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Innovative problem
      solving guide
                 By Sunit Shrestha
          & Sailendra Dev Appanah




          ...
“Imagination is more important than knowledge.
Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”

                  ...
Case of social innovation: Green-revolution




       Professor M.S. Swaminathan triggered a green revolution by
       i...
Case of social innovation: Rural electricity




      Fabio Rosa has helped millions of rural Brazilians to have access
 ...
Case of social innovation:
   Quality volunteer matching




3 young MBA graduates founded MITRA‟s iVolunteer project acts...
Case of social innovation:
  Meal coupons against poverty.




MealExchange was conceived by a young college student to fi...
How to innovatively solve a problem?

Social entrepreneurs make the world a better place with their social innovations or ...
THE PROCESS
Innovative problem solving is a process that is part of innovating solution stage of social enterprising.

The...
FRAMING
         Framing or defining is all about trying our best to ask the right question in
         solving the proble...
FRAMING
                 To answer what is the problem,
                 we should focus on the 3 generic elements of the ...
FRAMING

A proper frame can give you a clear sense of purpose.

Problem solving is always about moving from Initial situat...
FRAMING
    Example: The fishing village

  CONTEXT: Fishing villages of rural India in poverty. They
  are using traditio...
FRAMING
DEVELOPING PROBLEM DEFINITION

Using the context and the difference between Initial situation
and Goal situation, ...
FRAMING


          DEVELOPING PROBLEM DEFINITION

          Example               context
          Traditional fishermen...
FRAMING
FRAME TESTING & RESTATEMENT

Once we have our problem definition, we ask;

Did we frame it properly?

Which can br...
FRAMING

FRAME TESTING AND RESTATEMENT

                                                         Too broad?
Example

Tradi...
FRAMING


FRAME TESTING AND RESTATEMENT

Restatement example                          Fixed!
Traditional fishermen in rura...
FRAMING
        “The ability to ask the right question is more
        than half the battle of finding the answer.”
      ...
FRAMING
Key question making.

Example,

PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Traditional fishermen in rural India don‟t have access to accur...
DIAGNOSIS
        Diagnosing is about structuring the problem to know its causes
        and gains deep understanding to r...
DIAGNOSIS
              Diagnosis process:

              Gathering      Bridging          Forming
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DIAGNOSIS
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DIAGNOSIS
    Summarizing diagnosis process
             In summary, the DIAGNOSIS process consists of ……………..


         ...
GENERATING SOLUTIONS

     Generating solutions process is all about finding various
     ways to remove the causes of the...
GENERATING SOLUTIONS

Is the problem a routine/standard, unique or combination of both?

By answer whether the problem is ...
GENERATING SOLUTIONS


   Can we solve it intuitively right away? (top-down)

   Once you identif y the problem type, you ...
GENERATING SOLUTIONS


macroSOLUTION


                                 Can we solve parts of the problem and aggregate th...
GENERATING SOLUTIONS

                    c
                                      d
A set of solutions
                   ...
MAKING CHOICES

 Learning how to make the right choices is all about selecting the proper solution
 to solve the problem. ...
MAKING CHOICES
 1          2
                               1. List all the Pros
                               First, we ...
MAKING CHOICES


PROs Cons                                      4. Neutralize as many Cons as possible

                  ...
MAKING CHOICES
             Solution C


             PROs    Cons

                                       High risk prior...
TAKING ACTION

          Taking action is all about transforming your innovation solution
          into reality. It is ab...
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Innovative Problem Solving Guide

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Don't start anything without first using this guide. It helps you unravel a truly unique and innovative solution to tackle a problem so that you ensure that your solution or company is bullet-proof against competitors.

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    Send by my E-Mail ID : rafeeqahmedali@gmail.com or mansoorelahee@rediffmail.com

    I have 500 GBs hard disk but that is read / write very slow moving coping etc in thsi bad sector is their witout any damage data how to remove bad sector i trid error and fixing option in propreity checkdisk. tell me soon any body please
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Transcript of "Innovative Problem Solving Guide"

