Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Asian American Philanthropy to Higher Education
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Asian American Philanthropy to Higher Education

303

Published on

November 11, 2011

November 11, 2011

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
303
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Any person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. It includes Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Korean, Japanese, Vietnamese, and Other Asian."
    Pacific Islander is in a separate category (Oceania, Australia)
  • Family
    Filial piety - Confucius says, ―Exemplary persons (junzi) concentrate their efforts on the root, for the root having taken hold, the way (dao) will grow there from. As for filial and fraternal responsibility, it is, I suspect, the root of benevolence (ren)‖ (The Analects 1.2 in Ames, 1998, p. 71).
    Learning from parents, grandparents: “―in a moment of happiness, don‘t forget to give to charity”
    You’re part of the community, you should give back to it. Exposure to civic environment. – Grandpa, parents
  • Religion
    Confucianism – self effacement, frugality, generosity as a private matter (also Buddhism)
    Christianity –
    Korean Americans, particularly immigrants, possess various ‘indigenous’ traditions of philanthropy. These include practices of informal giving to extended family and other close relations, such as friends or fellow church members; and church-based giving and volunteering, which are social norms among the 70-80 percent of Korean Americans who identify as Christian. Though the popularity of western-style philanthropy is growing throughout the diaspora, a good deal of giving, particularly among immigrants, takes these forms.
    Hinduism
    Hindu religion, also known as Sanatana Dharma ( sustainable righteous conduct ), has an equivalent term dana ( giving ) for philanthropy. Dana ( giving ) is a fertile field for understanding the meanings and justifications of giving in religious, ethical, moral, theological, political, economic, and sociological contexts. Philanthropy brings name, fame, recognition and prosperity to the giver and his/her family in the here and now and enhances the quality of life for them after death.
    Role of guanxi - consequently, many Chinese Americans, especially first-generation immigrants, are less likely to make planned gifts or leave bequests to charities.
  • Learning and study is the hallmark of Confucianism. This traditional focus on education is explicitly documented in the first teaching of The Analects:
    Having studies, to then repeatedly apply what you have learned—is this not a source of pleasure? To have friends come from distant quarters—is this not a source of enjoyment? To go unacknowledged by others without harboring frustration—is this not the mark of an exemplary person (junzi)? (Ames, 1998, p. 71)
    Asian Pacific Islander cultures highly value education
    Desire an education at a prestigious institution
    Often perceive that community colleges are “second rate” or “second choice”
  • Evolved as greater engagement in American civic society
    Volunteer experiences
  • America gave me the opportunities to shape who I am today
    Desire to help the next generation of Asian Americans become successful
  • Tax benefits – not primary but secondary benefit
    Naming opportunities – a strong incentive. High correlation between mega gifts and named gifts after donors – about the thank you, not about the name.
    Many gifts names after family units not individual donors
    Making college degrees valuable – improved prestige of the alma mater would make one’s degree more valuable
  • It’s the right thing to do
    Warm glow of giving
    Perceived impacts of gifts to society more important than recognition
  • Positive college experiences – attribute professional success to college experience – fundamental skills and knowledge to thrive in America
    Received scholarship – for many immigrants, the only way to go to school.
    Influence by school’s philanthropic philosophy – generous financial aid, learning about philanthropy in college, volunteer service in college
    Student-mentor relationships – those developed in college – a personal relationship, especially of those who immigrated and were alone.
    Met his or her partner during college – memorable time with significant others
  • donors active engagement with alumni relations
  • Advancing Asian American communities – helping Asian American students, Asian American studies programs, Asian cultural programs
    The extended family of Asian Americans
    Improving US-Asia relations
    Work in companies that have US and Asia presence
    Supporting scholarly exchange programs
    Celebrating Asian American University leadership
    Supporting leadership and future endeavors
  • Stimulate others to follow their example
    “The institution asked us to use their names”
  • Personal interests and values, involvement, align with charitable gifts
  • Chinese American donors embraced Chinese beliefs in higher education. Donors believed that higher education is a fundamental path to overcome any forms of prejudice and to prosper in life. Particularly for people from low-income family backgrounds, higher education opens up doors of opportunities.
    giving to higher education advances society as a whole.
  • Husband-wife
    Parent-son
    Elder-younger brother
    Friend-friend
  • Another notable trend is former graduates of American institutions in China giving internationally to their alma maters in the U.S. This includes Chinese entrepreneurs, former student immigrants who returned back to their home country after the dot-com collapse in 2000. Additionally, former student immigrants are now sending their children back to U.S. institutions. Although they live overseas, these individuals feel grateful for not only their own but also for their children‘s educational experiences in the U.S.
  • Donors stated that introducing the concept of philanthropy to students is the first stage of fundraising. Universities need to create campus climates that celebrate the value of voluntary support. Although college students are not economically capable of giving, shared acknowledgement of philanthropic needs generate future contributions. offer a course on philanthropy and fundraising that ―talks about the charity and public contribution, and basically how you pay back to the society that type of lecture or class
  • The second stage involves ―giving‖ to alumni for further strengthened relationships. One way is to demonstrate institutional involvement with Asian American communities. Universities could acknowledge the community by resolving issues among Asian American students specifically. I think they should acknowledge, first of all, that the Asian American community is getting to be more and more of a presence in this country and have needs. So many of them apply for college, and they are in needs. A lot of them do have needs.
  • Developing targeted strategies for Asian American donors based on their ethnic, professional, and personal interests. The ethnic-specific alumni programs promote institutional attachments among Asian American alumni, particularly among those who feel a strong affinity to the Asian American community. They have not thrown parties for Asian donors, put it that way, at least that I know of. Something like that will make you feel like you‘re kind of exclusive, privileged or elite. They haven't done anything like that.
    universities could celebrate Asian heritage by promoting Asian American leadership in the university administration. As mentioned above, a nomination of an Asian American leader at a public university attracted tremendous amounts of donations from Asian American donors. Likewise, universities could ―give to alumni through appointing Asian American leaders in administrative positions.
     
