Designing for Play
   Christian Crumlish
   consumer experience evangelist, AOL




 WebVisions 2010 | Portland, Oregon
  ...
design
play
play acting
Signs of Life (who else is here?)
 What
 A person wants to have some indication of
 who else frequents the site she is vis...
Buddy List (can Timmy come out to play?)
 What
 The user wants a distinct list of people she
 knows (friends, coworkers, f...
masks
make believe
reimagining
Profile (who am I in this context?)
 What
 The user wants a central, public location to display all the
 relevant content ...
Avatars (how do I want to appear?)
 What
 A user wants to have a visual
 representation of themselves as part of
 their on...
games
invitation
     13
Welcome Area (invitation to the dance)
 What
 A user registers for a new service and
 needs to have a sense of what can be...
rules
Community Norms (set the groundrules)
A principle of community management is to
establish and communicate social norms to
...
goals
Collecting (gathering and displaying tokens)
    What
    A user wants to save an item for later viewing,
    sharing, or ...
competition
Points (what’s my score?)
What
Participants want a tangible measurement of their
accomplishments for personal satisfaction...
Leaderboard (how do I measure up?)
What
In highly competitive communities using a ranking
system, users may want to know w...
cooperation
Collaborative Editing (win-win)
What
People like to be able to work together on
documents, encyclopedias, and software
cod...
music
tuning
Constant Refinement (fine tuning)
What
Social media is a two way street: read/write. In
addition to providing tool for sha...
28
ensemble
30
frameworks
Leave Things Unfinished (room to play)
What
This principle nds form in a number of familiar
concepts: customization, skinn...
control
34
chaos
36
curation




           37
flow
thanks!




@mediajunkie
http://mediajunk.ie
Designing for Play at WebVisions 2010
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Designing for Play at WebVisions 2010

2,479

Published on

Drawing lessons from play (play acting, game play, and the playing of music) to inform the design of social and other generative systems.

Published in: Design, Technology

Designing for Play at WebVisions 2010

  1. 1. Designing for Play Christian Crumlish consumer experience evangelist, AOL WebVisions 2010 | Portland, Oregon May 20, 2010 1 @mediajunkie
  2. 2. design
  3. 3. play
  4. 4. play acting
  5. 5. Signs of Life (who else is here?) What A person wants to have some indication of who else frequents the site she is visiting and the she isn’t alone. Use When • Use this pattern to signal the transient presence of other visitors. • Use this pattern to give the current visitor a sense that she has company while reading the blog, especially if she recognizes some of the faces or names.
  6. 6. Buddy List (can Timmy come out to play?) What The user wants a distinct list of people she knows (friends, coworkers, family) to communicate with in real time. Use When Use this pattern when offering just-in-time communications, such as instant messaging. Buddy list utilizes concepts like Who’s Here Now and Ambient Intimacy
  7. 7. masks
  8. 8. make believe
  9. 9. reimagining
  10. 10. Profile (who am I in this context?) What The user wants a central, public location to display all the relevant content and information about themselves to others – both those they know and those they don’t. Use When • Use this pattern when your site encourages a lot of user-generated content and you want one place to show a speci c user’s contribution. • Use this pattern when you want to allow users to look up another user to learn more about them. • Use this pattern when you want to allow users to express their personality. • Use this pattern to allow users to share information about themselves to others.
  11. 11. Avatars (how do I want to appear?) What A user wants to have a visual representation of themselves as part of their online identity. Use When • Use this pattern when the user wants to have a visual associated with their identity. Identity doesn’t alway have to manifest itself in a complicated or robust pro le. Be appropriate for your context.
  12. 12. games
  13. 13. invitation 13
  14. 14. Welcome Area (invitation to the dance) What A user registers for a new service and needs to have a sense of what can be done at the site and how to get started. Use When • Use this pattern when a new user rst accesses the site. • Use this pattern to acquaint the user with important or useful features.
  15. 15. rules
  16. 16. Community Norms (set the groundrules) A principle of community management is to establish and communicate social norms to the participants in your community While this may be done with interface copy, help text, support forums, newbie tutorials and so forth, it’s best communicated directly from member to member. Founders and community managers can play the role of Model Citizen to demonstrate desirable behavior.
  17. 17. goals
  18. 18. Collecting (gathering and displaying tokens) What A user wants to save an item for later viewing, sharing, or discussion. Use When • Use this pattern to enable people to save web sites, pages, clippings, photos, videos or other items in an online environment. • Use this pattern to allow people to show off, share or collaborate around a collection of online items.
  19. 19. competition
  20. 20. Points (what’s my score?) What Participants want a tangible measurement of their accomplishments for personal satisfaction and to make comparisons with other competitors. Use When • Use this pattern when the community is highly competitive, and the activities that users engage in are competitive in nature, such as fantasy sports or games. • Speci cally, don't use this pattern when • The activities that users engage in are not competitive in nature (e.g., writing recipes, or sharing photos). • The awarding of points might demean or devalue the activity that they're meant to reward. By pinning an arbitrary incentive value to an activity, you may unintentionally replace a user's satisfying intrinsic motivation with a petty extrinsic one.
  21. 21. Leaderboard (how do I measure up?) What In highly competitive communities using a ranking system, users may want to know who are the very best performers in a category or overall. Use When • The community is highly competitive, and the activities that users engage in are competitive in nature (e.g., player-vs-player contests, or coaching a fantasy football team.) • You want to enable player-to-player comparisons, or permit users to de nitively settle "Who is better?" arguments. • Don't use this pattern when the activities that users engage in are not competitive in nature (e.g., writing recipes, or sharing photos).
  22. 22. cooperation
  23. 23. Collaborative Editing (win-win) What People like to be able to work together on documents, encyclopedias, and software codebases. Use When • Use this pattern when you wish to enable your site members to work together to curate their collective wisdom or document their shared knowledge.
  24. 24. music
  25. 25. tuning
  26. 26. Constant Refinement (fine tuning) What Social media is a two way street: read/write. In addition to providing tool for sharing and publishing media, you can provide your users with interfaces for zeroing in on the streams they're interested in and then sifting through them for the most interesting and relevant Use When objects in the stream. Use when you want to enable your users to update their experience on a constant basis and when there’s no possible way you could anticipate the ideal con guration for each one of your users.
  27. 27. 28
  28. 28. ensemble
  29. 29. 30
  30. 30. frameworks
  31. 31. Leave Things Unfinished (room to play) What This principle nds form in a number of familiar concepts: customization, skinning, user- contributed tags and the emergent folksonomies they can give rise to. Use When You might call this part of the process "meta- design." Rather then giving our users a sh, we are giving them a rod, reel, bait, and instructions to teach them how to sh. We design the rules of the system but not all of the outcomes.
  32. 32. control
  33. 33. 34
  34. 34. chaos
  35. 35. 36
  36. 36. curation 37
  37. 37. flow
  38. 38. thanks! @mediajunkie http://mediajunk.ie
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×