Team 11 presentation

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Team 11 presentation

  1. 1. THE PENTAGRAM MODELAn innovative route to sustainability from Coxswain Consulting, LLC Anup Rao Divyansh Agarwal Eric Parrie TEAM #11 Sabyasachi Chatterjee Shashi Bhushan Sinha
  2. 2. STATUS QUO: A BROKEN CYCLE Issues Ideas Impact Politics Mining as % of RSA GDPOutcomes Policies 30 21 20 1970 10 6 2012 People Programs 0 2
  3. 3. THEORY OF CHANGEIssues Ideas Impact INCENTIVES INNOVATION IMPLEMENTATION DATA REPORTING ACCOUNTABILITY SAFETY STABILITY PRODUCTIVITY 3
  4. 4. PUBLIC INNOVATIONSIssues Ideas Impact Sustainable On-site Health Mining Centers Institute POLICIES Data Sustainability Collection & Bonus Publication Race to the Top 4
  5. 5. ON-SITE HEALTH CENTERS Issues Ideas Impact• Gradual build to 368 centers COST ESTIMATE nationwide • INITIAL: $100 M • RECURRING: $500M• Deliver preventive care and treatment services to miners and RATIONALE • Preventive care will improve health , their families increase productivity, and reduce long- term costs• Low cost drugs for DR-TB using • Health centers will supplement data collection and transfer Social Impact Bond• Report data instantly to Ministries RISK of Health and Mining • Volatile drug prices balloon costs HEALTH 5
  6. 6. SEE & SOLVE DATA SYSTEM Issues Ideas Impact COST ESTIMATE• Creates transparency for accidents, • INITIAL: $300 M miner health, and environmental • RECURRING: $100 M impact• Enables identification of best and RATIONALE • Must have means to track performance worst practices • Changes culture within mining firms• Worker health data is lacking in • Builds process knowledge within mines and across the industry (ALCOA) current system RISK • Agencies may lack data analysis expertise • Difficult to setup. HEALTH 6
  7. 7. RACE TO THE TOP Issues Ideas Impact• Companies compete for COST ESTIMATE annual grants awarded for • STARTUP: $1 B development of best • RECURRING: $100M / year practices RATIONALE • Pushes firms to innovate • Leverages expertise within firms, preventing inefficient regulation • Ensures that best practices becomePRIZE SCALE standard practices RISK • Implementing best practices may be complicated in absence of statute • Financial incentive may not be strong enough for MNCs HEALTH 7
  8. 8. SUSTAINABILITY BONUS PROGRAM Issues Ideas Impact• Firms that achieve COST ESTIMATE sustainability benchmarks • STARTUP: $100 M • RECURRING: $100M / year receive a financial award from the state RATIONALE• Ex: Hazard Mitigation • Pushes firms to innovate – Installation of UV lamps • Leverages expertise within firms, preventing inefficient regulation – Stronger infrastructure to prevent floor fall accidents – Accident rates in lowest RISK quintile • Demand could outstrip supply HEALTH 8
  9. 9. INSTITUTE of SUSTAINABLE MINING Issues Ideas Impact• Supports public health and COST ESTIMATE mining science research • STARTUP: $300 M • RECURRING: $100 M / year• Draws talented practitioners from around RATIONALE the world • Current schools are dedicated to engineering not sustainability• Develops the next generation of miners and RISK officials from RSA • Language diversity complicates instruction • Traveling to the institute could be cost- prohibitive for low-income students HEALTH 9
  10. 10. BUDGET Issues Ideas Impact FY 13 FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22RTTT 1000 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100ISM 300 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100Bonus 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100Data 300 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100OSHC 100 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500TOTAL 1800 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 All amounts listed in USD (millions) 10
  11. 11. PROJECTED IMPACTON-SITE HEALTH SUSTAINABILITY BONUS PROGRAM RACE TO THE TOP CENTERS INSTITUTE of SEE & SOLVE DATA SUSTAINABLE SYSTEM MINING Better Infrastructure and expanded expertise Improved Increased living and MNC working investments conditions Heightened Labor Productivity 11
  12. 12. THANK YOU 12
  13. 13. APPENDICES• MHSC Award Scheme• Budget: Indian School of Mining• Summary Table of the types of mining injury• Social Impact Bonds• Budget: Moradabad TB center• ALCOA incident reporting system• Effectiveness of ALCOA system• Precious Persons Pension Plan• Occupational lung disease in the South African mining industry: Research and policy implementation• References 13
