest themselves. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 3 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 1 Major or very importantContinually worrried orContinually anxious Many parents feel stressed when their children Take sit high-stakes examinations like the Primary School Leaving Examinations or the O or A Level Examinations. They feelAccountable responsible for their children’s performance. Even balanced Rational or parents, who understand that reasonable their role is mainly a supportive one, feel as stressed as though they are taking the test themselves. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 4 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 2 Schools should be an ally in thegruelling preparation for this major race.Unfortunately, many see their roledifferently. Many schools use shock scaretactics which are remarkably outdated. Iam talking about the habit of many schoolsto set mid-year examination papers of anunduly high difficult level. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 5 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 2 Schools should be an ally in thegruelling preparation for this major race.Unfortunately, many see their roledifferently. Many schools use shock scaretactics which are remarkably outdated. Iam talking about the habit of many schoolsto set mid-year examination papers of anunduly high difficult level. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 6 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 2 Very difficult and tiring / Very challenging Schools should be anSupporter ally in the gruelling preparation for this major race. Unfortunately, many see their role differently. Many schoolsUnusually or use shock scare tactics whichsurprisingly are remarkably outdated. I am talking about the habit of many schools to set mid-year examination papers of an Overly unduly high difficult level. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 7 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 3 A friend who is a fulltime mother andcoaches her son personally was aghastwhen he scored just above 50 marks in hisMathematics paper in a mission primaryschool. However, the teacher assured herthat it was a very good score, consideringthe average score across the entire schoolwas 40-something. In other words, morethan half the school failed the paper. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 8 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 3 A friend who is a fulltime mother andcoaches her son personally was aghastwhen he scored just above 50 marks in hisMathematics paper in a mission primaryschool. However, the teacher assuredher that it was a very good score,considering the average score across theentire school was 40-something. In otherwords, more than half the school failed thepaper. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 9 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 3 Terrified / horrified / Dismayed / stunned / Shocked / appalled A friend who is a fulltime mother and coaches her son personally was aghast when he scored just above 50 marks in his Mathematics paper in a missionConvinced / primary school. However, thepersuaded teacher assured her that it was a very good score, considering the average score across the entire school was 40-something. In other words, more than half the school failed the paper. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 10 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 4 Many schools set mid-year-examination papers at an unrealisticallyhigh level of difficulty, deliberately to “jolt”students and parents into a state of panicto work harder for the PSLE or O levelexaminations. When the preliminaryexaminations roll around later this year,the same pattern will repeat itself. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 11 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 4 Many schools set mid-year-examination papers at an unrealisticallyhigh level of difficulty, deliberately to “jolt”students and parents into a state of panicto work harder for the PSLE or O levelexaminations. When the preliminaryexaminations roll around later this year,the same pattern will repeat itself. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 12 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 4 Many schools set mid- year-examination papers at anIntentionally / unrealistically high level of difficulty,Purposely deliberately to “jolt” students and parents into a state of panic to work harder for the PSLE or O level examinations. When the preliminary examinations roll around later this year, the same pattern will repeat itself. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 13 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 5 Thousands of students will be in tearsover unwonted failing grades. Thousands ofparents’ stress levels will rise, fearing theirchildren wil do as badly in the PSLE or Olevels, as they did for their preliminaryexaminations. I am not familiar with theteaching pedagogy but it seems sheer badeducational practice to intentionally set anexamination paper which seeks to fail moststudents. That is not education; that ispsychological manipulation of a rathernegative and perverse nature. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 14 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 5 Thousands of students will be in tearsover unwonted failing grades. Thousands ofparents’ stress levels will rise, fearing theirchildren wil do as badly in the PSLE or Olevels, as they did for their preliminaryexaminations. I am not familiar with theteaching pedagogy but it seems sheer badeducational practice to intentionally set anexamination paper which seeks to fail moststudents. That is not education; that ispsychological manipulation of a rathernegative and perverse nature. