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Marker’s report 1127 english secondary three paper 2 by yeo yamhwee

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SHSS Mid Year Examinaitons 1127 Paper 2 …

SHSS Mid Year Examinaitons 1127 Paper 2
Secondary Three NA / Express

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  • 1. Marker’Marker’s Report English Language 1127 Paper 2 Secondary Two Mid Year Examinations 2011 Set, marked and reported by Yeo Yam HweeAlso available at www.nekosan-nekosan.blogspot.com
  • 2. The General Guidelines for Marking and Awarding of Marks• Read Passages A and B in the insert provided carefully before you attempt any questions. Answer all questions. You are recommended to answer them in the order set. Mistakes in spelling, punctuation and grammar may be penalized in any part of the paper.• GENERAL UNDERSTANDING FOR MARKING THE SCRIPTS:• Please do not deduct any marks for grammar / misspelling or punctuation sips when marking Questions 1 to 14.• Award marks for comprehension. When in doubt, ask ourselves – Did the answer deliver an understanding of the question asked?• Determine if the candidate has understood the question and provided a reasonable answer before awarding the marks.• Do not award ½ mark under any circumstances when scoring any 1 mark question.• For an incomplete answer to a 1-mark question, award no marks.• Guidelines to O level marking of Paper 2 applies.
  • 3. Insert - Passage A Paragraph 1All of those broken bones in northernJapan, all of those broken lives and thosebroken homes prompt us to rememberwhat in calmer times we invariably forget:the most stern and chilling of mantrasholds, quite simply, that mankind inhabitsthis earth subject to geological consent,which can be withdrawn at any time.
  • 4. Insert - Passage A Paragraph 1 Northeast Region Japan Quake 2011
  • 5. Insert - Passage A Paragraph 1
  • 6. Insert - Passage A Paragraph 2For the Japanese, this consent was withdrawn with shocking suddenness at2:46 p.m. on 11 March 2011. One moment, all were going about theirday-to-day business and then the ground began to shake. At first, theshock was merely a much stronger and rather longer version of the tremorsto which most Japanese are well accustomed. There came a stunnedsilence as there always does. However, minutes later, a low rumble fromthe east, the coastal waters off the northern Honshu vanished, suckedmysteriously out to sea. The rumbling continued. People began to spy aragged white line on the horizon, and, with unimaginable ferocity, the linebecame clear as a wall of waves swept back inshore at great height.Seconds later, these Pacific Ocean waters hit the Japanese seawalls,surmounted them with careless ease and began to claw across the landbeyond, in what would become a dispassionate and detached orgy of utterdestruction. The sturdy buildings that survived the quake were ravaged bythe waves. The three-storey wall of water dissolved coastal towns, dry-docked boats on the roofs of buildings and shuffled houses like playingcards. There were so many aftershocks that people stopped diving undertables. Those who made it safely to higher ground waited in the dark, in thecold, in lines that stretched for hours for water and food.
  • 7. PA P2 Q1 – 1 mark Quote a sentence which tells you that the normal lives of the Japanese were being disrupted by the forces of nature on 11 March 2011. ANSWER: The normal lives of the Japanese One moment, all were going about their day-to-day business and then the ground began to shake.The disruption from the forces of nature That day – 11 March 2011 HOW TO MARK: • Incomplete answer / Incomplete sentence / Any other sentence = 0 • Any part of the sentence being left out, intentionally or otherwise = 0 • Answer must clearly show candidate’s understanding of what a sentence is.
  • 8. PA-P2-Q1: Students’ input included:All were going about their day-to-day business and then the ground began toshake.For the Japanese, this consent was withdrawn with shocking suddenness at2:46 p.m. on 11 March 2011.At first, the shock was merely a much stronger and rather longer version of thetremors to which most Japanese are well accustomed.There came a stunned silence as there always does.All these are unacceptable.
  • 9. PA-P2-Q1: Advice to studentsQuote a sentence which tells you thatthe normal lives of the Japanese were Understand the conceptsbeing disrupted by the forces of nature ofon 11 March 2011. Sentence Verb Clause Adjective Expression Adverb Phrase Noun Always look for the given One moment, all were sentence which contains going about their day- the closest meaning to-day business and to what is being then the ground began paraphrased or explained to shake. to you by the setter.
