Malthus' theory of population growth
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  • 1. WHAT IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FOOD PRODUCTION AND POPULATION GROWTH?
  • 2. Share of Global Population per Continent, 1700-2000 100% 80% Oceania Asia Middle East CIS Africa Europe Latin America North America 60% 40% 20% 19 80 19 40 19 00 18 60 18 20 17 80 17 40 17 00 0%
  • 3.
  • 4. Malthus’ Theory of Population Growth    In 1798 Thomas Malthus published his views on the effect of population on food supply. His theory has two basic principles: Population grows at a geometric rate i.e. 1, 2, 4, 16, 32, etc. Food production increases at an arithmetic rate i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. Thomas Malthus
  • 5. Malthus (cont.)   The consequence of these two principles is that eventually, population will exceed the capacity of agriculture to support the new population numbers. Population would rise until a limit to growth was reached. Further growth would be limited when: • Negative checks - postponement of marriage (lowering of fertility rate), abstinence, increased cost of food etc. • Positive checks - famine, war, disease, would increase the death rate. Malthusian ideas are often supported by Western governments because it highlights the problem of too many mouths to feed, rather than the uneven distribution of resources.
  • 6. Do you agree with Malthus’ observations?
  • 7. Instructions   Is the Malthusian Theory relevant today? Refer to your handouts. Use Paul’s Wheel of Reasoning to build your argument. As you present your arguments, the listening groups will use the Ladder of Feedback to give your response.