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Bacterial meningitis
Bacterial meningitis
Bacterial meningitis
Bacterial meningitis
Bacterial meningitis
Bacterial meningitis
Bacterial meningitis
Bacterial meningitis
Bacterial meningitis
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Bacterial meningitis

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  • 1. Bacterial Meningitis Sophia Block
  • 2. General Inflammation of meninges (membranes surrounding the skull and spinal cord) Acute bacteria meningitis most commonly caused by bacteria entering bloodstream Bacteria can directly enter meninges from ear/sinus infection or skull fracture Acute bacteria meningitis infections extremely serious  May result in death or brain damage even if treated  Medical emergency
  • 3. Types of Bacterial Meningitis Pneumococcal – most common type in US for infants children and adults. Caused by bacteria streptococcus pneumoniae which more commonly causes pneumonia, ear infections, or sinus infections Meningococcal - another leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Caused when upper respiratory infections enter bloodstream and is highly contagious. Effects mostly teenagers/young adults especially in dorms boarding schools military bases. Caused by bacteria neisseriameningitidis.
  • 4. Types of Bacterial Meningitis Haemophilus Influenza type b (Hib) - leading cause of bacterial meningitis before 1990s in children. New vaccines make it less common. Caused by bacteria haemaphilusinfluenzae. Meningitis generally comes after upper respiratory infection, ear infection, or sinusitis. Listeriosis – caused by bacteria listeriamonocytogenes which are found almost everywhere. In soft cheese, hot dogs, and luncheon meats; many animals carry bacteria. Most healthy people don’t get infected from this. More susceptible to pregnant women, newborns, and older adults. People most vulnerable when have weakened immune system.
  • 5. Symptoms Symptoms of meningitis similar to symptoms of flu Symptoms start over several hours or over 1/2 days Symptoms for people over the age of 2 include:  High fever  Severe headache (not easily confused with other type of headache)  Stiff neck  Vomiting/nausea with headache  Confusion/ difficulty concentrating (if very young appear as inability to maintain eye contact)  Seizures  Sleepiness/difficulty waking up  Sensitivity to light  Lack of interest in drinking and eating  Skin rash (in meningococcal)
  • 6. Symptoms Symptoms in newborns  High fever  Constant crying  Excessive sleepiness or irritability  Inactivity or sluggishness  Poor feeding  Fontanel (bulge in soft spot on baby’s head)  Stiffness in body or neck  Seizures  Difficult to comfort
  • 7. Risk Factors  Not completing childhood vaccines  Median age of diagnosis 25 years  Living in close quarters (meningococcal)  Pregnancy (listeriosis)  Working with animals (listeriosis)  Compromised immune system (from Aids, spleen removal, diabetes, use of immunosuppressant drugs)
  • 8. Treatment  Intravenous antibiotics  Cortisone like medications (more recent)  Doctor may also treat for  Brain swelling  Shock  Convulsions  Dehydration  Surgery (to drain fluid between the skull and meninges or infections)
  • 9. Prevention  Wash your hands  Stay healthy  Cover your mouth  Take care with food if you are pregnant  Immunizations

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