  • 10. PA P2 Q2 (2 marks) What does the expression, “unimaginable ferocity” (line 13) suggest about the nature of the waves?ANSWER: The waves were extremely powerful and/or violent (= ferocity) [1] , quite beyond what anybody could ever think of (= unimaginable) [1].
  • 11. PA P2 Q2 (2 marks)HOW TO MARK:• Accept any other answers which MUST adequately explain the expression.• Award full marks so long as BOTH words in the expression are being adequately explained.• Award 1 mark if the given answer is correct but only provides a partial explanation of the given expression.
  • 12. PA P2 Q2 (2 marks)HOW TO MARK:• Do not award any marks if there is any contradiction in the answer.• Do not award any marks if these words “ferocity”, “ferociousness”, “ferocious”, “imagination”, “imagined”, “imagine” or “image” are found in any part of the student’s answer.
  • 13. PA P2 Q2: Advice for StudentsWhat does the expression, “unimaginable ferocity”(line 13) suggest about the nature of the waves?You may not see the phrase, “USE YOUR OWNWORDS” or “USE YOUR OWN WORDS AS FAR ASPOSSIBLE”, you will have to understand that thisquestion challenges you to explain the use of thetwo words (actually a phrase). You cannot use thesame two words in any other forms when explainingby penning down your answer. This question dealswith both VOCABULARY and LANGUAGE USE.
  • 14. PA P2 Q2: Advice for StudentsWhat does the expression, “unimaginable ferocity” (line 13) suggest aboutthe nature of the waves?ASK YOURSELVES IF THIS IS A VALID ANSWER?This expression tells me that the nature of the waves is so ferocious that its force is beyond what the Japanese can imagine.*Language use – In a conversation, there is an opportunity for the partiesinvolved to seek further clarification with regard to the above utteredresponse. However, when penning down your answer in a formalexamination in the use of English Language, the above answer has barelyattempted to explain anything.
  • 15. PA P2 Q2: Advice for Students What does the expression, “unimaginable ferocity” (line 13) suggest about the nature of the waves? Avoid all these directly related words:NOUN VERB ADVERB ADJECTIVEImagination To imagine Imaginably Be imaginable*Unimagination To *unimagine Unimaginably Be unimaginableImaginativeness Imaginatively Be imaginative Unimaginatively Be unimaginativeFerociousness Ferociously Be ferociousFerocity
  • 16. Why is knowledge of word class a prerequisite?What does the expression, “unimaginableferocity” (line 13) suggest about the nature ofthe waves? NOUN: What is soUnimaginable ferocity “Unimaginable”? ADJECTIVE: “Unimaginable” describes the word “ferocity”. What kind of “ferocity”?
  • 17. PA P2 Q2: Advice for StudentsDo not tear apart the phrase to attempt an explanation. You willmore likely than not, produce a misinterpretation such as the one Iam showing here:“Unimaginable ferocity” suggests that the waves were unexpectedand they were powerful. (from an actual candidate’s script)versus“Unimaginable ferocity” suggests that the waves were unexpectedlypowerful.
  • 18. PA P2 Q3 ( 1 mark)• “…a wall of waves swept back inshore at great height” (lines 13 – 14). How high was it being reported to be?• ANSWER:• It was three-storey high.• HOW TO MARK:• Award no marks to any other answers given.
  • 19. How to look for the answer to PA P2 Q3?For the Japanese, this consent was withdrawn with shockingsuddenness at 2:46 p.m. on 11 March 2011. One moment, all weregoing about their day-to-day business and then the ground began toshake. At first, the shock was merely a much stronger and ratherlonger version of the tremors to which most Japanese are wellaccustomed. There came a stunned silence as there always does.However, minutes later, a low rumble from the east, the coastal watersoff the northern Honshu vanished, sucked mysteriously out to sea. Therumbling continued. People began to spy a ragged white line on thehorizon, and, with unimaginable ferocity, the line became clear as awall of waves swept back inshore at great height. Seconds later, thesePacific Ocean waters hit the Japanese seawalls, surmounted them withcareless ease and began to claw across the land beyond, in whatwould become a dispassionate and detached orgy of utter destruction.The sturdy buildings that survived the quake were ravaged by thewaves. The three-storey wall of water dissolved coastaltowns, dry-docked boats on the roofs of buildings andshuffled houses like playing cards. There were so manyaftershocks that people stopped diving under tables. Those who madeit safely to higher ground waited in the dark, in the cold, in lines thatstretched for hours for water and food.