  1. 1. Innovative problem solving guide By Sunit Shrestha & Sailendra Dev Appanah www.ysei.org
  2. 2. “Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.” Albert Einstein www.ysei.org
  3. 3. Case of social innovation: Green-revolution Professor M.S. Swaminathan triggered a green revolution by introducing higher yielding wheat that allowed India to avoid a famine 40 years ago. In just a few decades, India has become a net-exporter of food. www.ysei.org
  4. 4. Case of social innovation: Rural electricity Fabio Rosa has helped millions of rural Brazilians to have access to low-cost electricity that is 90% cheaper than the traditional electricity transmission cost. www.ysei.org
  5. 5. Case of social innovation: Quality volunteer matching 3 young MBA graduates founded MITRA‟s iVolunteer project acts as an online brokerage which brings thousands of highly talented volunteers to bridge the human capacity gap amongst non -profit organizations in India. www.ysei.org
  6. 6. Case of social innovation: Meal coupons against poverty. MealExchange was conceived by a young college student to fight hunger in Canada. He created a system where unused students‟ meal coupons could be converted into food and groceries for the underprivileged. www.ysei.org
  7. 7. How to innovatively solve a problem? Social entrepreneurs make the world a better place with their social innovations or their new way of solving social problems. There are three key components in the social enterprise process: innovating solutions, planning and organizing. Social enterprise process Innovating Planning Organizing Solution However, innovating solutions, especially in bridging creative ideas into reality, is an irreplaceable task of social entrepreneurs as other processes such as planning and organizing can be left partly for managers and team members. So, generating innovative ideas to solve the problem is your unique task; although there is no one right way to solve any particular problem. However, there is a more systematic way to think of how to solve the problem innovatively. That’s why innovative problem solving is important to you! www.ysei.org
  8. 8. THE PROCESS Innovative problem solving is a process that is part of innovating solution stage of social enterprising. The innovative problem solving process has five sub-stages: framing, diagnosis, generating solutions, making choices and taking action. Social enterprise process Innovating Planning Organizing Solution Innovating solution: Innovative problem solving process Generating Making Taking Framing Diagnosis solutions choices action www.ysei.org
  9. 9. FRAMING Framing or defining is all about trying our best to ask the right question in solving the problem. In framing, we should answer 3 questions Can we restate the problem Did we frame it properly? What is the problem? in its most useful way? Framing help us lock our target problem well with clarity. Remember, Voltaire said “Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers.” www.ysei.org
  10. 10. FRAMING To answer what is the problem, we should focus on the 3 generic elements of the any problem. 1 CONTEXT: Background and disruptive events leading to the problem. 3 2 Context GOAL SITUATION: INITIAL SITUATION: The desirable The current condition Initial Goal results/conditions if you are not satisfied the problem is solved. situation Situation with. Where do you want to Where you are now? end up? www.ysei.org
  11. 11. FRAMING A proper frame can give you a clear sense of purpose. Problem solving is always about moving from Initial situation to Goal situation. Context Initial Goal solution situation Situation www.ysei.org
  12. 12. FRAMING Example: The fishing village CONTEXT: Fishing villages of rural India in poverty. They are using traditional fishery techniques. People die at sea and get cheated by middle men for centuries. Initial Goal situation Situation No access to accurate Villagers should be able to information on weather, access the latest and most sea conditions and food accurate information on solution prices results in death weather forecasts, sea at sea & being cheated conditions and food prices on sales of fish. so that they can catch more with safety & sell at higher price. www.ysei.org
  13. 13. FRAMING DEVELOPING PROBLEM DEFINITION Using the context and the difference between Initial situation and Goal situation, we can define the problem more clearly. Make sure your problem definition reflects your initial/goal situation as well as the context. Problem definition Context Initial Goal solution situation Situation www.ysei.org
  14. 14. FRAMING DEVELOPING PROBLEM DEFINITION Example context Traditional fishermen in rural India don‟t know when or where to fish as well as the right price to sell the fish they catch, so they risk their lives and get cheated by the middlemen. Therefore, they can‟t fish safely or sell at higher price. INITIAL GOAL www.ysei.org
  15. 15. FRAMING FRAME TESTING & RESTATEMENT Once we have our problem definition, we ask; Did we frame it properly? Which can break down into follow sub-questions… Is the problem definition…. too broad? too narrow? assumption-driven? solution-driven? If YES, we ask; Can we restate the problem in its most useful way? www.ysei.org
  16. 16. FRAMING FRAME TESTING AND RESTATEMENT Too broad? Example Traditional fishermen in rural India don‟t know when or where to fish as well as the right price to sell the fish they catch, so they risk their lives and get cheated by the middlemen. Therefore, they can‟t fish safely or sell at higher price. Comment! This can be a bit too broad as the word „don‟t know‟ can be very broad. For example, we can narrow down to the problem of access of information rather than the skills‟ needed to come up with the information by themselves. As both are different ways to solve the same problem. www.ysei.org
