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IRISH CULTURE
 

IRISH CULTURE

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IRISH CULTURE POWER POINT

IRISH CULTURE POWER POINT

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    IRISH CULTURE IRISH CULTURE Presentation Transcript

    • •LONDON•DUBLINCELINAS CITY•LIMERICK
    • THE BRITISH ISLESThe British Isles are a group of islands off thenorthwest coast of continental Europe thatinclude the islands of Great Britain, Ireland andover six thousand smaller isles.Two sovereign states are located on the islands:The Republic of Ireland and the UnitedKingdom of Great Britain and NorthernIreland.The British Isles also include threedependencies of the British Crown: the Isle ofMan and, by tradition, the Bailiwick of Jerseyand the Bailiwick of Guernsey in the ChannelIslands.
    • THE IRISH FLAGThe national flag of Ireland (Irish: bratachna hÉireann) is a vertical tricolour ofgreen, white and orange.The Irish government has described thesymbolism behind each colour as being thatof green representing the Gaelic traditionof Ireland, orange representing thefollowers of William of Orange in Ireland,and white representing the aspiration forpeace between them.
    • IRISHFOOD
    • SHAMROCKCUPCAKES
    • CELTIC SPIRALS
    • SHAMROCK SUGARCOOKIES
    • PEANUT BUTTERMICE
    • IRISH BREAKFAST
    • FULL BREAKFASTA full breakfast is a substantial breakfast meal,usually consisting of bacon, sausages and eggs,often served with a variety of side dishes and abeverage such as coffee or tea. It is especiallypopular in the UK and Ireland.The phrase "full breakfast" is used todifferentiate it from the European continentalbreakfast traditionally consisting of tea, milkor coffee and fruit juices with croissants orpastries.Many British and Irish cafés and pubs serve themeal at any time as an "all-day breakfast".
    • GUINNESS
    • GUINNESGuinness is a popular Irish dry stout thatoriginated in the brewery of Arthur Guinness(1725–1803) at St. Jamess Gate, Dublin.Guinness is one of the most successful beerbrands worldwide. It is brewed in almost 60countries and is available in over 100. 850million litre are sold annually.The draught beers thick, creamy head comesfrom mixing the beer with nitrogen whenpoured. It is popular with Irish people both inIreland and abroad, and, in spite of a decline inconsumption since 2001, is still the best-sellingalcoholic drink in Ireland where Guinness &Co. makes almost €2 billion annually.
    • TEA AND SCONES
    • TEA & SCONES• It is well known the strong relationshipthat English people have with the tea.• Tea & scones is a little pleasure thatEnglish and Irish people usually havebetween the lunch and the dinner time.• Some time around 3 or 4 in the afternoonthey have a break and a little pick-me-upto get some energy till night time.
    • SHAMROCKCELTIC SPIRALTRINITYKNOTCLADDAGH
    • •The shamrock refers to the young sprigsof clover or trefoil.• It is known as a symbol of Ireland, with Trinity,according to legend.• The name shamrock is derived from Irishseamróg, which is the diminutive version of theIrish word for clover (seamair) meaningsimply "little clover" or "young clover".•The trinity knot is a symbol that has beenused by Christians as a sign of the BlessedTrinity (Father, Son and Holy Spirit), especiallysince the Celtic Revival of the 19th century.• When modern designers began to display thetriquetra as a stand-alone design, it recalled thethree-leafed shamrock which was similarlyoffered as a Trinity symbol by Saint Patrick.
    • •The Claddagh ring (Irish: fáinneChladaigh) is a traditional Irish ring givenwhich represents love, loyalty and friendship(hands represent friendship, heart representslove, crown represents loyalty).• The design and customs associated with itoriginated in the Irish fishing village ofCladdagh, located just outside the old citywalls of Galway, now part of Galway City.The ring as we know it was first produced inthe 17th century.•The triple spiral or triskele is a Celticand pre-Celtic symbol found on a numberofIrishMegalithic and Neolithic sites, mostnotably inside the Newgrange passage tomb.
    • CELTIC HARPCELTIC CROSS
    • •The celtic cross (Irish: cros Cheilteach) isa symbol that combines a cross with a ringsurrounding the intersection. It belongs to a kindof crosses with a nimbus.• In the Celtic Christian world it was combinedwith the Christian cross and became popular forfunerary monuments and other uses, and hasremained so, spreading well beyond Ireland.•Cláirseach is the generic Gaelic word for aharp, as derived from Middle Irish.• In English, the word is used to refer specificallyto a variety of small Irish and Scottish harps.• Three medieval Gaelic harps survived into themodern period, two from Scotland (the QueenMary Harp and the Lamont Harp) and one inIreland (the Trinity College harp, sometimesromantically called the Brian Boru harp)
    • HURLING
    • • Hurling (Irish: Iománaíocht/Iomáint) is anoutdoor team game of ancient Gaelicorigin,administered by the Gaelic Athletic Association.The game hasprehistoric origins, has been playedfor over 3,000 years,and is thought to be theworlds fastest field team game in terms of gameplay.• There is a similar game for women called camogie.It shares a common Gaelic root with the sportof shinty which is played predominantly inScotland.• The object of the game is for players to use awooden stick called a hurley to hit a small ballcalled a sliotar between the opponents goalpostseither over the crossbar for one point, or underthe crossbar into a net.• The sliotar can be caught in the hand and carriedfor not more than four steps, struck in the air, orstruck on the ground with the hurley. It can bekicked or slapped with an open hand for short-range passing.
    • ENGLISH / GAELIC•Ball /Liathróid•Apple / Úll•Book /Leabhar•Teacher / Múinteor
    • ENGLISH / GAELIC•Hello! / Dia Duit•Good bye! / Slán•Thanks! / Go raibhmílemaith agat.•School / Scoil