  • 20. • “…a wall of waves For the Japanese, this consent was withdrawn with shocking suddenness at 2:46 p.m. on 11 swept back March 2011. One moment, all were going about inshore at great their day-to-day business and then the ground began to shake. At first, the shock was merely a height” (lines 13 – much stronger and rather longer version of the tremors to which most Japanese are well 14). How high accustomed. There came a stunned silence as there always does. However, minutes later, a low was it being rumble from the east, the coastal waters off the reported to be? northern Honshu vanished, sucked mysteriously out to sea. The rumbling continued. People began to spy a ragged white line on the horizon, and, with unimaginable ferocity, theLook out for the sentence in which line became clear as a wall of waves sweptthe quoted words (in brackets) from the back inshore at great height. Seconds later,question come from. The answer is these Pacific Ocean waters hit the Japaneseusually nearer to you than you think. seawalls, surmounted them with careless easeSo always be patient by going through and began to claw across the land beyond, ineach and every sentence. what would become a dispassionate and detached orgy of utter destruction. The sturdy buildings that survived the quake were ravaged by the waves. The three-storey wall of water dissolved coastal towns, dry-docked boats on Look for any the roofs of buildings and shuffled houses like playing cards. There were so many aftershocks sentence which that people stopped diving under tables. Those who made it safely to higher ground waited in the sheds the light on the dark, in the cold, in lines that stretched for hours for water and food. issue of HEIGHT.
  • 21. PA P2 Q4 (2 marks)• Explain fully why people stopped diving under tables (lines 20 – 21).• ANSWER:• There were so many aftershocks which made it useless / futile / dangerous for people to hide under the tables anymore.
  • 22. PA P2 Q4 (2 marks)HOW TO MARK:• Award 2 marks if these two parts are found in the answer:• There were so/too many aftershocks.• It was useless / futile / dangerous for them to hide under tables anymore.
  • 23. PA P2 Q4 (2 marks)• Award 1 mark if only this is found in the answer:• There were so/too many aftershocks.BUT• Do not award any marks if only this is found in the answer:• It was useless / futile / dangerous for them to hide under tables.
  • 24. PA P2 Q4 (2 marks)Read the following sentence carefullyand then you will see that the answer isfound within it.There were so many aftershocks thatpeople stopped diving under tables. There were so many aftershocks. Somuch so that people stopped diving undertables. It probably would not do them anygood at all.
  • 25. PA P2 Q5 (1 mark)• The survivors “waited in lines that stretched for hours for food and water” (line 22). What does this suggest about the progress of outside help to them?• ANSWER:• Outside help took a long time to reach the survivors. (acceptable: a very long time)• Outside help was slow to reach the survivors. (acceptable: very slow)• Outside help had difficulties reaching the survivors.• Outside help was not efficient enough to reach the survivors.
  • 26. PA P2 Q5 (1 mark)• HOW TO MARK:• Award 1 mark to any other suitable answer which adequately addresses “the progress of outside help”.• Do not accept:• There was little progress. ( This answer conveniently labels “progress” which is not what the question is asking the candidate to do. The phrase “little progress” also begs the question: how so? )• It is the “pace” which is “ongoing” that has to be addressed.
  • 27. PA P2 Q5 (1 mark)• If the candidate’s answer leans towards “outcome” or “extent” or prescribes by handing down a “judgement”, he is not dealing with any suggestion of “progress”.
  • 28. PA P2 Q5 (1 mark)• Do not accept:• Outside help was insufficient or Outside help was insufficient enough.• Outside help was ineffective or Outside help was ineffective enough.
  • 29. Insert - Passage A Paragraph 3Japan is at the junction of a web of tectonic plate boundaries thatmakes it more peculiarly vulnerable to seismic activities than almostanywhere else. Besides geography, topography also played anespecially tragic role too – for it is an axiom known to all those whodwell by high-tsunami-risk coastlines that when the sea sucks back,you run inland and, if at all possible, you run uphill. However, in thiscorner of northeast Japan, with its wide plains of rice meadows andideal factory sites and conveniently flat airport locations, there maywell be a great deal of inland – but there is almost no uphill. So thereality is this: if a monstrous wave is chasing you inland at thespeed of a jetliner, and if the flat terrain denies you any chance ofsprinting to a hilltop to try to escape its wrath, then you cannot avoidthe inevitable: it will catch you, it will drown you, and its forces willpulverise you out of all recognition, as a thing of utter insignificance.