  17. 17. FRAMING FRAME TESTING AND RESTATEMENT Restatement example Fixed! Traditional fishermen in rural India don‟t have access to accurate information on weather and prices to so they risk their lives and get cheated by the middlemen. Therefore, they can‟t fish safely or sell at higher price. www.ysei.org
  18. 18. FRAMING “The ability to ask the right question is more than half the battle of finding the answer.” Thomas J. Watson, founder of IBM KEY QUESTION MAKING Once you have the most useful problem statement, you transform it into key question to be answered to solve the problem. PROBLEM STATEMENT KEY QUESTION www.ysei.org
  19. 19. FRAMING Key question making. Example, PROBLEM STATEMENT: Traditional fishermen in rural India don‟t have access to accurate information on weather and prices to so they risk their lives and get cheated by the middlemen. Therefore, they can‟t fish safely or sell at higher price. KEY QUESTION: How can traditional fishermen in rural India gain access to accurate information on weather and prices so they can fish safely and increase their sell price ? As framing is all about asking the right question, and now we‟ve got ourselves something that might be the right question. So, we’ve framed the problem! www.ysei.org
  20. 20. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosing is about structuring the problem to know its causes and gains deep understanding to remove them. Diagnosis process in innovative problem solving includes: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Information Although these components in diagnosis process need not be in linear order. However, it is recommended to walk-through these components consecutively as it is more logical to do so although you can jump back and forth depending on your unique situation. www.ysei.org
  21. 21. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation GATHERING RELEVENT INFORMATION What information do we need to solve the problem? We should gather information related to the problem such as facts, perceptions, opinions, feelings and analysis. Many times it is very important to know where to get specific pieces of information as different type of information are from different sources. Analysis & news can be searched from the Internet but deep insight on particular issue might be better sought from expert directly. There are two things to keep in mind: A) Don’t waste time finding information you don’t really need. Ask “Do we have just about enough information to start solving the problem?” B) Information alone is not enough to innovatively solve the problem. This is very true as „innovation = new‟ and we are not looking for routine solution, therefore, existing information and knowledge only provide ground work for us to innovate. www.ysei.org
  22. 22. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation BRIDGING MULTI- DIMENSIONALITY It is proven again and again that innovations, whether in science, nature, business or social sector, are driven by multi-dimensionality which is the ability to explore different sides of things as well as the intersection of diverse ideas, perceptions, incentives and world-views. It is in this chaotic potential that novelty emerges. We can start by asking three basic key questions; What are the different sides/faces to the problem? Who are the stakeholders involved and what are their perspectives to this problem? Do you need to redefine your problem based on multi -dimensionality? www.ysei.org
  23. 23. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation What are different sides to the problem? We need to look at the different sides of the problem to extend our limited perspective on it. Multi -dimensionality helps us to get ideas, innovations or models from diverse fields and cultures to perform a diagnosis and generate possible solutions. There are almost infinite sides to a single problem, of which only very few are useful angles to look at. Jay Walker, one of the most famous contemporary inventors, said “If you can’t find at least six sides to a problem, you’re not looking hard enough.” We can look at different approaches to think about the problem, We should be able to choose a few sides that are Macro Other useful to solve the problem. The key is to be able view views recognize and gather totally random knowledge (it Gender Owner‟s could be either from rock music, insect behavior, rocket Artist view view science or business practices) to purposefully combine view Religious them into innovative solutions. The intersection of User‟s view Management various disciplines, view-points, expertise and passion View Marxian Scientist view systems view is among the root causes for innovation. view view Capitalism view Psychological Complexity view view www.ysei.org
  24. 24. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Who are the stakeholders involved and what are their perspectives to this problem? Getting to know the people involved with the problem can enhance our ability to understand the context and relationships that cause the problem. We need to know exactly who is related to the problem, both directly and indirectly. We must know their perspectives, incentives, profit/loss, and conflicts of interests to the problem. For example Pollution caused by Criminal activity is a automobiles is terrible problem that among the top society faces, but the contributors of global insurance industry warming, yet the benefits from it. petroleum industry reaps huge profits. It is impossible to solve these types of problems without understanding the stakeholders well ! www.ysei.org
