HFC Architecture In The Making
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HFC Architecture In The Making

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Joint presentation about the mFN technology and HFC architecture evolution. NCTA Cable Show, 1999

Joint presentation about the mFN technology and HFC architecture evolution. NCTA Cable Show, 1999

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    HFC Architecture In The Making HFC Architecture In The Making Presentation Transcript

    • HFC Architecture In The Making Oleh Sniezko, Tony Werner, Doug Combs and Esteban Sandino AT&T Broadband & Internet Services Xiaolin Lu, Ted Darcie, Alan Gnauck, Sheryl Woodward Bhavesh Desai and Xiaoxin Qiu AT&T Labs Rob Mclaughlin AT&T Broadband Services EngineeringXL 6/11/99
    • What is this?  The first joint presentation (AT& Labs and AT&T Broadband – former TCI) on NCTA Cable Show 1999  The invention and evolution of the mini Fiber Node (mFN – Lightwire and later OXiom) technology  At that time an extensive field trial was going on in Salt Lake City  And why we do thisXL 6/11/99
    • ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Adel Saleh ABIS ABSE (former A-Laber) Patrick O’Hare Mark Dzuban Larry Cox Cameron Gough Tim Peters Marty Davidson Sam Barney Bill Scheffler Quasar, Inc Bogdan LomnickiXL 6/11/99
    • HFC IN THE MAKING SH FN Primary SH Hub FN SH  Segmentation  FSS  DWDM  Node Splitting  DWDM  SONET  Ring-In-Ring  BDR DOCSIS ModemXL 6/11/99
    • CHALLENGES  Bandwidth Demands  Take rate and multiple lines  New services (streaming)  User behavior (always-on, SOHO)  Operation Savings Network  Sweep Evolution  Maintenance  Powering  Performance  Reliability  QoSXL 6/11/99
    • ARCHITECTURES Tree-and-Branch  Broadcast FN  Cascaded ??? Cell-Based  Narrowcast RN  ClusteredXL 6/11/99
    • FIBER OPTICS ? Node 2,000+HP 1,200HP 600HP 200HP 100HP Size HOW Deep ? HOW To ?XL 6/11/99
    • Initial Mini-Fiber Node Architecture Mini- FN HE mFN mFN Local Signaling for MAC New Services Analog video 5 50 550 1G  Fiber to mFN For Digital Overlay  550/750 - 1000 MHz Two-Way per 50 HHPs Two-  Low-Power- Low-Power-Consumption Digital Path  Simple Protocol and TerminalsXL 6/11/99
    • Initial Mini-Fiber Node Architecture Mini- FN HE mFN mFNXL 6/11/99
    • Initial Mini-Fiber Node Architecture Mini- FN HE mFN mFNXL 6/11/99
    • SIX MONTH STUDY completed 3/99 Define Network Upgrade Strategy to Balance Near- Near-term and Long-term Needs Long-  Network Design and Cost Analysis:  600+ miles, multiple scenarios  Key Results:  Incremental cost with deep fiber penetration  Opportunities in:  Reducing power consumption for 2-way services  Reducing terminal and operation cost  Ability to support future demands  Opportunities to Improve Current System While Migrating to New InfrastructureXL 6/11/99
    • MULTIPLEXED FIBER PASSIVE COAXXL 6/11/99
    • LightWire TM HUB MuxNode mFN mFN Existing/reduced New fiber along coax branch  Passive coax between mFN and subscribers  Reduced actives, power consumption, and maintenance  MuxNode to reduce cost of deep fiber penetration  Multi-dimension Multiplexing/demultiplexingXL 6/11/99
    • TM LightWire HUB MuxNode TV New IP DTV DOCSIS New IP New IP New IP Analog & TSD Digital TV Today 10 50 550 750 1G  Increased bandwidth and flexibility for DOCSIS-based services  Simultaneously support current & future (new IP) systemsXL 6/11/99
    • MIGRATION Phase 1:  Establish A New Infrastructure  Reduce actives and system power consumption  Create more bandwidth for DOCSIS-based services  Improve reliability Phase 2:  Future Proofing  More capacity & flexibility (10-100Mbps/50-100 HHP)  Low-cost, low-power-consumption user terminals  Provisioning for future opportunitiesXL 6/11/99
    • PLATFORM COMPARISON HUB MuxNode mFN B Mux/Demx Phase / MAC 1 R RFI Data AM-VSB DTV AM- Voice 5 5 550 750 1G RF End-to-End B Phase / MAC 2 R Mux/ Demx RFI Current Services 1G 100 750 1G  MAC Demarc Digital Baseband  RF DemarcXL 6/11/99
