Does the media have a negative influence on young women?

2,021
-1

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,021
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
43
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Does the media have a negative influence on young women?

  1. 1. Do the Images Displayed byMedia Have a NegativeEffect on Young Women?
  2. 2. Think aboutthis…
  3. 3. Have you ever seenimages like these?
  4. 4. How did you feel after seeing the image?
  5. 5. How did you feel after seeing that image?Did you feel insecure ordissatisfied with your ownbody?
  6. 6. How did you feel after seeing that image?Did you feel insecure ordissatisfied with your ownbody?It is likely that you have feltthose dissatisfied feelings, butyou are not alone.
  7. 7. Many images displayed by the mediahave negative effects on mostpeople, especially young women. me
  8. 8. You might be wondering,“Why do these negativeeffects matter?”
  9. 9. Currently, there are 10million women in theU.S. suffering form aneating disorder.
  10. 10. “Eating Disorders are characterized bysevere disturbances in eating behavior….A disturbance in perception of body shapeand weight is an essential feature of bothAnorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.”
  11. 11. Eating DisordersMany women suffering from eating disorders viewthemselves like the women in these pictures.
  12. 12. There is strong evidence that the media’snegative influence plays a role in thedevelopment of eating disorders.
  13. 13. How does the mediainfluence young women?#1: The media displaysunhealthy and unrealisticimages.
  14. 14. UNHEALTHY:
  15. 15. UNHEALTHY: UNREALISTIC:
  16. 16. A survey of young women found theybelieved that “ideal teenage girl is describedas 5’7”, 100 pounds, and size 5 with longblond hair and blue eyes”
  17. 17. A survey of young women found they believed that “idealteenage girl is described as 5’7”, 100 pounds, and size 5with long blond hair and blue eyes”Unfortunately, this standard is unattainable forthe majority of young women.
  18. 18. How does the mediainfluence young women?#2: The media uses unhealthyand unrealistic images to show“flaws” and “ideal body images”in order to sell products orideals.
  19. 19. “Flaws”“thin body ideal may be just as effectivelycommunicated by the portrayal of fatnessas an undesirable trait”
  20. 20. “Flaws”Some companies are fighting for achange in advertising techniques thatutilize flaws.
  21. 21. “Ideal Body Images”These “attractive”young are shownto make productsappealing.
  22. 22. “Ideal Body Images”This ad states by depiction that“attractive” women are thin.
  23. 23. How does the mediainfluence young women?#3: The Media is everywhere.
  24. 24. New technology allows the media to beeverywhere.
  25. 25. The increased presence ofmedia makes it hard to escapethe media’s negativemessages.Increase in Smartphone Sales:
  26. 26. Being overwhelmed bynegative messages has beenproven to increase thelikelihood of developing bodydissatisfaction and possibly aneating disorder.
  27. 27. When researchers showed college agedwomen only 10 minutes of footagedisplaying thinness as an ideal trait, thewomen expressed “higher rates ofdepression, anger, weight dissatisfaction,and overall appearance dissatisfaction.”
  28. 28. With the media’s increasedpresence, you may think that thisproblem will never end…
  29. 29. With the media’s increasedpresence, you may think that thisproblem will never end…With your help itcan!
  30. 30. One in 10American women struggle with some form of bodydissatisfaction.
  31. 31. One in 10American women struggle with some form of bodydissatisfaction.This means that you likely know awoman who is hurting.
  32. 32. Help them by spreadingawareness about the media’snegative messages and lies.
  33. 33. Help them by spreadingawareness about the media’snegative messages and lies.Encourage them andsupport healthy lifechoices.
  34. 34. No one should ever say anyof the following statements:
  35. 35. No one should ever say anyof the following statements:“Magazine articles are an importantsource of information about fashionand being attractive.”“I’ve felt pressure form TVand magazines to loseweight.”
  36. 36. “Magazine articles are an importantsource of information about fashionand being attractive.”No one should ever say anyof the following statements:“I’ve felt pressure form TVand magazines to loseweight.”“I would like my body tolook like the people whoare on TV.”
  37. 37. Lives are precious and life is too short
  38. 38. Lives are precious and life is too shortfor anyone to battle feelings ofbody dissatisfaction
  39. 39. Lives are precious and life istoo shortfor anyone to battle feelings ofbody dissatisfactionor an eating disorder becausehe or she does not meet themedia’s standards.
  40. 40. Shouldn’t everyone be able towatch T.V., read a magazine, orcheck Facebook and not feeldissatisfied with his or her bodyafterwards?
  41. 41. ReferencesSlide7: Beresin, E. V., & Derenne, J. L. (2006). Body image, media, and eating disorders.Academic Psychiatry, 30, 257-261. Retrieved from http://ap.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=50181Slide 9: Going to extremes: Eating disorders. (n.d.) CNN Health. Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2012/03/health/infographic.eating.disorders/index.htmSlide 10: DSM IV. (2005). Collins Dictionary of Medicine. Retrieved from http://www.credoreference.com/entry/collinsmed/dsm_ivSlides 12,13,16-18: Heinberg, L.J., & Thompson, J.K. (1999). The media’s influence onbody image disturbance and eating disorders: We’ve reviled them, now can werehabilitate them? Journal of Social Issues, 55(2), 339-353. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/0022-4537.00119/abstractSlide 19: Harrison, K. (2000). The body electric: Thin-ideal media and eating disorders inadolescents. Journal of Communication, 119-143. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2000.tb02856.x/pdfSlides 24,27: Heinberg, L.J., & Thompson, J.K. (1999). The media’s influence on bodyimage disturbance and eating disorders: We’ve reviled them, now can werehabilitate them? Journal of Social Issues, 55(2), 339-353. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/0022-4537.00119/abstract
  42. 42. Slides 30,31: Going to extremes: Eating disorders. (n.d.) CNN Health. Retrieved fromhttp://www.cnn.com/interactive/2012/03/health/infographic.eating.disorders/index.htmSlides 32,33: Beresin, E. V., & Derenne, J. L. (2006). Body image, media, and eatingdisorders. Academic Psychiatry, 30, 257-261. Retrieved from http://ap.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=50181Slides 35, 36: Calogero, R.M., Davis W.N., & Thompson, J.K. (2005). The role of self-objectification in the experience of women with eating disorders. Sex Roles, 52,43-50. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/article/ 10.1007%2Fs11199-005-1192-9#page-1Created by McKenna Bireley 4/25/13

×