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 15 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 5 Thousands of students will be in tears over Unusual and unwonted failing grades. unexpected Thousands of parents’ stress levels will rise, fearing their children wil do as badly in the PSLE or O levels, as Plainly / purely / they did for their preliminary unquestionably/ examinations. I am not undeniably familiar with the teachingThe practice or pedagogy but it seems sheerstudy of teaching bad educational practice to intentionally set an examination paper which seeks to fail most students. That is not education; that is psychological Mental Influence manipulation of a rather negative and perverse Bizarre / strange / nature. by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 prepared 16 odd / queer / unusual February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 6 This practice of setting punitively difficult examinations inschools has been around for years. Schools justify it by saying thata little bit of failure spurs students to try harder. They may argue thepractice results in better grades. However, people who argue thisforget the impact of repeated failure on a child’s motivation and self-esteem. Top students who score 75 instead of their customary 90 ina particularly difficult paper may indeed feel motivated to workharder to bridge the gap. However, what about the impact ofrepeated failure on the average child? A borderline student whofluctuates between a B and C, is likely to be pushed into a sea of redink when confronted with an exceptionally difficult examination.Demoralised, goaded by fear, the child works harder. Teachersraise the spectre of failure to coax the child to try harder. Tutors addon extra sessions. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 17 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 6 This practice of setting punitively difficult examinations inschools has been around for years. Schools justify it by saying thata little bit of failure spurs students to try harder. They may arguethe practice results in better grades. However, people who arguethis forget the impact of repeated failure on a child’s motivation andself-esteem. Top students who score 75 instead of their customary90 in a particularly difficult paper may indeed feel motivated to workharder to bridge the gap. However, what about the impact ofrepeated failure on the average child? A borderline student whofluctuates between a B and C, is likely to be pushed into a sea of redink when confronted with an exceptionally difficult examination.Demoralised, goaded by fear, the child works harder. Teachersraise the spectre of failure to coax the child to try harder. Tutorsadd on extra sessions. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 18 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 6 Defend / explain / rationalise Severely / harshly / unusually This practice of setting punitively Of a punish nature difficult examinations in schools has been around for years. Schools justify it by saying that a little bit of failure spurs students to try harder. They may argue the practice results in better grades. However, people who argue Encourages / Effect this forget the impact of repeated failure on a child’s motivation and self-esteem. Top motivates / drives students who score 75 instead of their customary 90 in a particularly difficult paperUsual / normal may indeed feel motivated to work harder to bridge the gap. However, what about the Forewarning / shadow impact of repeated failure on the average child? A borderline student who fluctuates Premonition / bad vibes / Close between a B and C, is likely to be pushed into Omen a sea of red ink when confronted with an exceptionally difficult examination. Demoralised, goaded by fear, the child works Persuade harder. Teachers raise the spectre of failure Swings to coax the child to try harder. Tutors add on extra sessions. Induced / prompted / motivated / Driven prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 19 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 7 My question to those principals and teachers outthere blithely setting examination papers they know moststudents will fail in: Is the child, in such a state above, ina good frame of mind to take a high-stakes nationalexaminations? Some principals and teachers who usethis “fail-them” examination scare tactic will point out thatit has worked for years, and raises the school’s averagescores in PSLE. My retort to that is simple: Yourschool’s aggregate average grades may improve buthow many vulnerable children’s self-esteem have youdestroyed in the process? Just as pertinently, how manychildren’s zest for learning have you destroyed? Howmany individual students ended up doing worse, notbetter, because of anxiety and stress? prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 20 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 7 My question to those principals and teachers outthere blithely setting examination papers they knowmost students will fail in: Is the child, in such a stateabove, in a good frame of mind to take a high-stakesnational examinations? Some principals and teacherswho use this “fail-them” examination scare tactic willpoint out that it has worked for years, and raises theschool’s average scores in PSLE. My retort to that issimple: Your school’s aggregate average grades mayimprove but how many vulnerable children’s self-esteem have you destroyed in the process? Just aspertinently, how many children’s zest for learning haveyou destroyed in the process? How many individualstudents ended up doing worse, not better, because ofanxiety and stress? prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 21 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 7 Lightheartedly / Strategy / In a carefree manner game plan My question to those principals and teachers out there blithely setting examination papers they know most students will fail in: Is the child, in such a state above, in a good frame Total of mind to take a high-stakes national examinations? Some principals and teachers who use this “fail-them” examination scare tacticReply / response / will point out that it has worked for years, and Self-respect / raises the school’s average scores in PSLE. Mycounterargument retort to that is simple: Your school’s aggregate Self-confidence average grades may improve but how many vulnerable children’s self-esteem have you Relevant / destroyed in the process? Just as pertinently,Defenseless / how many children’s zest for learning have you RelatedHelpless / destroyed? How many individual students ended up doing worse, not better, because of anxietysusceptible and stress? Interest Worries and concerns prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 22 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 8 The Ministry of Education should monitor anddiscourage this perverse practice. Guidelinesshould spell out the difficulty level of schoolpreparatory examinations, to align them with theactual standards of milestone examinations.Schools with large numbers of students whoconsistently fail mid-year and preliminaryexaminations, but who go on to do well at PSLE or Olevels, should not be praised for their students’“improved” results, but should instead bequestioned on why their internal schoolexaminations are so out of whack with the nationalones. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 23 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 8 The Ministry of Education should monitor anddiscourage this perverse practice. Guidelinesshould spell out the difficulty level of schoolpreparatory examinations, to align them with theactual standards of milestone examinations.Schools with large numbers of students whoconsistently fail mid-year and preliminaryexaminations, but who go on to do well at PSLE or Olevels, should not be praised for their students’“improved” results, but should instead bequestioned on why their internal schoolexaminations are so out of whack with the nationalones. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 24 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 8 The Ministry of Educationshould monitor and discourage thisperverse practice. Guidelines shouldspell out the difficulty level of schoolpreparatory examinations, to align themwith the actual standards of milestoneexaminations. Schools with largenumbers of students who consistentlyfail mid-year and preliminaryexaminations, but who go on to do wellat PSLE or O levels, should not bepraised for their students’ “improved”results, but should instead bequestioned on why their internal schoolexaminations are so out of whack withthe national ones. Not working together correctly prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 25 February 2011
  • SUMMARY QUESTION• Passage B discusses the effects of “sure fail” examinations on students, parents and schools.•• Using your own words as far as possible, summarise what the author thinks are the effects of setting “sure fail” examinations and what should be done to discourage such practice.• USE THE MATERIAL IN PASSAGE B FROM PARAGRAPH 5 TO PARAGRAPH 8.• Your summary, which must be in continuous writing (not note form), must not be longer than 150 words (not counting the words given to help you begin).• Begin your summary as follows: One effect “sure fail” examinations bring about is … [25 m] Word Doc prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 26 February 2011
  • SUMMARY QUESTION• Passage B discusses the effects of “sure fail” examinations on students, parents and schools.•• Using your own words as far as possible, summarise what the author thinks are the effects of setting “sure fail” examinations and what should be done to discourage such practice.• USE THE MATERIAL IN PASSAGE B FROM PARAGRAPH 5 TO PARAGRAPH 8.• Your summary, which must be in continuous writing (not note form), must not be longer than 150 words (not counting the words given to help you begin).• Begin your summary as follows: One effect “sure fail” examinations bring about is …• [25 m] Word Doc prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 27 February 2011
  • SUMMARY QUESTION • Passage B discusses the effects ofBACKGROUND INFORMATION “sure fail” examinations on students, parents and schools. Word Doc prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 28 February 2011
  • SUMMARY QUESTIONUsing your own words QUESTION REQUIREMENT:as far as possible, WHAT TO DOsummarise what the WHAT TO FOCUS ONauthor thinks are theeffects of setting “surefail” examinations andwhat should be doneto discourage suchpractice. Word Doc prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 29 February 2011
  • THE POINT ORGANISER(A) The effects of (B) what should besetting “sure fail” done to discourageexaminations such practice.A1 B1A2 B2A3 B3A4 B4 prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 30 February 2011
  • SUMMARY QUESTION WHERE IN THE TEXT SHOULD WE BE LOOKING FOR INFORMATIONUSE THE TO SUMMARISEMATERIAL INPASSAGE BFROMPARAGRAPH 5TO PARAGRAPH8. Word Doc prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 31 February 2011
  • SUMMARY QUESTIONYour summary,which must be incontinuous writing(not note form),must not be longerthan 150 words (notcounting the wordsgiven to help you STANDARD INSTRUCTIONSbegin). Word Doc prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 32 February 2011
