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Misconception or fact
 

which is which?

which is which?

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    Misconception or fact Misconception or fact Presentation Transcript

    • Misconception
      or
      Fact
      This presentation considers some of the specific roles of women described in the Bible, along with some of the more apparent attitudes held about them.
      Do note that the Bible is the only book in the world up to our century which looks at women as human beings, no better and no worse than men.
      HERE ARE THE 7 LADIES I SELECTED.
    •  Tempted by Satan        
      Eve was the first woman on earth, the first wife, and the first mother. She is known as the "Mother of All the Living." 
      She was the only woman without a mother and a father. She was made by God as a reflection of his image to be a helper to Adam. Together they would fulfill God's purpose of populating the Earth.
      Eve was tempted by Satan when he got her to doubt God's goodness, by focusing on the one thing she couldn't have. She failed to consult either one of them when confronted with Satan's suggestions. She acted impulsively, independent of her authority. Later on she invited Adam to join her.
       
      The image of Eve as temptress in the Bible has resulted in an extremely negative impact on women throughout the Judeo-Christian tradition. All women were believed to have inherited from their mother, the Biblical Eve, both her guilt and her guile. Consequently, they were all untrustworthy, morally inferior, and wicked.
      Eve
    • How far should a woman go?          
      Tamar was Judah's daughter-in-law, the widow of his two elder sons. Both her husbands 'spilt their seed', practicing a form of birth control, so Tamar was childless - a terrible fate for a Jewish woman. 
      To change her fortune she demanded her right to marry her deceased husband's brother, in this case Judah's youngest son Shelah.
      But Judah fobbed her off, and eventually she decided her only option was to trick him. She disguised herself as a prostitute, took up a position at the side of the road , and solicited him when he passed. Recently widowed, Judah was happy to comply, and Tamar conceived.
      When the time of her delivery came, there were twins in her womb. She gave them the names of Perez and Zerah.
      Tamar
      Tamar covers her face, a custom followed by prostitutes at the time, but leaves her leg and breast bare.
      So have any of you ladies ever tried to trap a man only to remain single mothers?
    •  Her sexual success lied in her skill at creating an 'expectation of delight' 
      There have always been self-possessed sirens that have mastered the art of seduction. But contrary to popular belief, physical beauty was only one of the lures they used to their gain. By relying on their gifts of wit, brains, empathy and self-sufficiency, showing only glimpses of flesh, perfecting their makeup and adorning themselves with sumptuous fashions, they would tease a man’s imagination and stimulate his desire for something greater than sex: the chance to possess a fantasy figure. This was Salome.
      Salome
      Since appearing in the bible, Salome has appeared many times as a master seducer in literature and art. Oscar Wilde wrote a one-act play about her to shock audiences with its spectacle of perverse passions and Strauss created a one-act opera about her in 1905.  In most depictions Salome is portrayed as a seductress and a murderer of a saint, thereby becoming a symbol of the erotic and dangerous woman, the femme fatale.
      The most obvious origin is the Biblical story which tells of Salome’s dance to please her uncle Herod and her demand, incited by her mother, for John the Baptist’s head.
    •  Saddled with a reputation as the bad girl of the Bible
      This ancient queen has been denounced as a murderer, prostitute and enemy of God, and her name has been adopted for lingerie lines and World War II missiles alike. But just how depraved was Jezebel?
       When Jezebel enters the scene in the ninth century B.C., she provides a perfect opportunity for the Bible writer to teach a moral lesson about the evil outcomes of idolatry, for she is a foreign idol worshiper who seems to be the power behind her husband.
      Jezebel
      Jezebel, the queen whose name became synonymous with all things lewd and wicked, probably wielded a fair bit of power in ancient Israel. Unlike the many voiceless biblical wives and concubines whose muteness reminds us of the powerlessness of women in ancient Israel, Jezebel has a tongue. While her verbal acuity shows that she is more daring, clever and independent than most women of her time, her withering words also demonstrate her sinfulness. Jezebel transforms the precious instrument of language into an evil device to blaspheme God and defy the prophet.
      Jezebel was ultimately perceived as a threat and foreign idol worshipper, accused of prostitution, murder and sorcery, and tossed from her window to be ravaged by dogs.
    •  KING IN SEX ROMP WITH NAKED WOMAN!          
      Now for those of you who are offended by classical artistic nudity, I’d like to ask… What do you think King David saw? Look at her…
      Bathsheba was seen by King David as she bathed in full view of the palace. Subsequently she became pregnant to him. As David wanted her all to himself he murdered her husband Uriah. Both repented and God forgave them.
      Bathsheba then married the King. Her baby died. She had a second son, who was called Solomon who eventually became king, one the most famous of Jewish Kings.
      By marrying King David she became the most powerful woman during the period of the monarchy. After his death she occupied the most prestigious position a woman could hold, Queen Mother. 
      Bathsheba
      So for all of you women out there who have committed adultery and believe that nothing could can come from your lives, just remember the story of David & Bathsheba.
    •  A never married woman who was not a virgin…
      Rahab was a Canaanite, an ancient body of pagans that inhabited Palestine at the time Israel entered the land in the 15th century before Christ. They were a grossly wicked people, steeped in idolatry and immorality. They even sacrificed their children on occasion as offerings to their gods. By profession, Rahab was a “harlot,” and the scriptures make no attempt to hide that unsavory lifestyle. Without question, this woman needed considerable refinement. However she had come to believe in the true God and his power to deliver. She was of a different temperament than her heathen neighbors.
      Rahab lived in Jericho  in the Promised Land . She is known to have assisted the Israelites in capturing the city. For this gesture, she and her family, were promised that once the city was taken they would all be spared. All she had to do was to mark her house by hanging a red cloth out the window. Some have claimed that the symbol of the red cord is the origin of the ‘red light district’.
      Later on she married Salmon of the tribe of Judah and was the mother of Boaz.
      Rahab
      No matter your stand in life, irrespective of where you are or who you are, a simply step of faith in Jesus Christ can turn your destiny around.
    •  Genuine love at times may require uncompromising sacrifice.
      This story of love and devotion tells of Ruth's eventual marriage to a wealthy man named Boaz, by whom she bears a son, Obed, who becomes the grandfather of David and the ancestor of Jesus. Obedience brings Ruth into the privileged lineage of Christ.
      Ruth tells her mother-in-law of Boaz's kindness, and she gleans in his field through the remainder of the harvest season. Boaz is obliged by the Levirate law to marry Ruth in order to carry on his family line.
      Ruth followed a carefully scripted multi –faceted plan to catch the rich Boaz. She was sent to the threshing floor at night and was told to "uncover the feet" of the sleeping Boaz. Ruth does so; Boaz awakes and asks, "Who are you?" Ruth identifies herself. She was a beautiful girl and a delight to his ever watchful eyes. She then asks Boaz to spread his cloak over her. The phrase "spread your cloak" was a woman's way of asking for marriage. For a man to spread his cloak over a woman showed acquisition of that woman. Boaz states he is willing to "redeem" Ruth via marriage, but informs Ruth that there is another male relative who has the first right of redemption. This was later relinquished by the relative.
      Ruth
      So I guess we can say she married ‘for money’ while others would say, she was a ‘gold digger’ or married a ‘sugar- daddy’.
    •  This presentation took a lot of my time in research, but felt it was necessary for me to share with you the right text pertaining to each woman listed.
      I can truthfully tell that these writings of mine came about by ‘inspiration’ and not ‘perspiration’.