Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Peanut butter case study!
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Peanut butter case study!

192
views

Published on

PEANUT BUTTER JELLLYYYYYY ! Peanut butter jellllllly.............. …

PEANUT BUTTER JELLLYYYYYY ! Peanut butter jellllllly..............

PEANUT BUTTER JELLY, PEANUT BUTTER JELLY, PEANUT BUTTER JELLY with a baseball bat !!


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
192
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Manufactured by:
    Ambika Sharma, Erica Choi and Kimberly Balao
    Case Study One: The Peanut Butter is Tainted
  • 2. Patient Situation:
    Symptoms
    Diarrhea
    Fever
    Abdominal Pains
    Lasts About 4-7 Days
    Some cases of Diarrhea was so bad that some had to be hospitalized.
    By the Numbers!
    425 People from 44 States experienced these symptoms.
    Out of the 351 persons with clinical information, 71 of them had to be hospitalized.
  • 3. Affected System
    DIGESTIVE SYSTEM!
  • 4. Our Specific Patient:
    Experienced Stomach Cramping, Diarrhea, and Moderately High Temperature.
    Sixteen Hours Prior: He consumed a peanut butter sandwich.
    Could this be the answer to our patient’s problem? LET’S FIND OUT!
    We cultured our patient’s fecal matter to find the etiological agent of his illness.
  • 5. Possible Culprits:
    1. Escherichia coli(-)
    2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (-)
    3. Salmonella enterica (-)
    4. Staphylococcus aureus(+)
    5. Streptococcus pyogenes (-)
    6. Haemophilusinfluenzae (-)
  • 6. How Do We Determine Which Bacteria?
    Find if the patient bacteria is gram (+) or gram (-)
    • Why?: The culprits are either known as gram (+) or gram (-). Know the patients gram, and we can eliminate answers.
    • 7. Through methods of staining, we are able to conclude that our bacteria is gram (-)
    WE WILL BE USING MCONKEY AGAR as our differential media.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWrjQoRcp1g&feature=channel_video_title
  • 8. Staphylococcus aureus(+)
    Escherichia coli(-)
    Patient(-)
  • 9. Results ofMacConkey Agar
    • Agar had Patient Sample & E. coli.
    • 10. E. Coli was very pink in agar.
    • 11. Why?: E. coli is capable of fermenting lactose in the agar.
    • 12. Our patient had no bright pink color, we are looking for a gram (-) bacteria that is incapable of fermenting bacteria.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BF5WsU7I6A
  • 13. Possible Culprits:
    1. Escherichia coli(-)
    2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (-)
    3. Salmonella enterica (-)
    4. Staphylococcus aureus(+)
    5. Streptococcus pyogenes (+)
    6. Haemophilusinfluenzae (-)
  • 14. Salmonella Enterica
    Salmonella is a rod-shaped motile bacteria.
    This can be classified in the bacilli group of bacteria, and it has a flagella which makes it motile.
    Salmonella is arranged in a cluster-tetrad form which can be seen under a microscope.
    This bacteria has a unique way of infecting host cells, it uses a “syringe” technique in which it injects a protein called SipA. This protein essentially ruffles the outside of the cell, allowing the salmonella bacteria to enter and then replicate.
    Salmonella is an anaerobic bacteria that can survive under low Oxygen conditions
  • 15. Epidemiology of Salmonella Enterica
    It can be found usually in food or water, and it affects the gastrointestinal region of humans
    Salmonella can also affect deeper parts of the human body like bone marrow due to their unique way of invading cells.
    Spread through the fecal-oral route (once excreted it in released into the environment and can infect it’s surrounding)
  • 16. Salmonella Enterica Cont.
    Symptoms
    Salmonella, after it is ingested, produces hydrogen sulfide which causes the cells of the intestinal walls to become disorganized so that the the bacteria is engulfed
    The protein SipA then is injected into these cells via salmonella to “staple” actin filaments together and make curtain-like folds which allows it to engulf the bacteria
    It is then taken to the liver or the spleen.
    Salmonella has many evolved mechanisms that prevent our immune system from doing their job efficiently.
    Patient might have typhoid fever.
    This bacterium is a causative of typhoid fever.
    Symptoms include:
    Abdominal Cramps
    Vomiting
    Nausea
    Usually lasts up to seven days.
    How It Affects the Body
  • 17.
  • 18. Our Antibiotic Results:
    Chloramphenicol
    Gentamicin
    Penicillin
    Streptomycin
    Tetracyclin
    Vancomycin
  • 19. Chloramphenicol
    A prototypical broad-spectrum antibiotic
    Bacteriostatic
    Prevents synthesis of peptide bonds
    Effective against a variety of Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria
    Can be taken topically, orally or intravenously.
    Toxic, so it is only reserved for use doing serious cases.
  • 20. Real Salmonella Outbreaks!
    http://injurylawblog.the-injury-lawyer-directory.com/2011/03/10/skippy-peanut-butter-recalled-for-salmonella-contamination/

×