  • WHAT DOES YOUR SUMMARY LOOK LIKE?It should be a SOLID one paragraph answerbeginning with the helping words given to letyou start off your writing.Do not discard any of your working as youdraw up your points you have gathered.If you run terribly out of time, submitwhatever you have done. REPEAT – do notdiscard any of your working. Submitwhatever you have. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 33 February 2011
  • SUMMARY QUESTION Begin yoursummary asfollows: Oneeffect “sure fail”examinationsbring about is …[25 m] THE BEGINNING WORDS WHICH YOU MUST USE Word Doc prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 34 February 2011
  • WHAT TO DO FIRST AND THEN NEXTA B CCONTENT LANGUAGE YOUR OWNPOINTS USED WORDS15/15 10/10 10/10ALWAYS GET DIVIDE BY 217 – 19 MAKE SURE YOUR USE YOUR VOCABULARY POWERPOINTS FIRST SENTENCES ARE TO HELP YOU REPLACE GRAMMATICALLY WORDS AND CORRECT EXPRESSIONS CORRECTLY prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 35 February 2011
  • REMEMBERCONTENT USE OF USE OF OWNPOINTS ENGLISH WORDS 15/15 10/10Make sure you Always write Leave this toalways try to relevantly. Do the last. Do notget 17 – 18 not add new waste time ifpoints. Do not information to you cannotjust get 15. your summary. come up with your own words. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 36 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 5 Thousands of students will be in tearsover unwonted failing grades. Thousands ofparents’ stress levels will rise, fearing theirchildren will do as badly in the PSLE or Olevels, as they did for their preliminaryexaminations. I am not familiar with theteaching pedagogy but it seems sheer badeducational practice to intentionally set anexamination paper which seeks to fail moststudents. That is not education; that ispsychological manipulation of a rathernegative and perverse nature. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 37 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 6 This practice of setting punitively difficult examinations inschools has been around for years. Schools justify it by saying thata little bit of failure spurs students to try harder. They may argue thepractice results in better grades. However, people who argue thisforget the impact of repeated failure on a child’s motivation andself-esteem. Top students who score 75 instead of their customary90 in a particularly difficult paper may indeed feel motivated to workharder to bridge the gap. However, what about the impact ofrepeated failure on the average child? A borderline studentwho fluctuates between a B and C, is likely to be pushed into asea of red ink when confronted with an exceptionally difficultexamination. Demoralised, goaded by fear, the child worksharder. Teachers raise the spectre of failure to coax the childto try harder. Tutors add on extra sessions. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 38 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 7 My question to those principals and teachers outthere blithely setting examination papers they know moststudents will fail in: Is the child, in such a state above,in a good frame of mind to take a high-stakesnational examinations? Some principals and teacherswho use this “fail-them” examination scare tactic willpoint out that it has worked for years, and raises theschool’s average scores in PSLE. My retort to that issimple: Your school’s aggregate average grades mayimprove but how many vulnerable children’s self-esteem have you destroyed in the process? Just aspertinently, how many children’s zest for learninghave you destroyed in the process? How manyindividual students ended up doing worse, notbetter, because of anxiety and stress? prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 39 February 2011
  • PARAGRAPH 8 The Ministry of Education should monitor anddiscourage this perverse practice. Guidelinesshould spell out the difficulty level of schoolpreparatory examinations, to align them with theactual standards of milestone examinations.Schools with large numbers of students whoconsistently fail mid-year and preliminaryexaminations, but who go on to do well at PSLE or Olevels, should not be praised for their students’“improved” results, but should instead bequestioned on why their internal schoolexaminations are so out of whack with the nationalones. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 40 February 2011
  • THE POINT ORGANISER(A) The effects of setting “sure (B) what should be done tofail” examinations discourage such practice. FOR EVERY POINT THAT FOR EVERY POINT THAT WE TRY TO GATHER FOR WE TRY TO GATHER FOR (A), WE HAVE TO REMIND OURSELVES: (B), WE HAVE TO REMIND OURSELVES: OK, SO WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF SETTING “SURE FAIL” EXAMINATIONS? WHAT ARE THE THINGS WHICH SHOULD BE DONE TO PREVENT SETTING SURE-FAIL EFFECTS CAN BE GOOD EFFECTS OR EXAMINATION PAPERS? BAD EFFECTS. AND YOU MUST HAVE A CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF THE MEANING OF WHAT ARE THE CHANGES THAT NEED TO BE “EFFECT”. MADE? IT MEANS “OUTCOME” or “RESULT”. SO, “EFFECTS” MEANS “OUTCOMES” OR “RESULTS”. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 41 February 2011
  • THE POINT ORGANISER(A) The effects of setting “sure (B) what should be done tofail” examinations discourage such practice.A1 Many students will be in tears over unwonted B1 Schools should ask themselves is the failing grades. fearful child, in a good frame of mind to take a high-stakes national examinations.A2 Many parents’ stress levels will rise, fearing B2 Schools should ask themselves how many their children will do as badly in the PSLE or O vulnerable children’s self-esteem have been levels, as they did for their preliminary destroyed. examinations. B3 Schools should ask themselves how many how many children’s zest for learning have you destroyed in the processA3 There may be positive impact of repeated B4 School should ask themselves how many failure on a bright child’s motivation and self- individual students might end up doing esteem. worse, not better, because of anxiety and stress.A4 But there is serious impact of repeated failure B5 The Education Ministry should monitor and on the average child – he may not be similarly discourage this perverse practice. motivated to do better.A5 A borderline student is likely to fail an B6 Guidelines should spell out the difficulty exceptionally difficult examination. level of school preparatory examinations, to align them with the actual standards of milestone examinations. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 42 February 2011
