SUBMITTED BY:-
NAME: YASH SAWARKAR
SECTION:A
BRANCH: ELECTRONIC
TEACHER ASSESSMENT EXAM:-
TOPIC -CRYSTAL OSCILLATOR
CONTENTS
 INTRODUCTION
 OPERATION
 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AND MATERIALS
 BASIC HARMONIC OSCILLATOR STRUCTUE
 FREQUENCY RES...
INTRODUCTION
 A crystal oscillator is an electronic oscillator circuit that uses the
mechanical resonance of a vibrating ...
OPERATION
 A crystal is a solid in which the
constituent atoms, molecules, or ions are packed in a
regularly ordered, rep...
 When a crystal of quartz is properly cut and mounted, it can be made to distort
in an electric field by applying a volta...
THESE CIRCUITS ARE DESIGNED FOR NON-CRITICAL ADJUSTMENT AND OPERATION WITH
EASILY AVAILABLE COMPONENTS. IN EACH CASE, AN O...
CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AND MATERIALS
 The most common material for oscillator crystals is quartz. At the beginning of
the tech...
 Quartz exists in several phases. At 573 °C at 1 atmosphere (and at higher
temperatures and higher pressures) the α-quart...
BASIC HARMONIC OSCILLATOR STRUCTUE
Positive feedback system (>0)
FREQUENCY RESPONSE OF A CRYSTAL OSCILLATOR
 Multisim circuit. The series resistor has been adjusted to give 50/50 voltage...
 Since the series-tuned circuit acts as an inductor above the resonant point, the
crystal unit becomes equivalent to an i...
EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT OF A CRYSTAL OSCILLATOR
 Multisim circuit.
Series resistance determined from 50/50 voltage division.
...
APPLICATIONS
 Military & Aerospace
 Communications
 Electronic warfare
 Fuses
 Guidance systems
 IFF (Identification...
 Automotive
 Engine control, stereo, clock
 Trip computer
 GPS
 Consumer
 Cable TV systems
 CB & amateur radio
 Ce...
THANK YOU
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Crystal oscillator

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Crystal oscillator

  1. 1. SUBMITTED BY:- NAME: YASH SAWARKAR SECTION:A BRANCH: ELECTRONIC TEACHER ASSESSMENT EXAM:- TOPIC -CRYSTAL OSCILLATOR
  2. 2. CONTENTS  INTRODUCTION  OPERATION  CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AND MATERIALS  BASIC HARMONIC OSCILLATOR STRUCTUE  FREQUENCY RESPONSE OF A CRYSTAL OSCILLATOR  EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT OF A CRYSTAL OSCILLATOR  APPLICATIONS
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION  A crystal oscillator is an electronic oscillator circuit that uses the mechanical resonance of a vibrating crystal of piezoelectric material to create an electrical signal with a very precise frequency This frequency is commonly used to keep track of time (as in quartz wristwatches), to provide a stable clock signal for digital integrated circuits, and to stabilize frequencies for radio transmitters and receivers. The most common type of piezoelectric resonator used is the quartz crystal, so oscillatorcircuits incorporating them became known as crystal oscillators,but other piezoelectric materials including polycry stalline ceramics are used in similar circuits.  Quartz crystal resonator (left)  quartz crystal oscillator (right)
  4. 4. OPERATION  A crystal is a solid in which the constituent atoms, molecules, or ions are packed in a regularly ordered, repeating pattern extending in all three spatial dimensions.  Almost any object made of an elastic material could be used like a crystal, with appropriate transducers, since all objects have natural resonant frequencies of vibration. For example, steel is very elastic and has a high speed of sound. It was often used in mechanical filters before quartz. The resonant frequency depends on size, shape, elasticity, and the speed of sound in the material. High-frequency crystals are typically cut in the shape of a simple, rectangular plate. Low-frequency crystals, such as those used in digital watches, are typically cut in the shape of a tuning fork. For applications not needing very precise timing, a low-cost ceramic resonator is often used in place of a quartz crystal.
  5. 5.  When a crystal of quartz is properly cut and mounted, it can be made to distort in an electric field by applying a voltage to an electrode near or on the crystal. This property is known as electrostriction or inverse piezoelectricity. When the field is removed, the quartz will generate an electric field as it returns to its previous shape, and this can generate a voltage. The result is that a quartz crystal behaves like a circuit composed of an inductor, capacitor and resistor, with a precise resonant frequency.