  25. 25. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Do you need to redefine your problem based on multi-dimensionality? Based on the inclusion of dimensionality into the understanding of a problem, it might make sense to redefine the problem and go back to ask the previous question: Can we restate the problem in its most useful way? For example www.ysei.org
  26. 26. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation FORMING COMPETENT TEAM As we mentioned before, innovation comes from the intersection of diversity, therefore, bringing in people from different fields to cross the traditional boundaries of the problem is very important. Forming of competent team of passionate diverse individuals is critical for innovatively solving the well-defined problem. In this process we need to ask two main questions: Who can really contribute to solving the problem innovatively? Who among them should become part of the core group, mentors or advisors? www.ysei.org
  27. 27. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Who can really contribute in solving the problem innovatively? In finding who can really contribute, we must try to identify the knowledge, skills and networks required to solve the particular problem. We might not know exactly who, but we should know people from which discipline, organization or group is needed. We know this from our multi-dimensionality workout, especially in terms of useful perspectives/dimensions. Then we can follow-up and identify the people later. www.ysei.org
  28. 28. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Who among them should be part of the core group, mentor or advisor? mentor Core-group Once the individuals have been identified, we should plan the type of roles that these people could play within the group. Should the person should be in the core group, advisory group, become a mentor or a distant source depending on the requirement of knowledge, skills and time availability as well as the interest of that particular person in solving the problem. Confusing or inappropriate roles can result in a total failure in the problem solving process. advisor www.ysei.org
  29. 29. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation STRUCTURING How do you structure this problem? Structuring is all about bringing order out of chaos. It helps us visualize the systems that deliver the problem situation. In order to deal with huge amounts of data, information and knowledge, we must impose logical order to these seemingly chaotic elements of the problem to make some sense of them. There is a very useful structuring technique that is widely used, especially among consulting firms where problem solving is a profession for them. The technique involves developing a logical pyramid or in simpler words: grouping your points/issues/ideas into a pyramid-like structure. www.ysei.org
  30. 30. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation GROUPING FOR PYRAMID! There are 3 possible ways to logically structure any system of a problems; > Determine the causes of an effect. > Classify similar things. > Divide a whole into its parts. www.ysei.org
  31. 31. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation GROUPING! Determine the causes of an effect / TIME-ORDER . Death at sea & Effect Being cheated Cause 1 Cause 2 Cause 3 Economic No price No weather necessity of information information fishermen www.ysei.org
  32. 32. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation GROUPING! Classifying similar things / CATEGORY ORDER Fishermen village‟s All problems problems The rest of the Problems relates to Problems Problems Other problems access to accurate category 1 category n problems (tradition, information capacity, etc..) www.ysei.org
  33. 33. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation GROUPING! Systems Divide a whole into its parts / STRUCTURAL ORDER Sub-system1 Sub-system 2 Sub-system 3 Weather information systems Free Internet Traditional Geographic inf ormation National authority system –GIS GIS images techniques www.ysei.org
  34. 34. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation RULES IN STRUCTURING A PYRAMID There are three basic rules in building the pyramid • Ideas at any level must be summaries of those grouped below. • Ideas in each grouping must be the same kind. • Ideas in each grouping must be logically structured. • Ideas at each level must be Mutually Exclusive and Collectively Exhaustive (MECE) IF NOT, you will end up with a bigger mess than you start out trying to make some sense out of the problem! www.ysei.org
  35. 35. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Pyramid helps bring insights When you‟ve structured the problems in pyramid format from various dimensions. You practically have forced yourself to think very logically about different elements of the problems using visual technique. You always end up with better understanding on the problem, you‟ve gained insights. EXAMPLE, Some key insights from the fishermen village problem. - We can try to deal with price and weather information in our attempt to solve the problem rather than changing the traditional job of the village. - Access to information seems to be a good category of problem‟ elements to work on compare to the rest of element categories. - Source on weather information that might be the most accurate and useful to the community might be the from the Internet GIS images. www.ysei.org
