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A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
A different way to divide
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A different way to divide

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Rebuilding division

Rebuilding division

Published in: Education
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  • 1. A way to divide numbers that doesn’t require structure David Coulson, 2014
  • 2. Nobody ever uses it after they leave primary school. It’s a procedure that people hardly ever need to use, and when they do need to use it, they can’t remember it. Catch-22. Remember this thing?
  • 3. Nobody ever uses it after they leave primary school. It’s a procedure that people hardly ever need to use, and when they do need to use it, they can’t remember it. Catch-22. It’s also a procedure that requires strict adherence to structure: you have to make sure numbers go in the right places, which means good handwriting. Remember this thing?
  • 4. Nobody ever uses it after they leave primary school. It’s a procedure that people hardly ever need to use, and when they do need to use it, they can’t remember it. Catch-22. It’s also a procedure that requires strict adherence to structure: you have to make sure numbers go in the right places, which means good handwriting. This procedure is quickly going the way of the dinosaur. There are more intuitive methods for simple calculations that don’t require precise positioning of sub- totals. Remember this thing?
  • 5. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 6. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 7. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 8. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 9. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 10. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 11. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 12. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 13. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 14. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 15. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 16. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 17. Here’s an alternative that doesn’t require such finicky writing.
  • 18. David Coulson, 2014 dtcoulson@gmail.com The point is to make arithmetic operations intuitive again without compromising speed. That classic method that we all learned at school was invented a century ago for grown- up accountants and engineers who had no electronic alternatives for crunching numbers. Teaching it at school was a sideline. It was never designed for kids. Now even the little kids have calculators. So if they are ever going to learn paper-and-pen methods for crunching numbers, the procedures have to be easy, fast and intuitive. Otherwise all we’re doing is keeping their minds busy until they leave school.

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