Decomposers

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Decomposers

  1. 1. Decomposers<br />By E.T.<br />
  2. 2. What are decomposers?<br />Vital components of the nutrient cycle<br />An organism, often a bacterium or fungus, that feeds on and breaks down dead plant or animal matter, thus making organic nutrients available to the ecosystem.<br />
  3. 3. Scavengers <br />Animals that find dead animals or plants and eat them<br />help break down or reduce organic material into smaller pieces <br />Examples:<br />Flies<br /> Wasps <br /> Cockroaches <br />Earthworms(only break down plants)<br />
  4. 4. Different kinds of decomposers<br /> are organisms that break down dead or decaying organisms, and in doing so carry out the natural process of decomposition<br /> Examples:<br /><ul><li>Fungi
  5. 5. Bacteria
  6. 6. Worms</li></li></ul><li>Fungi<br /><ul><li>Fungi ≠ Plants
  7. 7. over 50,000 species of fungi</li></ul> E.g.:<br /> mushrooms, <br /> mildew, <br /> mold, <br /> toadstools,<br /> etc.<br /><ul><li>Penicillin and other antibiotics are made from fungi.</li></li></ul><li>Bacteria <br /><ul><li>Prokaryotic (no nucleus)
  8. 8. recycle dead plants and animals by turning them into minerals and nutrients that plants can use
  9. 9. only see them with a microscope</li></li></ul><li>Worms<br /><ul><li>Hermaphroditic (have both male and female organs)
  10. 10. Earthworms eat dead plants and animals
  11. 11. excrete wastes in the form of casts (rich in nutrients like nitrogen, phosphorus, and potash)
  12. 12. loosen the soil</li></li></ul><li>How decomposers decompose dead things?<br />1. A fungus releases enzymes on to the dead remains<br />2. The enzymes digest the dead matter and make it soluble <br />3. The soluble products are taken up by the fungus <br />
  13. 13. What would happen if decomposer's are removed from the ecosystem?<br />
  14. 14. Bibliography <br />academics.uww.edu Retrieved on 7th June,2011 20:20<br />http://academics.uww.edu/cni/webquest/HallOfFame/decomposers/decomposer.htm<br />Decomposer Bacteria. Retrieved on 8th June,2011 from<br />http://www.earth-cards.com/pseudomonas_bacteria.htm<br />fungi, telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved on 8th June,2011 20:31 from<br />http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/picturegalleries/earth/3234942/More-Telegraph-readers-pictures-of-autumn-colours-in-Britain.html?image=3<br /><ul><li>microbiologyonline.org.uk Retrieved on 7th June,2011 21:30</li></ul>http://www.microbiologyonline.org.uk/about-microbiology/introducing-microbes/fungi<br />nextnature.net Retrieved on 7th June,2011 21:42<br />http://www.nextnature.net/2008/12/bacteria-that-eat-waste-shit-petrol/<br />Thefreedictionary.com Retrieved on 7th June,2011 20:13<br />http://www.thefreedictionary.com/decomposer<br />worsleyschool.net Retrieved on 8th June,2011 17:21<br />http://www.worsleyschool.net/science/files/decomposers/page.html<br />
  15. 15. Bibliography <br />New Biology for You Gareth Williams <br />Retrieved on 8th Jane, 2011 17:53<br />

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