    • AN INTEGRATED PLATFORM -- Option #1 PH SH MuxNode mFN TV XTR RCV-A D D TSD ITU-A W W XTR Today RCV-A D D Filter RCV M M ITU-A 1:8 Coupler XTRV Modem RCV-D New RCV-D DWDM C ITU-D Mux IP C RCV-D Demux Phase 2 ITU-D DWDM ITU-A: Analog ITU ITU-D: Digital ITU RCV-A: Analog RCV RCV-D: Digital RCV  Integrated Platform with Phased Development  Off-the-shelf for Phase 1 with Phase 2 provisioningXL 6/11/99
    • AN INTEGRATED PLATFORM -- Option #2 PH SH MuxNode mFN TV XTR RCV-A D D TSD ITU-A W W XTR Today RCV-A D D Filter RCV M M ITU-A 1:8 Coupler XTRV Modem RCV-D New RCV-D DWDM C ITU-D Mux IP C RCV-D Demux Phase 2 ITU-D DWDM ITU-A: Analog ITU ITU-D: Digital ITU RCV-A: Analog RCV RCV-D: Digital RCV  Integrated Platform with Phased Development  Off-the-shelf for Phase 1 with Phase 2 provisioningXL 6/11/99
    • MUXNODE PLATFORM 1:8 RCV ITU-A 1:8 XTRV ASK Dem ITU-D Mux RCV-D Demux  Multi-dimension (RF, optical, and digital) mux/demuxXL 6/11/99
    • mFN PLATFORM RCV Standard Fiber Node D D Platform XTR-A RCV-D Phase 2 FSK ASK FSK HPF HPF Add-on Mod Mod Demod HPF FPGA HPF  GaAs high-gain amplifiers for maximum mFN coverage  Phase 2: RF and MAC demarcationXL 6/11/99
    • ADVANTAGES  Operation Savings  61% reduction in active components  Reduced power consumption  Simplification of maintenance  Improved Performance  Reduced ingress noise funneling (10-48MHz operation)  Increased RF bandwidth  Improved reliability  Future Proof  Flexibility between current track and future opportunities  Improved QoS and potential terminal cost reductionXL 6/11/99
    • OPERATION SAVINGS  Current Network: 5.5 actives/mileXL 6/11/99
    • OPERATION SAVINGS  61% reduction in active components  21+% improvement in reliabilityXL 6/11/99
    • COST AND SAVING Potential Saving: 250 200  Mitigates Future Node Capital Cost/HHP Splitting 150  Customer Satisfaction 100  $11/HHP/year Operating Saving: 50  $5 - 8/HHP Sweep  $1 - 2/HHP Powering 0  $1/HHP Service call Current MFPC  $1/HHP Customer call Fiber Optics mFN Amplifier Reverse Sw eep Passive  $1/HHP Credit/churn Pow er Supply Engineering Taxes  Potential Terminal Cost  $40/HHP Incremental Cost ReductionXL 6/11/99
    • DELAY COMPARISON 1000 100 Average delay (ms) 10 mFN-NAD CM 1 0.1 mFN-NAD Cable modem 0.01 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Number of active usersXL 6/11/99
    • PRIORITY PROVISIONING Low (20) Medium (10) High (20) 50 40 Utilization (%) 30 150Kbps 240Kbps 20 100Kbps 10 0 26 51 77 102 128 154 179 205 230 256 282 307 Request Packet Rate (Kbps/station) 26XL 6/11/99
    • BOUNDED DELAY 6 Average Delay (ms) 5 Low Priority (20) 4 3 Medium Priority (10) 2 1 High Priority (20) 0 100 200 300 Request Packet Rate (Kbps/station)XL 6/11/99
    • Field Trial  Objective:  Support planned upgrade: bandwidth expansion  Test technology, verify cost & operation saving  Trial Scope:  520 miles (66,619 HHP) in Salt Lake Metro  Phased development and implementation  Schedule:  Service launching: October, 1999  Data collection: January, 2000XL 6/11/99
    • PROJECT SCOPE  Design Optimization  Maximize the number of amplifiers replaced per mFN  Minimize overall network power consumption  Define design limiting factors  Investigate MDU compatibility  Equipment Development:  Technology feasibility  Cost and time to market  Implementation and Data Collection  Front-end labor cost  Baseline and new data (service call, number of failures, MTTR, etc)  Change in sweeping and certification due to the new architectureXL 6/11/99
    • CURRENT STATUS  Vendor Selection: 4/29/99  Trial Area Selection: 4/29/99  Design Guideline: 5/3/99  Project Scope Documentation: 5/7/99  First Unit Delivery: 6/16/99  Installation: 6/22/99  Service Launching 10/99  Data Collection/Proposition 1/2000XL 6/11/99
    • We’ll seeXL 6/11/99