Crisis Information Management

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Very brief overview of Crisis Information Management - new tools, products and techniques

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Crisis Information Management

  1. 1. Crisis Information Management Sanjana Hattotuwa Special Advisor, ICT4Peace Foundation
  2. 2. First
citizen
journalist? •  Abraham
Zapruder
 •  Bell
&
Howell
camera
 •  Less
than
30
seconds
 •  Sold
to
Life
Magazine
for
US$
 150,000
3
days
later

  3. 3. London
Bombings
 •  7
July
2005
(7/7)
 •  Within
24
hours,
the
 BBC
had
received
 1,000
stills
and
 videos,
3,000
texts
 and
20,000
e‐mails.


  4. 4. UN
CIM
Stocktaking
Process •  Crisis
Information
Management
capabilities
 and
capacities
in
the
UN
Secretariat,
NY
and
 key
UN
agencies
 •  Stocktaking
conducted
over
2008
with
 DPKO,
DSS,
UNICEF,
various
arms
of
the
 UNDP,
OCHA

  5. 5. Key
aindings •  Intra
agency
“point
solutions”
that
have
emerged
in
response
to
 particular
events
or
needs
 •  Many
of
these
solutions
have
produced
excellent
results
and
 could
be
leveraged
across
the
UN
system
in
times
of
crisis.

 •  However,
at
present
many
tools,
solutions
and
processes
remain
 unknown
and
isolated
from
one
another.
 •  Sustainability
of
point
solutions?
 •  Agency
learning
/
wider
institutional
learning
of
point
 solutions?

  6. 6. Key
aindings •  Staff
transience
 •  Interoperability
non‐existent
or
poor
within
 and
between
agencies
learning
to
 information
silos,
data
loss,
duplication
etc
 •  Poor
policies
and
practices
information
 management

  7. 7. Key
aindings •  Inward
looking
–
beneaiciaries
and
public
are
 outside,
untrustworthy
 •  New
media
and
ICTs
were
often
seen
as
 bandwidth
hogs
and
serious
security
threats
 •  Parallel
communications
–
UN
mandated
/
 needs
driven
responses
by
staff
 •  Infrastructure
issues
at
the
UN
Secretariat


  8. 8. Key
aindings •  No
vital
records
archival
programme
across
 the
institution.
Data
integrity
and
long‐term
 storage
was
left
up
to
individual
agencies.
 •  Agency
led
categorisation
of
information
did
 not
sometimes
makes
sense
to
other
actors
 •  Information
overload
 •  Senior
management
not
interested

  9. 9. Crisis Information Management Systems: New directions, old challenges?
  10. 10. 8
ICTs
for
shared
situational
 awareness 1.  Twitter
(micro‐blogging)
(e.g.
http://spy.appspot.com)
 2.  RSS
(e.g.
Google
News
Reader)
 3.  Wiki
(e.g.
CCCPA
wiki)
 4.  Mobiles
(SMS)
 5.  GPS
(real
time
location
data)
 6.  Mapping
(GIS
–
Google
Maps
/
Google
Earth)
 7.  VoIP
(e.g.
Skype)
 8.  Social
networking

  11. 11. Information
breakdown
 • Twitter
 • Flickr
 New
media
 • Blogs
 • SMS
/
MMS
/
Mobiles
 • Social
networks
 Mainstream
 • CNN
/
BBC
/
Al
Jazeera
 • Local
/
National
TV
and
radio
 • Print
media
(mainstream
/
 media
 regional)
 • Alternative
print
media
 UN
 • Sit
reps
 • Humanitarian
Information
Centres
 intelligence
 • Agency
databases
/
email
lists
 • Personal
contacts
/
relationships

  12. 12. Google
Earth
|
Crisis
in
Darfur

  13. 13. Easy
to
use
GPS
  14. 14. Twitter 
 http://www.twitter.com •  First
reports
of
Chinese
earthquake
in
May
 2008
were
from
Twitter
 •  Mexico
City
earthquake
in
2007
 •  Minneapolis
Bridge
collapse
in
2007

  15. 15. Mumbai
bomb
blasts
 26th
and
27th
November
2008

  16. 16. Spy
 
 http://spy.appspot.com
  17. 17. Flickr
|
Vinu
 
 http://www.alickr.com/photos/vinu/sets/ 72157610144709049/
  18. 18. Wikipedia
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ 
 26_November_2008_Mumbai_attacks
  19. 19. Wikipedia
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ 26_November_2008_Mumbai_attacks •  400+
edits
/
 updates
 •  100+
 authors
 •  Less
than
24
 hours
after
 airst
attack

  20. 20. Social
Networking
  21. 21. “Revolution
Facebook
Style” 
 New
York
Times,
22nd
January
2009 •  In
most
countries
in
the
Arab
world,
Facebook
is
 now
one
of
the
10
most‐visited
Web
sites,
and
in
 Egypt
it
ranks
third,
after
Google
and
Yahoo.

 •  About
one
in
nine
Egyptians
has
Internet
access,
and
 around
9
percent
of
that
group
are
on
Facebook
—
a
 total
of
almost
800,000
members.
 •  April
6
Youth
Movement,
a
group
of
70,000
mostly
 young
and
educated
Egyptians,
most
of
whom
had
 never
been
involved
with
politics
before
joining
the
 group.

  22. 22. Gaza
aid •  The
Australian
senate
has
approved
$10
million
USD
 aid
to
the
Palestinian
people
in
the
Gaza
Strip.
 Stimulated
by
a
group
of
activists
on
Facebook
who
 called
themselves
quot;The
Pro­Palestinian
Lobby
on
 Facebook.quot;
 •  The
group,
which
was
formed
shortly
after
the
war
 on
Gaza
started,
consists
of
a
number
of
networks
 that
together
amount
to
nearly
one
million
people,
 including
Palestinians,
and
internationals
from
 different
parts
of
the
world.


  23. 23. Broadcasting
|
Ustream.tv
  24. 24. Bambuser 
 
 http://bambuser.com/
  25. 25. Some
key
differences 
 •  Systems
within
UN
 •  Systems
outside
UN  •  Agency
focused
and
 •  Crowd
sourced
 agency
owned
 information
/
outward
in
 •  Inward
looking
 •  Veriaiability
optional
and
 •  Generally
veriaied
/
 hard
 agency
produced
or
 •  Designed
for
scalability
 trusted
source
 •  Open
source
/
Open
data
 •  Set
up
for
dissemination
 standards
 •  Proprietary
data
formats
 •  Potential
of
 and
systems
 interoperability
high
/
 •  Little
or
no
 Information
exchanged
 interoperability
 poor
 •  Hard
to
learn
 •  Easy
to
learn


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