     
  • University presidents, deans, faculty, and development officers are all key actors who identify and strategize fundraising efforts. Besides these university personnel, donors suggested involving prominent Asian American leaders. Asian traditional beliefs celebrate absolute obedience and respect for elder members of the community. If these Asian American leaders from the community or business enterprises engage in asking, prospects will have a hard time rejecting their offers.
  • Universities need to recruit development officers who understand Asian American culture and norms. Effective development officers for Asian American donors do not necessarily have to be Asian Americans. More importantly, these are individuals who understand cultural nuances that are unique to Asian American donors. Qualified candidates are those who are actively involved in the Asian American community, people who are very well-networked and well aware of communal needs.
  • Throughout this ―taking process, universities should not ask for monetary donations directly, but instead focus on developing trustworthy personal relationships.
    I think the American approach for many Asian donors would not work very well. You need to know how to wine and dine and then when to ask. And it‘s different for different people. Part of it is cultural, part of it is personal. So you really have to have both skills. And some Americans have that: you can really understand the cultural niceties but not all of them, whereas most Asian who grow up will understand. If they don‘t know they know who to ask… Find a really good either Asian American or American who lived in Asia who is in development who understands the cultural nuances. Or, find an Asian American donor who has very enthusiastically supported your organization who can help you develop an Asian initiative and help you hire somebody who can understand it. I met a lot of non-Asian Americans who lived in Asia who could be very good at doing this because they really get it. But I don‘t think I ever met any American non-Asian in development who could do as good of a job.
    There is no right timing. You never know when they will be ready. You just have to continue to have interactions with them. Say hi to them, invite them to this and that. I have seen so many cases where a family gives a few thousand or maybe a hundred thousand in the last ten years, and suddenly they give about five million.
  • So thank you very much. I’m happy to answer questions later on during the Q&A session, or you can contact me at the Council as well. Thank you!
  • Transcript