  36. 36. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation RECOGNIZING PATTERNS Once you have a fairly clear idea of how to structure the problem. It is very useful to try to fit the problem into familiar patterns or boxes of known problems. You see, although each problem is unique, there is a similarity to other known problems. The advantage of recognizing patterns is that there might already be some people who are dealing with or have dealt with a very similar problem and its analysis or solution might be applicable to our problem. www.ysei.org
  37. 37. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation New problem RECOGNIZING PATTERNS (Cont.) The recognition of patterns is the corner stone of inventiveness. It is true that innovators think outside the box, but before they do that, they tend to think inside the box first. The patterns or boxes are like a stock of known analyses or solutions which innovators can draw upon to address problems. The trick is to spot something that already works, learn why it works and then reapply or complete the model to our problem situation. Pattern is all about finding the similarity of what is known that can be applied to the unknown to solve the problem. Universe of known problems/solutions www.ysei.org
  38. 38. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Application of boxes to new problem. PROBLEM BOXES The application of known boxes to solving problems involve: 1. Complete application of a particular box to the problem; it might be a routine problem or a problem that can be restated as a variation of other known problems. 2. Extend the known model to solve the new problem; it is the problem that has part of its elements that can fit a known pattern, thus, providing a basis to solve the problem. 3. Combination of many boxes, many problems are a combination of many known patterns. Thus one must apply many boxes to solve the problem which either can be applied completely or require an extension. www.ysei.org
  39. 39. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Application of boxes to new problem. PROBLEM BOXES Example 1. Complete application of a particular box to the problem; MICROCREDIT – access to cheap credit f or poor f amilies by making community groups accountable f or def ault on loans. Popularized by Grameen Bank and spread through out the world where rural credit is a problem. 2. Extend the known model to solve the new problem; Vera Cordeiro’s Renascer – solves chronic diseases and repeated visits to the hospital f rom slum children by helping their mothers with f ood, medicine, counseling, housing repair, job training and other types of assistance. Although she is using conventional medical method but the service is extended with social dimensions so that it is more ef f ective in solving the problem. 3. Combination of many boxes, Rural fishermen knowledge (ICT) center – MSSRF in India use digital satellite GIS image, trained local interpreter and community loud-speaker to provide the villagers with accurate weather information and forecast to reduce death at sea and increase their productivity. Therefore, they combine known boxes of GIS systems and traditional village communication resulting in unique social innovation. www.ysei.org
  40. 40. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Issue analysis Hypothesis Once you‟ve identified some boxes of known problems/solutions related to what your problems‟ structure and elements. You might already have a better idea how to analyze the problem further in order to find a way to solve your problem. Whether you‟ve precisely or intuitively identify how to solve your problem, issue Issue 1 Issue 2 Issue (n) analysis will be very useful. Issue analysis is a process of identifying major issues that are the causes of the problem. It is the ultimate version of structuring. It helps narrow and pinpoint the real causes of the problem as well as helping you to make a creative leap in solving it. Sub- Sub- The issue analysis process involves: Issue a Issue b • Structuring the problem and developing logical pyramid • Hypothesizing and issue pyramid • Hypothesis testing www.ysei.org
  41. 41. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Issue analysis Problem (effect) Structuring the problem and develop logical pyramid Structuring process is identical to that discussed previously. It basically imposes logical order to the elements of the problems. Cause 2 Cause 1 Cause (n) Again, there are three type of logical ordering, time-order, category-order and structural order. We must choose the most appropriate order to solve the problem. Sub- Sub- In problem solving, the most useful order is the time-order cause a cause b (causes and effect) as we are trying to understand the causes in order to remove them. Other orders are good as tools for thinking in arriving at the right time-order logical pyramid. www.ysei.org
  42. 42. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Issue analysis Example: Rural fishing village experiences death at sea and being cheated by the middlemen THE FISHING VILLAGE PROBLEM’S LOGICAL PYRAMID They need to continue their risky and worst-off day-to-day They lack Information access to work in order to continuously feed their poor family relevant and accurate information They lack price They lack weather They follows They are too poor They can‟t easily information which which put them in traditional job of to take risk of leads to getting switch to other danger at sea. their village due having no family occupations. cheated by the to social value. income & food. middlemen www.ysei.org