  • THE POINT ORGANISER(A) The effects of setting “sure (B) what should be done tofail” examinations discourage such practice.A6 Demoralised, goaded by fear, the child B7 Schools with large numbers of students works harder. who consistently fail mid-year and preliminary examinations, but who go on to do well at PSLE or O levels, should not be praised for their students’ “improved” results,A7 Teachers raise the spectre of failure to coax B8 but should instead be questioned on why the child to try harder. their internal school examinations are so out of whack with the national ones.A8 Tutors add on extra sessions. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 43 February 2011
  • From Points to Sentences and Summary ParagraphOne effect “sure fail” examinations bring about is (A1) Many students will be in tears over unwonted failing grades. (A2) Many parents’ stress levels will rise, fearing their children will do as badly in the PSLE or O levels, as they did for their preliminary examinations. (A3) There may be positive impact of repeated failure on a bright child’s motivation and self- esteem. (A4) But there is serious impact of repeated failure on the average child – he may not be similarly motivated to do better. (A5) A borderline student is likely to fail an exceptionally difficult examination. (A6) Demoralised, goaded by fear, the child works harder. (A7) Teachers raise the spectre of failure to coax the child to try harder. (A8) Tutors add on extra sessions. (B1) Schools should ask themselves is the fearful child, in a good frame of mind to take a high-stakes national examinations. (B2) Schools should ask themselves how many vulnerable children’s self-esteem have been destroyed. (B3) Schools should ask themselves how many how many children’s zest for learning have you destroyed in the process. (B4) School should ask themselves how many individual students might end up doing worse, not better, because of anxiety and stress. (B5) The Education Ministry should monitor and discourage this perverse practice. (B6) Guidelines should spell out the difficulty level of school preparatory examinations, to align them with the actual standards of milestone examinations. (B7) Schools with large numbers of students who consistently fail mid-year and preliminary examinations, but who go on to do well at PSLE or O levels, should not be praised for their students’ “improved” results. (B8) but should instead be questioned on why their internal school examinations are so out of whack with the national ones.(ABOUT 264 WORDS) prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 44 February 2011
  • DO YOU REMEMBER AHMAD THE CHEF?(A1) Many students will be in tears over unwonted failing grades.(A2) Many parents’ stress levels will rise, fearing their children will do as badly in the PSLE or O levels, asthey did for their preliminary examinations.(A3) There may be positive impact of repeated failure on a bright child’s motivation and self-esteem.(A4) But there is serious impact of repeated failure on the average child – he may not be similarly motivatedto do better.(A5) A borderline student is likely to fail an exceptionally difficult examination.(A6) Demoralised, goaded by fear, the child works harder.(A7) Teachers raise the spectre of failure to coax the child to try harder.(A8) Tutors add on extra sessions.(B1) Schools should ask themselves is the fearful child, in a good frame of mind to take a high-stakesnational examinations.(B2) Schools should ask themselves how many vulnerable children’s self-esteem have been destroyed.(B3) Schools should ask themselves how many how many children’s zest for learning have you destroyedin the process.(B4) School should ask themselves how many individual students might end up doing worse, not better,because of anxiety and stress.(B5) The Education Ministry should monitor and discourage this perverse practice.(B6) Guidelines should spell out the difficulty level of school preparatory examinations, to align them withthe actual standards of milestone examinations.(B7) Schools with large numbers of students who consistently fail mid-year and preliminary examinations,but who go on to do well at PSLE or O levels, should not be praised for their students’ “improved” results.(B8) but should instead be questioned on why their internal school examinations are so out of whack withthe national ones. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 45 February 2011