  6. 6. THESE CIRCUITS ARE DESIGNED FOR NON-CRITICAL ADJUSTMENT AND OPERATION WITH EASILY AVAILABLE COMPONENTS. IN EACH CASE, AN OUTPUT OF AT LEAST 500 MILLIVOLTS RMS IS AVAILABLE ACROSS A LOAD OF 1000 OHMS IN PARALLEL WITH 15 PF. THE CIRCUITS ARE SUITABLE FOR USE WITH SUPPLY VOLTAGES FROM 5 TO 10 VOLTS DC. OVER THIS VOLTAGE RANGE FREQUENCY STABILITIES OF 0.001% (10 PPM) SHOULD BE ACHIEVED.
  7. 7. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AND MATERIALS  The most common material for oscillator crystals is quartz. At the beginning of the technology, natural quartz crystals were used; now synthetic crystalline quartz grown by hydrothermal synthesis is predominant due to higher purity, lower cost, and more convenient handling. One of the few remaining uses of natural crystals is for pressure transducers in deep wells. During World War II and for some time afterwards, natural quartz was considered a strategic material by the USA  Two types of quartz crystals exist: left-handed and right-handed, differing in the optical rotation but identical in other physical properties. Both left and right- handed crystals can be used for oscillators, if the cut angle is correct. In manufacture, right-handed quartz is generally used.The SiO4tetrahedrons form parallel helixes; the direction of twist of the helix determines the left- or right- hand orientation. The helixes are aligned along the z-axis and merged, sharing atoms. The mass of the helixes forms a mesh of small and large channels parallel to the z-axis; the large ones are large enough to allow some mobility of smaller ions and molecules through the crystal
  8. 8.  Quartz exists in several phases. At 573 °C at 1 atmosphere (and at higher temperatures and higher pressures) the α-quartz undergoes quartz inversion, transforms reversibly to β-quartz. The reverse process however is not entirely homogeneous and crystal twinning occurs. Care has to be taken during manufacture and processing to avoid the phase transformation. Other phases, e.g. the higher-temperature phases tridymite and cristobalite, are not significant for oscillators. All quartz oscillator crystals are the α-quartz type.  Cluster of natural quartz crystals(LEFT)  Tuning fork crystal(RIGHT)
  9. 9. BASIC HARMONIC OSCILLATOR STRUCTUE Positive feedback system (>0)
  10. 10. FREQUENCY RESPONSE OF A CRYSTAL OSCILLATOR  Multisim circuit. The series resistor has been adjusted to give 50/50 voltage division at the resonant frequency
  11. 11.  Since the series-tuned circuit acts as an inductor above the resonant point, the crystal unit becomes equivalent to an inductor and is parallel with the equivalent capacitor C1. At some frequency above the series-resonant point, the crystal unit will act as a parallel-tuned circuit. A parallel-tuned circuit has a MAXIMUM impedance at the parallel-resonant frequency and acts inductively below parallel resonance Therefore, at some frequency, depending upon the cut of the crystal, the crystal unit will act as a parallel-tuned circuit.  AC analysis showing voltage across the crystal.
  12. 12. EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT OF A CRYSTAL OSCILLATOR  Multisim circuit. Series resistance determined from 50/50 voltage division.  Other values typical of XOs C1 is due to electrodes C2 & L1 are resonating xtal R1 is mechanical loss
  13. 13. APPLICATIONS  Military & Aerospace  Communications  Electronic warfare  Fuses  Guidance systems  IFF (Identification Friend or Foe)  Navigation  Radar  Sensors  Sonobouys  Research and Measurement  Astronomy and Geodesy  Celestrial navigation  Instruments  Medical Instrument/Devices  Space tracking
  14. 14.  Automotive  Engine control, stereo, clock  Trip computer  GPS  Consumer  Cable TV systems  CB & amateur radio  Cellular & cordless  Color TV  Home computers  Pacemakers and other medical devices  Phones, pagers  Radio & hi-fi equipment  Toys & games  VCR & video camera  Watches & clocks  Industrial  Aviation  Communications  Computers  CRT displays  Digital systems
  15. 15. THANK YOU
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