  43. 43. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Issue analysis Problem (effect) Hypothesizing and issue pyramid Once the basic structure of the problem is visible, we must hypothesize the major causes of the problem based on our earlier structure. Cause 2 Cause (n) Cause 1 We can even choose some particular main causes of the problem from the logical pyramid that seems to be the most useful in solving the problem. Sub- Sub- Issue a Issue b The general format of a hypothesis or argument is as follows; The major causes of problem x ( moving from INITIAL to GOAL ) are CAUSE1, CAUSE2 and CAUSE3, (cause_n) www.ysei.org
  44. 44. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Issue analysis Hypothesizing and issue pyramid (Continue) Hypothesis Then we structure the problem into the issue pyramid based on the importance of major causes with respect to how you plan to solve it. Where a logical pyramid is simply a structured grouping of problem‟s elements, issue pyramid is the series of questions or issues that must be addressed to prove or disprove a hypothesis about the root causes of the problem. At the top level is the hypothesis of what are the most important causes of the Issue 1 Issue 2 Issue (n) problem that if removed, the problem is solved. The upper level represents causes or issues that can be proven as true or f alse once we test them against the data. (That is, we can convert these issues into clear-cut yes or no questions.) The statements or arguments in the lower level of the pyramid provide support f or the upper level. Each level of the pyramid must provide strong reasoning so Sub- Sub- that each cause is truly a major cause of the problem. Issue a Issue b The supportive reasoning is done either through deductive or inductive reasoning, although inductive reasoning is recommended as it is easier to establish a relationship. (link to more on deduction/induction) www.ysei.org
  45. 45. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Issue analysis Example: Rural fishing village experiences death at sea and being cheated by the middlemen THE FISHING VILLAGE PROBLEM’S LOGICAL PYRAMID They need to continue their risky and worst-off day-to-day They lack Information access to work in order to continuously feed their poor family relevant and accurate information TIPS: In choosing where to begin making the hypothesis about the They lack price They lack weather root causes of the problem. We can try to find some causes that if information which which put them in removed, are sufficient to solve the problem (i.e. find sufficient leads to getting danger at sea. condition that kills the problem). cheated by the middlemen In this case, lack of information access can be sufficient condition that if removed, can already solve the problem. So we can only work with this issue to solve the problem already. www.ysei.org
  46. 46. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Issue HYPOTHESIS: Rural fishermen lack Information access to relevant and accurate information so they die at sea and analysis get cheated by the middlemen Example: ISSUE: They lack weather ISSUE: They lack price & market THE FISHING VILLAGE information which put them information which leads to PROBLEM’S in danger at sea. getting cheated by the middlemen ISSUE PYRAMID SUB-ISSUE: SUB-ISSUE: SUB-ISSUE: SUB-ISSUE: They lack They can‟t find They can‟t find They lack knowledge to accessible, accessible, knowledge to read and timely and timely and communicate communicate accurate accurate the prices & the weather information information market information forecast source. source to their peers. (especially GIS). www.ysei.org
  47. 47. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Issue analysis HYPOTHESIS: Can we reduce rural fishermen‟s death at sea and CONVERT TO QUESTION cheating by middlemen with access to relevant and accurate information? FORMAT OF ISSUE PYRAMID ISSUE: Can the weather ISSUE: Can the price & market information reduce their information reduce their chance of yes/no questions danger at sea? getting cheated by the middlemen? Example: THE FISHING VILLAGE PROBLEM’S SUB-ISSUE: SUB-ISSUE: SUB-ISSUE: SUB-ISSUE: ISSUE PYRAMID Is there a Is there an Is there an Is there a knowledge to accessible, accessible, knowledge to read and timely and timely and communicate communicate accurate accurate the prices & Support the weather information information market information inf ormation / forecast for them? reasoning source for them? source for them? to their peers? (especially GIS). www.ysei.org
  48. 48. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Issue analysis TESTED! Hypothesis Hypothesis testing Once the hypothesis pyramid in setup, we can now test our True reasoning by gathering more relevant data or information to prove induction each of the issue and its supportive statements in that particular level of the pyramid. At the end of the testing, we must be able to prove our hypothesis Issue 1 Issue 2 Issue (n) as a sound argument (i.e. with logical strength and true supportive TRUE FALSE TRUE statement/premises). Once the testing is done, it might be useful to restate the hypothesis/argument so that it fits more with reality. It is important to note that most of the real world problems are not black or white. Sub- Sub- Issue a Issue b Thus, issue analysis simply provides stronger logical setup for our problem analysis to pinpoint the major causes of the problem that TRUE TRUE effectively give us a better chance to come-up with proper solutions. www.ysei.org