  14. 14. A: CURRENT MHSC AWARD SCHEME (1)The Mine Health and Safety Council Award Scheme is governed by a set of rules. A mine wishingto participate in the awards scheme administered by the Inspectorate must comply with thefollowing rules:• It must be registered as a mine with the Directorate: Mineral Economics of the Department ofMineral Resources;• It must be in continuous operation for the qualifying period;• Qualifying shifts commence from the date of registration with the Mine Health and SafetyInspectorate;• The manager must define the participating entity and this participating entity must beregistered with the Mine Health and Safety Inspectorate;• A monthly report of labour and shifts must be submitted to the Department of MineralResources for each participating entity within the registered mine;• The size of the participating entity will be limited (where possible) to a size where theparticipating entity will take approximately six months or more to qualify for one million fatalityfree shifts;• Participating entities will be allowed to take part in one or more of the categories of the schemewith the following exception: a participating entity may take part in either the Millionaire Awardor the Thousand Fatality-Free Production Shifts Award, but not both.• The participating entity must be described on the registration form. The form must besubmitted before a participating entity will be allowed to participate in the awards scheme.• Should a participant withdraw from an awards scheme, it may rejoin provided it complies with the rules. 14
  15. 15. B: CURRENT MHSC AWARD SCHEME (2)• The Millionaires Award category recognizes the milestone of achieving one million (1,000,000) fatality-free shifts on any mine. To be eligible to enter, a mine, or a portion thereof, must be in continuous operation and form a participating entity as defined by the manager.• • The Thousand Fatality-Free Production Shifts Award category recognizes the milestone of achieving one thousand (1,000) fatality-free production shifts on any mine. To be eligible for this award, a mine, or a portion thereof, must be operational and form a participating entity as defined by the manager.• • The Safety Achievement Flag is awarded to the mines that have the highest improvement in their allocated risk (days lost when comparing two consecutive three-year periods, the same periods that is used to calculate the Safety in Mines Research Advisory Committee Levy). The categories are pided into:• • Ultra-deep (deeper than 2,000m) gold and platinum mines;• • Shallow to deep (less than 2,000m) gold and platinum mines;• • Coal mines; and• • Other mines.• • Inpidual awards are presented to any inpidual, or a group of inpiduals (such as a mine rescue team or a mine safety committee) that has contributed to the overall health and safety programme of a mine in a manner that has led to a significant improvement in conditions at that mine may be nominated by the mines manager or the employee representatives for an Inpidual Award. The Mine Health and Safety Council will assess the nomination and determine whether or not such a nomination is warranted. Any specific acts of bravery will also be considered for this award. 15
  16. 16. C: BUDGET: INDIAN SCHOOL OF MINING 16
  17. 17. D: MINING INJURY TYPES 2010-2011 17
  18. 18. E: SOCIAL IMPACT BONDS 18
  19. 19. F: BUDGET: MORADABAD TB CONTROL CENTER SOURCE: http://care.prajnopaya.org/index.php/prajnopaya-foundation/162-moradabadold 19
  20. 20. G: COST ESTIMATION of UV GERMICIDAL TECHNOLOGYCost of 10 16mW UV germicidal 25$Area occupied by the mining 87,600km2lamp at 254nmindustries and workersCost of scaling the germicidal 920,000$lamps to all the residing areas ofmine workers Data based on Mineral Commodity Summaries Report, see references 20
  21. 21. H: RESEARCH SUPPORTING CONTROLLED USE of UV TECHNOLOGY Bhattacharya et al, 2001 21
  22. 22. I: ALCOA SEE & SOLVE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM 22
  23. 23. J: EFFECTIVENESS of ALCOA SEE & SOLVE SYSTEM 23
  24. 24. K: OCCUPATIONAL LUNG DISEASE in THE MINING INDUSTRY: RESEARCH Study Context Date Outcome Steen et 304 former gold 1994 Very few miners with occupational lung disease al miners living in had been compensated (proportion not specified) Thamanga, Botswana Trapido 238 former gold 1996 62% of those eligible not compensated. Only et al miners living in 2.5% fully compensated Eastern Cape, South Africa Murray All 2530 miners who 1999 19% cases had occupational lung disease not et al came to autopsy identified and submitted for compensation in life, or more severe disease than had been compensated in life. Roberts 205 former miners, 2008 85% reported not receiving the statutory medical et al Eastern Cape, South examination when leaving the mine (which is Africa partly to identify compensable disease). 203/205 (99%) did not know of the Compensation Act and its benefits Maiphetl 84 former mine 1993- 17/84 (20%) recorded as having received ho et al workers diagnosed 2005 compensation. Median time from submission of with silicosis at medical records to receipt of award was 51 Groote Schuur months (range 22–84 months) Hospital, Cape Town, and submitted for compensation 24
  25. 25. L: OCCUPATIONAL LUNG DISEASE in THE MINING INDUSTRY: POLICY 25
