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Storage Component Technologies in the Age of Big Data and Cloud Computing - Steve Hwang
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Storage Component Technologies in the Age of Big Data and Cloud Computing - Steve Hwang

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Steve Hwang, VP of Seagate, gave the talk at CAISS Annual Conference 2012, as part of the panel discussion: Storage Component Technologies - Enable Big Data and Make Better Cloud Computing.

Steve Hwang, VP of Seagate, gave the talk at CAISS Annual Conference 2012, as part of the panel discussion: Storage Component Technologies - Enable Big Data and Make Better Cloud Computing.


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  • 1. October 6, 2012Storage Component Technologies in the Age ofBig Data and Cloud ComputingCAISS Annual Conference 2012Dr. Steve Hwang, Vice President Media R&DSeagate Technology, RMO Fremont Steve.Hwang@Seagate.com
  • 2. Key Factors in the HDD Market The New Commodity – Big Data & Cloud Computing Digital Content Explosion HDD Road Map – HAMR & BPM 210/06/2012 CAISS
  • 3. New Commodity- Data is the New Oil "Just as the politics of oil shaped the 20th century industrial economy, so the politics of data will shape the 21st century digital economy… data is the new oil, the vital fuel of our digital economy,“ Andrew Keen, CNN, Jan 27, 2012 Driven by 2 major trends • Big Data • gathered, e.g., by social networks, online commerce, … • used to analyze and shape consumer buying trends, marketing strategies, medical trends, financial services, social studies, … • Cloud Computing • similar in concept to mainframe and client- server computing of yore • permanent accessibility from vast number of smart mobile devices 310/06/2012 CAISS Source: Seagate Market & Competitive Intelligence
  • 4. The Ever Expanding Growth of Information How Much Information? 2009 Report on American Consumers 32GBs passes the human eye every day 18 GB of Games 12 GB of Video 3 GB of Movies Sponsors: Source: How Much Information? 2009 UCSD 410/06/2012 CAISS
  • 5. Total Industry Petabytes Shipped Thousands of Petabytes 400 350 300 Exabyte growth is 40% per year…how to meet that 250 demand? 200 150 100 50 - CY04 CY07 CY00 CY01 CY02 CY03 CY05 CY06 CY08 CY09 CY10 CY11 Enterprise Consumer Electronics Mobile PC Deskbased PC Retail Source: Seagate Market & Competitive Intelligence 510/06/2012 CAISS
  • 6. Areal Density Growth Trends During the last 10 years the number of drives shipped increased from 200 million to 600 million, this is a 3x increase in shipped drives During the same period, the average capacity of the drive has increase from 17 GB to 565 GB, a 32.5x increase. With the average number of heads per drive increasing from 2.5 to 3.5, the average areal density of the drives increased by just over 23x (or about 35%/year) during the last ten years Historically we have used areal density growth and not more heads and media or more drives to satisfy Exabyte growth, but the existing PMR technology is approaching its limits 610/06/2012 CAISS
  • 7. Why can’t we just build more drives? Assuming areal density does not increase and the number of heads per drive remains fixed (in other words, just build more drives) we would need to expand capacity at 40% per year. Adding that kind of capacity would cost a company like Seagate billions of dollars annually But it would also mean that Dell, Google, Microsoft, etc., would need to build a new data center every two years at a cost of $300 million per data center. In addition, these companies would have to maintain their data centers which means that their ongoing cost of operations, e.g., power consumption, would also be growing at 40% per year. Seagate Factory in Thailand Facebook alone spent $606 million in 2011 on their data centers. These added costs will get passed on to consumers in the form of higher costs Economically, our customers need us to increase areal density to keep costs for storage under control and that is why we need HAMR (or any other technology that allows us to continue AD growth)! ! Facebook Data Center in Oregon 710/06/2012 CAISS
  • 8. Approaches for high density HAMR – Head Assisted Magnetic Recording Magnetic recording Increase Ku Ku • V BPM – Bit Patterned Media Media SNR Increase V Thermal Writability Stability 810/06/2012 CAISS
  • 9. Why HAMR? HAMR vs PMR Media Loops 1.5 HAMR Media PMR Media 1.0 Increase make smaller 0.5 Areal Density Mperp/MS grain stable 0.0 -0.5increase density by increasing >1Tbpsi anisotropy -1.0by smaller grains -1.5 -60 -40 -20 0 20 40 60 Field (kOe) heat media to write need localized heat source (<50nm) integrated head with near field transducer 9 10/06/2012 CAISS
  • 10. Seagate HAMR 1TB Announcement 1010/06/2012 CAISS
  • 11. A HAMR Drive To the right is a photo of an actual HAMR drive. You can tell it is a HAMR drive because it has the laser warning sticker stuck on the front Below is a picture of an integrated HAMR head including the laser (not the same head used in the drive) Seagate CEO Steve Luczo gave a presentation to Wall Street analysts using a fully functional HAMR drive on Sept. 21, 2012. Slider Laser 1110/06/2012 CAISS
  • 12. BPM Process Flow New Building Blocks: MTR, NIL & PFP IMPRIO HD 2200 Kitting NIL Polymerized Imprint Fluid LIM* Post Sputter Wash Wash Sputter Prime Disk Imprint Pattern Lube Formation MTR Buff UV PFP Glide Cert MDW Aperio 1210/06/2012 CAISS
  • 13. To Reach the Unreachable Peaks … PS-b-PEO 10.5 T/in2 4 T/in2 2 T/in2 (1 µm x 1 µm) 1310/06/2012 CAISS
  • 14. Conclusion The customer base of the storage industry is rapidly changing, and we need to change accordingly We need capacity and areal density growth to keep up in an economical way with the rapid growth of storage demand We need HAMR (or any other technology that allows us to continue AD growth)! HAMR is for real in Seagate’s view is the next HDD technology By building HAMR drives you gain unique insights into HAMR that can not be foreseen by spin stands alone Although read back is largely unaffected by HAMR, major portions of the drive architecture need to be re-designed to accommodate HAMR 1410/06/2012 CAISS