What is the occupy movement
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What is the occupy movement

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This lesson was designed for ESL students at a Jr. High level and above. It introduces the Occupy Movement and is meant to give students enough information to have a discussion and share opinions at ...

This lesson was designed for ESL students at a Jr. High level and above. It introduces the Occupy Movement and is meant to give students enough information to have a discussion and share opinions at the end of the lesson. There is a link to a news video at the end which students are expected to be able to answer questions about. This is meant to give the students authentic listening practice.

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  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occupy_Wall_Street
  • http://occupywallst.org/
  • Enforce: to put, keep, or make others do as one says, follow rules, laws etc. Riot: noisy and violent public disorder. Riot police are specially trained to deal with such situations. Mellow: free from worry, very relaxed
  • 4-5 months 4 to 11 people

What is the occupy movement What is the occupy movement Presentation Transcript

  • September 17th, 2011 to Present
  • oc·cu·py  verb 1.to take or fill up (space, time, etc.)2.to take possession and control of (a place), as by military invasion.pro·test noun1.an expression or statement of resistance, disapproval, ordissent, often in opposition to something a person ispowerless to prevent or avoid: a protest against the warWall Street noun1.a street in New York City, in South Manhattan: the major financial center of the U.S.2.the money market or the financiers of the U.S.movement  noun 1. a) group of people with a common ideology, esp. a political or religious one b) the organized action of such a group
  • fi·nan·cial adjective1.pertaining to monetary receipts and spending;  relating to money matters2.of or relating to those commonly engaged in dealing with money and credit.dis·trict noun1.a division of territory, as of a country, state, or county, marked off for governmental thingsac·tiv·ist noun1.an especially active,  strong supporter of a cause, especially a political cause.in·e·qual·i·ty noun1.the condition of being unequal; lack of equality;  inequality of size and power.in·i·ti·ate  verb1.to begin, startun·em·ploy·ment noun1.The state of being unemployed, having no job especially not by choice2. The number of people who don’t have jobscor·rup·tion noun1. The act of being dishonest, doing things that are harmful to others, but good for you. 
  • What is Occupy WallStreet?Occupy Wall Street is a protest movement that began September 17, 2011 in Zuccotti Park, located in New York City’s Wall Street financial district, initiated by the Canadian activist group Adbusters. The protests are against social and economic inequality, high unemployment, greed, as well as corruption and the undue influence of corporations on government—particularly from the financial services sector.
  • The protesters slogan We arethe 99% refers to thegrowing income and wealthinequality in the U.S. betweenthe wealthiest 1% and the restof the population. The protestsin New York City have sparkedsimilar Occupy protests andmovements around the world. A list of events for the 15 October 2011global protests lists events in 951 citiesin 82 countries:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Occupy_movement_protest_locations
  • After months of protest andoccupation in cities acrossAmerica, government and policehave cracked down and raidedmany protest areas.Governments use the reasons ofnoise, garbage, and rodents ascause for their decision to getinvolved.
  • You will watch a short video from the first week ofFebruary in Washington D.C., U.S.A.. The police started toenforce a ban on overnight camping at the Occupy D.C.camp. McPherson Square had been the headquarters ofthe movement up till then when riot police came in toremove the protestors.Reports say this was a calm and mellow camp up till themoment the police came in. Some reporters say after 5pm,when it became dark, the police came in and startedhitting people. Reporters were told to put their camerasaway. Police made a human wall to block the view of whatwas happening. It is said that this has happened across thecountry.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELUTMrcqBpI&feature=youtu.beThings to think about while watching the video:1. How long have they been reporting on Occupy Wall Street?2. How would you describe the feelings and emotions in area where protestors andpolice met?3. Do you think the police acted correctly from what you saw? Why or why not?4. Are there any situations when police should be able to hit and beat people?5. How does the guest on the show describe what it was like there during the daybefore it became dark? Was he surprised?6. How many people were arrested?7. Does this news surprise you?8. Does it change what you think about America? Why or why not?