  • WHAT DID YOU DO WITH AHMAD THE CHEF YOU CAN APPLY THE SAME THINGS NOW.1. MAKE USE OF INFORMATION FROM YOUR POINTS ONLY.2. DO NOT INTRODUCE NEW CONTENT.3. REMOVE ANY REPETITION OF STRUCTURES / IDEAS.4. USE FUNCTION WORDS or PHRASES.5. CHECK GRAMMAR.6. CHECK NUMBER OF WORDS. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 46 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words• One effect “sure fail” examinations bring about is• (A1) Many students will be in tears over unwonted failing grades.• (A2) Many parents’ stress levels will rise, fearing their children will do as badly in the PSLE or O levels, as they did for their preliminary examinations. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 47 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words• (A1) Many • (A1) Many • Many students students will be in students will be will be tears over traumatised over traumatised over unwonted failing unexpected unexpected grades. failures. failures and their parents’ stress• (A2) Many levels will rise, • (A2) Many fearing they will parents’ stress parents’ stress do as badly in the levels will rise, levels will rise, national fearing their fearing their examinations as children will do as children will do as they did at badly in the PSLE badly in the school. or O levels, as national they did for their examinations as preliminary they did for their examinations. preliminary examinations. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 48 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words.• (A3) There may be positive impact of repeated failure on a bright child’s motivation and self-esteem.• (A4) But there is serious impact of repeated failure on the average child – he may not be similarly motivated to do better.• (A5) A borderline student is likely to fail an exceptionally difficult examination. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 49 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words.• (A3) There may be positive • Repeated failure may impact of repeated failure affect a bright child’s on a bright child’s motivation and self- motivation and self- esteem. esteem positively but• (A4) But there is serious the average child may impact of repeated failure not be similarly on the average child – he motivated to do better. may not be similarly motivated to do better. A borderline student is• (A5) A borderline student likely to fail an is likely to fail an exceptionally difficult exceptionally difficult examination. examination. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 50 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words• (A6) Demoralised, goaded by fear, the child works harder.• (A7) Teachers raise the spectre of failure to coax the child to try harder.• (A8) Tutors add on extra sessions. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 51 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words• (A6) Demoralised, goaded by fear, the Teachers frighten child works harder. the child into• (A7) Teachers raise studying harder to the spectre of avoid failure and failure to coax the tutors add on extra child to try harder. sessions. Driven by• (A8) Tutors add on fear, the diffident extra sessions. child complies. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 52 February 2011
  • Let’s stop for a while to collate our points for [A]Many students will be traumatised over unexpectedfailures and their parents’ stress levels will rise,fearing they will do as badly in the nationalexaminations as they did at school. Repeated failuremay affect a bright child’s motivation and self-esteem positively but the average child may not besimilarly motivated to do better. A borderline studentis likely to fail an exceptionally difficult examination.Teachers frighten the child into studying harder toavoid failure and tutors add on extra sessions.Driven by fear, the diffident child complies.[87 words] prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 53 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words• (B1) Schools should ask themselves is the fearful child, in a good frame of mind to take a high-stakes national examinations.• (B2) Schools should ask themselves how many vulnerable children’s self-esteem have been destroyed.• (B3) Schools should ask themselves how many how many children’s zest for learning have you destroyed in the process. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 54 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words• (B1) Schools should ask Schools must themselves is the fearful child, in a good frame of reflect if a fearful mind to take a high-stakes child can deliver at national examinations. important national• (B2) Schools should ask themselves how many examinations. vulnerable children’s self- They must learn to esteem have been protect many destroyed.• (B3) Schools should ask vulnerable themselves how many how children’s self- many children’s zest for esteem and learning have you destroyed in the process. zest for learning. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 55 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words• (B4) Schools should ask themselves how many individual students might end up doing worse, not better, because of anxiety and stress.• (B5) The Education Ministry should monitor and discourage this perverse practice. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 56 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words• (B4) Schools should • Schools must ask themselves how understand how many individual many individual students might end students might end up doing worse, not up doing worse, not better, because of better, because of anxiety and stress. anxiety and stress.• (B5) The Education • The Education Ministry should Ministry should monitor and monitor and discourage this discourage this perverse practice. undesirable practice. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 57 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words• (B6) Guidelines should spell out the difficulty level of school preparatory examinations, to align them with the actual standards of milestone examinations.• (B7) Schools with large numbers of students who consistently fail mid-year and preliminary examinations, but who go on to do well at PSLE or O levels, should not be praised for their students’ “improved” results.• (B8) but should instead be questioned on why their internal school examinations are so out of whack with the national ones. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 58 February 2011