  • 30. PA P3 Q6 (1 mark)• What is the wisest thing to do for those living along high-tsunami-risk coastlines during a tsunami attack?• The wisest thing in this sentence refers to “the axiom” (Passage A Line 26) which is a complete understanding or knowledge held by the people living under similar conditions. It does not break up into discrete courses of action. It refers to the full course of action.• ANSWER:• The people should run inland and then run uphill.
  • 31. PA P3 Q6 (1 mark)• HOW TO MARK:• Do not accept any PART or INCOMPLETE answer.• Do not accept any answer which changes the meaning of the original advice given in the passage. This is a wrong answer:• The people should run inland OR run uphill. (The original text does not provide any choice in this sense at all.)
  • 32. PA P3 Q7 (2 marks)• Explain fully in your own words why it is hopeless to try to escape from a tsunami if you are on flat land.• RELEVANT AREA OF TEXT from which answer is taken from:• …and if flat terrain denies you any chance of sprinting to a hilltop to try to escape its wrath, then you cannot avoid the inevitable: it will catch you, it will drown you, and its forces will pulverise you out of all recognition… (lines 31- 34)
  • 33. PA P3 Q7 (2 marks)• ANSWER (Own Words):• There is no highland or high level area for a person to run to higher grounds. [1] When the powerful waves engulf a person, it will certainly overwhelm /smother him and crush him completely, killing him. [1]
  • 34. PA P3 Q7 (2 marks)• HOW TO MARK:• Award 2 marks if the answer “explains fully” and “given in own words”.• Award I mark to any part of the answer which “explains fully” and “given in own words”.• Do not award any marks for answers not “given in own words”.
  • 35. Insert - Passage A Paragraph 4Unknown numbers of bodies lie amid the ashes. Yet however muchpeople are in turmoil, few mope. Rationing of everything from petrolto water has generally been accepted with nary a complaint orraised voice; the idea is that everybody has to share the painequally. Emergency centres, where more than 450,000 evacueesare being housed in stadiums or schools, are neatly organized, withpeople constructing origami boxes made of newspaper in which tonestle their shoes. This is a country where people do not wearshoes inside their homes, and the habit extends to the little islandsof blankets that each evacuated family claims in their emergencyshelter. Even though basic supplies are running low, lines at gasstations and grocery stores are orderly. There have been no reportsof looting. In a society seen as the most stoic on earth, the closestthing to chaos was a man cutting in line.
  • 36. PA P4 Q8 (2 marks)• Write down, using your own words as far as possible, any two pieces of evidence showing through the actions of the survivors that they desire to return to a semblance of day-to-day orderliness in the aftermath of the natural disaster.
  • 37. PA P4 Q8 (2 marks)• ANSWER:• People build origami boxes from newspaper to put their shoes in. [1]• Lines at gas stations and grocery stores are orderly. [1]• HOW TO MARK:• Do not award any marks to any other answers.
  • 38. Insert - Passage B Paragraph 1
  • 39. Japanese quake survivors queuing to get grocery items outside a shop
  • 40. Cars queuing to reach petrol station
  • 41. Insert - Passage B Paragraph 1 How can I describe those several weeksbeneath the ice-ridge? Nothing really importanthappened and yet all sorts of troubles short oftotal disaster seemed to have occurred. Ibelieved we were still prepared to endure cold,exhaustion and danger and to strain ourendurance to the limit, our prize being thehighest peak in the Garhwal Himalayas andprobably the fourth highest mountain in theworld, also known as K3.
  • 42. PB P1 Q9 (2 marks)“…and yet all sorts of troublesshort of total disaster seemed tohave occurred” (lines 2 -3).Explain the comment made bythe narrator with regard to theprogress of the expedition.
  • 43. PB P1 Q9 (2 marks) ANSWER:• It was an expedition fraught with a lot of problems [1] but none threatening enough to put an end to it. [1]
  • 44. PB P1 Q9 (2 marks)• HOW TO MARK:• Award 2 marks for a complete answer.• Award 1 mark if the student provides only the first part of the answer.• Do not award any marks if the student provides only the second part of the answer.• Do not award any marks if both parts of the answer contradict each other.