  49. 49. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis process: Gathering Bridging Forming Recognizing issue Structuring Relevant multi- competent patterns analysis dimensionality team Inf ormation Issue analysis HYPOTHESIS: Can we reduce rural fishermen‟s death at sea and cheating by middlemen with access to relevant and accurate information? HYPOTHESIS TESTING YES NOTE: In many case, especially in using inductive reasoning, not all issues/sub- ISSUE: Can the weather ISSUE: Can the price & market issues have to be true to make the information reduce their information reduce their chance of hypothesis true as it might only need one danger at sea? YES getting cheated by the middlemen? YES suf f icient issue to make it true! Example: THE FISHING VILLAGE PROBLEM’S SUB-ISSUE: SUB-ISSUE: ISSUE PYRAMID TEST SUB-ISSUE: SUB-ISSUE: Is there an Is there a Is there a Is there an accessible, knowledge to knowledge to accessible, timely and communicate TESTING PROCESS: read and timely and accurate the prices & You always have to begin testing f rom accurate communicate down to up, your task is to f ind the information market information the weather information answer all these key issues/sub-issues source for them? to their peers? whether they‟re true or credible. forecast for them? source for them? YES YES YES (especially GIS). YES www.ysei.org
  50. 50. DIAGNOSIS Summarizing diagnosis process In summary, the DIAGNOSIS process consists of …………….. gathering related information, understanding the multi-dimensionality (different sides) of the problem, forming a competent team of individuals from diverse areas/disciplines to contribute to the innovative problem solving process, structuring the problem through imposing a logical order to elements of the problem, recognizing patterns or boxes of known problems/analyses/solutions to reapply to our particular problem. Performing issue analysis allows innovative solutions to remove the pinpointed root causes of the problem. www.ysei.org
  51. 51. GENERATING SOLUTIONS Generating solutions process is all about finding various ways to remove the causes of the problem, thus, effectively solving it. The earlier processes of innovative problem solving, whether framing or diagnosis, are just preparations for the stage of generating solutions to the original problem. It is at this process where the intuition is the most crucial. We might have creative leap in seeing solution without going through all the earlier processes. The process consists of answering the following questions; • Is the problem a routine/standard, unique or the combination of both? • Can we solve it intuitively right away? (top -down) • Can we solve parts of the problem and aggregate them? (bottom-up) • What are the solutions? www.ysei.org
  52. 52. GENERATING SOLUTIONS Is the problem a routine/standard, unique or combination of both? By answer whether the problem is a routine/standard, unique or the combination of both, it is very usef ul in f inding where th e solutions would come f rom. If the problem is a routine/standard type, we can identify the boxes of known problems and apply its solutions to our problem directly. The generation of solutions f or this type would concentrate on f inding existing knowledge-base on how to solve a problem. It is more important to know where to f ind the relevant knowledge-base than to come up with your original solution which might very well run the risk of reinvent the wheel. If the problem is indeed a unique type , it is more important to focus on how to creatively solve the problem in an original way. The f ocus would shif t to creative techniques such as brain-storming, visualization, backward induction, lateral thinking. The preparation works such as f raming, problems structure, issue analysis are important ingredients to make creative leap in solving problem. It is crucial that one must not kill the possible solutions f rom birth, i.e. in throwing ideas to the table on how to solve the problem, one must delay the evaluation of particular idea until each idea is develop into a well-thought-of solution or its element. If the problem is a combination of both, it is important to identif y which part of the problem is routine/standard and which is not. Those that are routine can be solved using a boxes technique and those that are unique elements must be solved creativelyใ www.ysei.org
  53. 53. GENERATING SOLUTIONS Can we solve it intuitively right away? (top-down) Once you identif y the problem type, you can now use various outputs f rom your f raming and diagnosis process to assist you in arriving at the solution. If some case, especially when the problem is not complex or your intuition perf orm miracle, you can solve it right away once you know the real causes to the problem. If you answer yes to the top-down question. That would mean you intuitively grasp the solution to the problem as a whole. Most of the time, it‟s because you could see the pattern that the problem is a generic one that can apply other known generic solutions to it. You might also f ind proper analogy that transf orm solution f rom one area to your target problem‟s area. You could easily search the boxes f or solutions. On a rare occasion, your intuition work out magic. You might very well develop original solution to the problem intuitively. The remaining work is to provide details in solving various parts of the problem. Theref ore, it is called top -down approach. www.ysei.org
  54. 54. GENERATING SOLUTIONS macroSOLUTION Can we solve parts of the problem and aggregate them? (bottom-up) Most of the cases, especially in complex problems, it is dif ficult to solve the overall problem right away. The advantage of painf ul problem structuring and issue pyramid is that they provide a very clear pyramid structure to the problem. Theref ore, as we break the problem down to sub-issues/problems, it is easier for us to solve smaller problems and slowly aggregate them into the original problem. We use the same technique in solving smaller problems, i.e. see which is routine and which is unique and solve them accordingly. It is very crucial to check whether the smaller solutions integrate back to ef f ectively solve the original problem as many times it doesn‟t quite sum up or there can be unnecessary repetition in the set of solutions. microSOLUTIONS www.ysei.org