  • How to reduce 264 words to 150 words• (B6) Guidelines should spell • There must be guidelines that out the difficulty level of spell out the difficulty level of school preparatory school examinations, to align examinations, to align them them with the actual standards with the actual standards of of national examinations. milestone examinations. • Schools with large numbers of• (B7) Schools with large underperforming students numbers of students who who excel in national consistently fail mid-year and examinations should not be preliminary examinations, but congratulated for their who go on to do well at PSLE students’ “improved” results, or O levels, should not be • but should instead be praised for their students’ questioned on why their “improved” results. internal school examinations• (B8) but should instead be are dissimilar to the national questioned on why their ones. internal school examinations are so out of whack with the national ones. prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 59 February 2011
  • Let’s collate the sentences for Part B.Schools must reflect if a fearful child can deliver atimportant national examinations. They must learn toprotect many vulnerable children’s self-esteem and zestfor learning. Schools must understand how manyindividual students might end up doing worse, not better,because of anxiety and stress. The Education Ministryshould monitor and discourage this undesirable practice.There must be guidelines that spell out the difficultylevel of school examinations, to align them with theactual standards of national examinations. Schools withlarge numbers of underperforming students who excel innational examinations should not be congratulated fortheir students’ “improved” results, but should instead bequestioned on why their internal school examinations aredissimilar to the national ones. (116 words) prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 60 February 2011
  • Draft 2One effect “sure fail” examinations bring about is many students will betraumatised over unexpected failures and their parents’ stress levels will rise,fearing they will do as badly in the national examinations as they did at school.Repeated failure may affect a bright child’s motivation and self-esteempositively but the average child may not be similarly motivated to do better. Aborderline student is likely to fail an exceptionally difficult examination.Teachers frighten the child into studying harder to avoid failure and tutors addon extra sessions. Driven by fear, the diffident child complies. Schools mustreflect if a fearful child can deliver at important national examinations. Theymust learn to protect many vulnerable children’s self-esteem and zest forlearning. Schools must understand how many individual students might endup doing worse, not better, because of anxiety and stress. The EducationMinistry should monitor and discourage this undesirable practice. There mustbe guidelines that spell out the difficulty level of school examinations, to alignthem with the actual standards of national examinations. Schools with largenumbers of underperforming students who excel in national examinationsshould not be congratulated for their students’ “improved” results, but shouldinstead be questioned on why their internal school examinations are dissimilarto the national ones. [203 words] prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 61 February 2011
  • Draft 3One effect “sure fail” examinations bring about is many students willbe traumatised over unexpected failures and their parents will beunduly stressed, worrying about their performance in nationalexaminations. Repeated failure may motivate a bright child positivelybut the average child may not be similarly encouraged. A borderlinestudent may fail a particularly difficult examination. Teachers frightenthe diffident child into studying harder to avoid failure and tutors addon extra sessions. Schools must reflect if a fearful child can deliver atimportant national examinations. They must learn to protect manyvulnerable children’s self-esteem and zest for learning. They mustunderstand how students underperform due to anxiety and stress. TheEducation Ministry should monitor schools. There must beguidelines on setting school examinations, to align them with theactual standards of national examinations. Schools with largenumbers of underperforming students who excel in nationalexaminations should not be congratulated for their students’“improved” results, but should instead be questioned on why theirinternal school examinations are dissimilar to the national ones.[164 words] prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 62 February 2011
  • DRAFT 4 One effect “sure fail” examinations bring about is many students willbe traumatised over unexpected failures and their parents will bestressed, worrying about their performance in national examinations.Repeated failure may motivate a bright child positively but the averagechild may not be similarly encouraged. A borderline student may fail aparticularly difficult examination. Teachers frighten the diffident childinto studying harder to avoid failure while tutors supply extrasessions. Schools must reflect if a fearful child can deliver atimportant national examinations. They must protect children’s self-esteem and zest for learning. They must stop students from under-performing due to anxiety and stress. The Education Ministry shouldmonitor schools. Guidelines are needed to align schoolexaminations with national examinations. Schools with large numbersof under-performing students who excel in national examinationsshould not be congratulated for their students’ “improved” results,but should instead be questioned on why their internal schoolexaminations are dissimilar to the national ones. [150 words] prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee 13 63 February 2011