  • 45. Broad Peak which isoriginally known as K3.
  • 46. What a base camp looks like.
  • 47. Insert - Passage B Paragraph 2Our motley crew of climbers established our base campas close to the mountain as we could, less than half amile from the tongue of its lower glacier, and madepreparations for the ascent. Our food and equipmentwere unpacked, inspected, sorted, and then repacked inlighter loads for transportation to more advanced camps.We spent hours studying maps and charts, and morehours studying the mountain through the telescope andfield glasses. We surveyed the glacier thoroughly andplanned a route across it. Then came the backbreakinglabour of moving up supplies and establishing a chain ofcamps.
  • 48. PB P2 Q10 (2 marks)• Why was it crucial for “food and equipment to be repacked in lighter loads” (line 10)?• ANSWER:• It is so because the crew had to share out the loads to make the ascent [1] by establishing a chain of camps [1] in order to climb up the mountain.
  • 49. PB P2 Q10 (2 marks)• HOW TO MARK:• Accept any other answer which reasonably explains the need for the crew to carry the food and equipment up the mountain for setting up camps so that they could continue their climb.• Award 1 mark to any incomplete but correct answer.
  • 50. Insert - Passage B Paragraph 3 Camps 1 and 2 were set up on the glacier itselfwhile Camp 3 was built at its upper end, as nearas possible to the point where the great rockybackbone of K3 came out of the ice and startedits sharp ascent. Camps established higher upwould simply serve as shelters for a night or two.Hour after hour and day after day, the long file ofmen wound up and down the uneven glacier.We just left supplies of food and equipmentthere in Camps 1 and 2. We needed all themanpower available to work on the highercamps on the mountain.
  • 51. PB P3 Q11 (1 mark)• Why would the camps built higher up probably not be elaborately furnished?• ANSWER:• They were simply being used as shelters for a night or two.
  • 52. PB P3 Q11 (1 mark)• HOW TO MARK:• Do not award any marks if the answer does not include “for a night or two” or suggest “a short / temporary stay”.• Do not accept any other answers.
  • 53. Insert – Passage B Paragraph 4 With our axes we cut countless thousands of steps in the gleaming walls of ice. We clung to handholds on the cliff face and strained at ropes until we thought our arms would come off. Storms swept down on us, battered us and passed. The wind increased, and the air grew steadily colder and more difficult to breathe. One morning two of the porters woke up with their feet frozen black; they had to be sent down to base camp. A short while later, one more developed an uncontrollable nosebleed and had to go down. However, the enemy we feared most did not return to attack us. No further tremors were felt.
  • 54. PB P4 Q12 (1 mark)• What was “the enemy we feared most” (line 29)?• ANSWER:• The enemy was “the tremors”.• HOW TO MARK:• Do not accept any other answers.
  • 55. Insert – Passage B Paragraph 5We were climbing from Camp 4 to 5, and analmost perpendicular ice wall had made itnecessary for us to come out for a few yards onthe exposed crest of the ridge. There were sixof us in the party, roped together with the leaderin front, myself second, and four porters in therear. The ridge right here was free of snow, butknife-thin, and the rocks were covered with asmooth coat of ice. On either side the mountaindropped away 5000 feet straight down.
  • 56. Insert – Passage B Paragraph 6 Suddenly the quivers struck causing the last porter to slip. I heard the scrapping of boot nails behind me and turned to see him plunge sideways into space. There was a scream as the next porter was jerked off too. I remember trying desperately to dig into the ridge with my axe, realising as I did it that it would no more hold the weight of the falling men than would a pin stuck in the wall. Our leader shouted, “Jump!” As he said it, the rope went tight around my waist and I went flying after him into space on the opposite side of the ridge from the fallen porters. After me came the porter next behind me. By then the tremors had stopped but we feared an avalanche might have been triggered.
  • 57. Insert – Passage B Paragraph 7 I heard myself cry out, and saw the glacier below coming up at me. Then the rope jerked tight at my waist. I hung for a moment, then I swung in slowly to the side of the mountain. Above me the rope lay tight and motionless across the crest of the ridge. Our weight exactly balanced that of the men who had fallen on the far side. The leader’s voice came up from below. “You men on the other side!’ he shouted. “Start climbing slowly. We’re climbing, too.” In five minutes we had all regained the ridge. The porters and I sat gasping on the jagged rocks, our eyes closed, the sweat freezing on our faces. The leader carefully examined the rope that again hung loosely between us. “All right, men,” he said presently, “let’s get to the camp for a cup of tea.”