  26. 26. REFERENCES• Chamber of Mines of South Africa. “Facts & Figures 2010.” Chamber of Mines of South Africa Publications. 2011.• South African Legislature. “Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act.” Publications of South African Legislature. 1973• State President’s Office. “Occupational Disease in Mines and Works Amendment Act, 1993.” Publications of State President’s Office. January 1994.• Alvarez-Rivera, Manuel. “Republic of South Africa General Elections Results Lookup (1994).” Election Resources on the Internet. September 2010.• McClenaghan, Maeve. “South African Massacre Was the Tip of an Iceberg.” Bureau of Investigative Journalism. 18 October 2012.• Steen, Gyi, White, et al. “Prevalence of occupational lung disease among Botswana men formerly employed in the South African mining industry.” Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 54:19-26. 1997. 26
  27. 27. • Trapido, Mqoqi, Williams, et al. “Prevalence of occupational lung disease in a random sample of former mineworkers, Libode District, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa.” American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 34:305-313. 1998.• Girdler-Brown, White, et al. “The burden of silicosis, pulmonary tuberculosis and COPD among former Basotho goldminers.” Aurum Institute for Health Research. 2008.• Park, Girdler-Brown, Churchyard, et al. “Incidence of tuberculosis and HIV and progression of silicosis and lung function impairment among former Basatho gold miners.” American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 52:901-908 (2009).• Girdler-Brown, et al. 2008.• Corbett, Charalambous, et al. “Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the Prevalence of Undiagnosed Tuberculosis in African Gold Miners”. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 170. 2004.• Corno and de Walque. “Mines, Migration and HIV/AIDS in Southern Africa.” Journal of African Economies. 21:3. 2012.• Garzarelli, Giampaolo, Lyndal Keeton-Stolk, and Volker Schoer. “Workers’ Compensation in the Republic of South Africa.” 19 Mar. 2008.• “http://www.westerncape.gov.za/Text/2004/5/theminingcharter.pdf.” 2004. 27
  28. 28. • Murray, Jill, Tony Davies, and David Rees. “Occupational Lung Disease in the South African Mining Industry: Research and Policy Implementation.” Journal of Public Health Policy 32 (2011): S65– S79. Web. 4 Nov. 2012.• Sonjica, Buyelwa. "Keynote Address." 5th Mine Health and Safety Council Summit. Department of Minerals and Energy. Johannesburg. 5 Oct. 2007.• “Broad-Based Socio-Economic Empowerment Charter for the South African Mining Industry.” http://www.westerncape.gov.za/Text/2004/5/theminingcharter.pd f. 2004.• “South Africa’s New Mining Charter.” SouthAfrica.info 14 Sept. 2010. Minerals, South Africa Dept of, and Energy. Housing and Living Conditions Standard for the South African Minerals Industry. Government Printer, 2009.• “Mining Health and Safety in South Africa.” The African Business Journal.• PAUL, AK, “Enhanced UV Sensitivity of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans Resulting from Caffeine and Acriflavine Treatment of Irradiated Cells”. Current Microbiology Vol. 43 (2001), pp. 149–153 28
  29. 29. • Hargy, T.M., J.L. Clancy, and Z. Bukhari. “Shedding UV Light on the Cryptosporidium Threat.” In NSF Proceedings of the Small Drinking Water and Wastewater Systems. International Symposium and Technology Expo: Phoenix, Arizona. 2000• Malley, J.P., G.A. Snicer, and A.M. Doucette. “Alternative Disinfection Strategies for• Small Systems.” In Small Systems Water Treatment Technologies: State of the Art• Workshop. NEWWA Joint Regional Operations Conference and Exhibition: Marlborough, Massachusetts. 1998.• Parrotta, M.J. and F. Bekdash. “UV Disinfection of Small Groundwater Supplies.” Journal of the American Water Works Association. AWWA: Denver. 1998.• U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1996.• Ultraviolet Light Disinfection Technology in Drinking Water Application—An Overview. Office of Water: Washington, D.C. EPA/ 811-R-96-002. 29
  30. 30. • Hargy, T.M., J.L. Clancy, and Z. Bukhari. “Shedding UV Light on the Cryptosporidium Threat.” In NSF Proceedings of the Small Drinking Water and Wastewater Systems. International Symposium and Technology Expo: Phoenix, Arizona. 2000• Malley, J.P., G.A. Snicer, and A.M. Doucette. “Alternative Disinfection Strategies for Small Systems.” In Small Systems Water Treatment Technologies: State of the Art Workshop. NEWWA Joint Regional Operations Conference and Exhibition: Marlborough, Massachusetts. 1998.• Parrotta, M.J. and F. Bekdash. “UV Disinfection of Small Groundwater Supplies.” Journal of the American Water Works Association. AWWA: Denver. 1998.• Mineral Commodity Summaries Report. http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/gold/mcs- 2008-gold.pdf. 2009• U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Ultraviolet Light Disinfection Technology in Drinking Water Application—An Overview. Office of Water: Washington, D.C. EPA/ 811-R-96-002. 1996. 30

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