    • 1. Asian American Philanthropy to Higher Education Council on Resource Development November 11, 2011 Washington, DC Andrew Ho Council on Foundations
    • 2. About Me www.cof.org www.asianamericangiving.com www.aapip.org dcgivingcircle.wordpress.com
    • 3. Who is Asian American? Source: Wikipedia, “Asian American” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_American
    • 4. Who is Asian American? As of July 1, 2008: • 304 million U.S. population • 15.5 million Asian alone or in combination, 5.1% of the U.S. population Top 5 States by Population Size: California 5,073,000 New York 1,484,000 Texas 956,000 New Jersey 711,000 Hawaii 696,000 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 National Population Estimates, July 1 and April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2008
    • 5. Who is Asian American? Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey
    • 6. Who is Asian American? Personal and household income distribution, by race/ethnicity Race/ethnic Type of group income Asian Americans Hispanic or Latino African Americans SOURCE: US Census Bureau, 2006 $25k$50k Persons White Poverty <$25k N/A 35.6% Households 8.6% Persons N/A $50k$75k $75k$100k >$100k 35.2% 14.5% 6.9% 7.2% 24.9% 26.3% 18.9% 11.6% 18.3% 33.5% 29.8% 18.1% 8.0% 10.6% Households 10.1% 20.9% 19.3% 19.2% 13.1% 27.5% Persons N/A 49.4% 36.5% 9.0% 2.6% 2.6% Households 18.3% 37.7% 29.7% 17.2% 6.6% 8.8% Persons N/A 41.3% 37.0% 15.7% 3.5% 2.6% Households 22.3% 43.1% 26.8% 15.1% 7.3% 7.8%
    • 7. Role of Family in the Development of Philanthropy
    • 8. Role of Religion and Culture Confucianism Christianity Sources: Confucianism, http://drum.lib.umd.edu/bitstream/1903/11702/1/Tsunoda_umd_0117E_12136.pdf Christianity, http://asianphilanthropy.org/?p=346#more-346 Hinduism, http://learningtogive.org/faithgroups/voices/phil_persp_of_hinduism.asp Hinduism
    • 9. Role of Education
    • 10. Role of Community and Society
    • 11. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 12. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 13. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 14. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 15. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 16. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 17. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 18. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 19. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 20. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 21. Ten Motivations of Asian Americans to Give to U.S. Higher Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Sense of duty to support American society Donor’s desires for personal benefits Self-satisfaction and the joy of giving Reciprocal incentives from college experiences Institutional attachment to alma mater Individual affinity to Asian American communities Demonstrating philanthropic leadership in the Asian American community 8. Personal attachment to charitable gifts 9. Traditional beliefs in higher education 10. Filial piety and fraternal responsibility Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 22. Donor Perceptions of Effective University Fundraising Strategies  Introducing the concept of philanthropy to Asian American students  Institutional involvement with Asian American alumni  Developing targeted strategies for Asian American donors  Involving Asian American community leaders in asking  Recruiting development officers with cultural sensitivity  Avoid Asking, and Build Trustworthy Relationships Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 23. Donor Perceptions of Effective University Fundraising Strategies  Introducing the concept of philanthropy to Asian American students  Institutional involvement with Asian American alumni  Developing targeted strategies for Asian American donors  Involving Asian American community leaders in asking  Recruiting development officers with cultural sensitivity  Avoid Asking, and Build Trustworthy Relationships Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 24. Donor Perceptions of Effective University Fundraising Strategies  Introducing the concept of philanthropy to Asian American students  Institutional involvement with Asian American alumni  Developing targeted strategies for Asian American donors  Involving Asian American community leaders in asking  Recruiting development officers with cultural sensitivity  Avoid Asking, and Build Trustworthy Relationships Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 25. Donor Perceptions of Effective University Fundraising Strategies  Introducing the concept of philanthropy to Asian American students  Institutional involvement with Asian American alumni  Developing targeted strategies for Asian American donors  Involving Asian American community leaders in asking  Recruiting development officers with cultural sensitivity  Avoid Asking, and Build Trustworthy Relationships Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 26. Donor Perceptions of Effective University Fundraising Strategies  Introducing the concept of philanthropy to Asian American students  Institutional involvement with Asian American alumni  Developing targeted strategies for Asian American donors  Involving Asian American community leaders in asking  Recruiting development officers with cultural sensitivity  Avoid Asking, and Build Trustworthy Relationships Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 27. Donor Perceptions of Effective University Fundraising Strategies  Introducing the concept of philanthropy to Asian American students  Institutional involvement with Asian American alumni  Developing targeted strategies for Asian American donors  Involving Asian American community leaders in asking  Recruiting development officers with cultural sensitivity  Avoid Asking, and Build Trustworthy Relationships Source: “Unraveling the Myths of Chinese American Giving: Exploring Donor Motivations and Effective Fundraising Strategies for the U.S. Higher Education” K. Tsunoda
    • 28. Contact Information Andrew Ho Council on Foundations Manager, Global Philanthropy Email: Andrew.Ho@cof.org Phone: (703) 879-0743 Twitter: @andyho www.cof.org www.asianamericangiving.com www.linkedin.com/in/andyho

    ×