  • 58. PB P7 Q13 (2 marks)• Explain fully how the leader and the narrator’s quick jump off the ridge had helped save the lives of the porters who had fallen off the other side of the ridge.• ANSWER:• When the leader and the narrator fell off their side of the ridge, they acted as a counterweight to the fallen porters on the other side. [1] Then both parties slowly climbed back up the ridge together to safety. [1]
  • 59. PB P7 Q13 (2 marks)• HOW TO MARK:• Award 2 marks to any other answers which fully (and similarly) address the question.• Award 1 mark for each incomplete but correct answer.
  • 60. From Passage A and Passage B: Q14(1) - 1 mark• withdrawn (line 4)• The geological consent can be withdrawn at any time.• Recalled Terminated• Removed Revoked• Retracted Withheld• Taken back Discontinued• Taken away• Recanted made invalid• Rescinded Invalidated
  • 61. From PA and PB Q14(2) – 1 mark• conveniently (line 29)• …conveniently flat airport locations…• Easily available• Easily accessible• Easily deployable• Readily available• Readily accessible• Readily deployable
  • 62. From PA and PB Q14(3) – 1 mark• utter (line 34)• …as a thing of utter insignificance…• Total• Absolute• Complete• Pure• Sheer
  • 63. From PA and PB Q14(4) – 1 mark• clung (line 23)• We clung to handholds on the cliff face.• Held (on) tightly• Held tightly• Grip• Grasp• Grab tightly
  • 64. From PA and PB Q14(5) – 1 mark• perpendicular (line 30)• …an almost perpendicular ice wall had made it necessary for us to come out for a few yards …• Exactly vertical• Vertical• Upright
  • 65. PB Q15 (25 marks)• You were a newspaper journalist who was covering the story of the K3 expedition crew. Using your own words as far as possible, summarise the preparations, challenges and dangers faced by the crew in their attempt to climb the mountain.• USE ONLY THE MATERIAL IN PASSAGE B FROM PARAGRAPHS 2 TO 7.• Your summary, which must be in continuous writing (not note form), must not be longer than 150 words (not counting the words given to help you begin).• Begin your summary as follows: The crew members of the K3 expedition team…
  • 66. POINTS (A.B.C)A B CPreparations Challenges Dangersmade overcome faced
  • 67. A. Preparations1 Established base camps as close to the mountain as possible.2 Unpacked, inspected and sorted supplies3 Repacked into lighter loads for transportation to advanced camps7 Planned route across glacier9 Establishing camps higher up
  • 68. B. Challenges4 Spent long hours studying maps and charts5 Spent longer hours studying the mountain through telescope and field glasses6 Surveyed glacier thoroughly8 Backbreaking labour of moving supplies up mountain10 Moving up and down uneven glacier
  • 69. B. Challenges Shortage of manpower as more camps were11 built Using axes to cut innumerable steps in the12 icewalls Clinging to handholds on the cliff face13 Straining at ropes as far as they could14 tolerate Sending sick and injured men down to base17 camp Climbing an almost perpendicular ice wall19 with a knife-thin ridge
  • 70. C. Dangers15 Battling storms and winds16 Dealing with difficulties in breathing / high-altitude related sickness18 Dealing with the threat of tremors20 Forced the crew to tread on the exposed crest of the ridge
  • 71. C. Dangers21 The rocks were coated with smooth ice22 On either side the mountain dropped away 5000 feet straight down23 A porter slipped when the quivers struck24 Plunged sideways into space
  • 72. C. Dangers25 Another screaming porter fell away on the same side26 Man next to leader tried to dig into the ridge with his axe in vain to attempt to hold the weight of the falling men27 The leader shouted for people on his side to jump when he jumped28 Followed by two other men who fell off the other side
  • 73. C. Dangers29 An avalanche had been triggered30 The men hung for a moment31 Then swung in slowly to the side of the mountain32 The weight on both side of the ridge exactly balanced each other33 With the rope at their waist, men on both sides climbed slowly back up the ridge at leader’s command.

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