  55. 55. GENERATING SOLUTIONS c d A set of solutions What are the solutions? b Once we have some ideas of alternative solutions to the problem. We must develop them in such a way that they become clearer both in term of concept and the A process. Each solution should contain a clear process or steps in solving the problem, the resources required, assumptions and the output/outcome of the solution as well as other unique aspects of the solutions such as the degree of acceptability by the stakeholders and the practicality of the Developed solutions. “Solution A” process resources assumptions output/outcome acceptability other aspects… practicality www.ysei.org
  56. 56. MAKING CHOICES Learning how to make the right choices is all about selecting the proper solution to solve the problem. It consists of f inding the best-fitting solution f or solving the problem. In doing so, we must compare each solution against the other. Then, we can select the one that yields the best combination of benef its and risks. Former CIA analyst, Morgan D. Jones has developed a choice-making technique that has been proven to be very usef ul in making the best choices between various alternatives. The technique is called “Pros-Cons-Fixes (PCF)”. PCF‟s advantage over other Pros-Cons analysis is that it f ocuses on eliminating unnecessary & biased negativity in human reasoning. The PCF process consists of the f ollowing steps: • List all the Pros. • List all the Cons. • Review and consolidate the Cons f or merging and elimination. • Neutralize as many Cons as possible. • Compare the Pros and unalterable Cons against all options, pick one option at a time. www.ysei.org
  57. 57. MAKING CHOICES 1 2 1. List all the Pros First, we try to list the Pros of a particular solution in as many varied dimensions as possible: benefits, PROs Cons advantages, merit, strength, practicality, acceptability, cost-effectiveness, innovativeness, scalability, sustainability, etc. 2. List all the Cons pros1 We then list all the Cons in as many varied cons1 dimensions as possible, especially in terms of risk, pros2 danger, disadvantage, weakness, threat, cons2 unacceptability, cost, etc. pros3 cons3 3. Review and consolidate the Cons for merging 3 and elimination Consolidate We try to rethink about the Cons; try to group and cons4 the cons consolidate them, find their common attributes and eliminate those that are not relevant. cons5 www.ysei.org
  58. 58. MAKING CHOICES PROs Cons 4. Neutralize as many Cons as possible Frequently, the reason many Cons arise is because the solutions remain simply too new and have never really been thought-through bef ore. Theref ore, spotting the Cons in each solution can actually help modif y and improve that particular solution. Fixable by doing “X” pros1 cons1 By neutralizing as many Cons as possible, we are able to think of what can be done or what measure can be taken, to either convert pros2 each Con into a Pro or to neutralize the various Cons. cons2 Next to the Cons that are f ixable, we should write down the types of Fixable by pros3 preventing “Y” ways we would like f ix them. The Cons that can be f ixed do not truly cons3 represent Cons f or a new solution as they can already be prevented. We would be lef t with the Cons that are unf ixable or unalterable, Cons4,5 which truly represent the Cons of that particular solution. consolidated www.ysei.org
  59. 59. MAKING CHOICES Solution C PROs Cons High risk priority! pros1 Compare the Pros and unalterable Cons against all cons1 options; pick one option at a time pros2 cons2 Solution B pros3 Beneficial Once the Pros and unalterable Cons f or all options are visible, we priority should compare them against one another and pick the one that best Cons4,5 f its our pref erence the most. Even with the clearest outline for all the PROs Cons solutions in terms of Pros and Cons in various dimensions, it is not going to be easy to compare them. pros1 We should instead prioritize which Pros or Cons by attaching higher or lower weights depending on their importance in our pros2 decision making process. Generally, benefits and risks are key cons2 determinants. pros3 PROs Cons However, if we are looking f or new ways of solving problems, we might have to give innovativeness a higher priority over other pros. Key beneficial priority If we are looking f or unique solutions, we might instead be willing to pros1 take on unacceptability so that the solution that we are lef t with is so pros2 new that it might break status quo. cons2 pros3 BEST CHOICE! Solution A: Cons3 www.ysei.org
  60. 60. TAKING ACTION Taking action is all about transforming your innovation solution into reality. It is about realising your creative solution. For young social entrepreneurs, this would mean turning the solution into a clear plan and organizing f or lasting change. It is this process where real changes are made and the world could be transf ormed by the solution/social innovation. This concludes our process of innovative problem solving or innovating solutions. We are now ready to continue to the next process of … • Planning • Organizing Continue to “Social Enterprise Plan” guide www.ysei.org
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