WISPRwandaGroup Members:Wendy TanYuen Zi ChunTan Ying TingKoo Lay SzeLiewJie Chun<br />
Social Inequality<br />Twa, Hutu and Tutsis<br />Tutsis as herders were the upper class<br />Hutus as farmers were the low...
Cont…<br />German favoured the Tutsi class<br />In 1916, Belgium took over Rwanda<br />Hutus was forced to work under supe...
Cont…<br />Hutus begins demanding for social equality in around 1946 post World War II<br />Millions Tutsis dead<br />Tuts...
Prejudices leading to discrimination <br />The Tutsi were generally taller than the Hutus and the Twas, and were distinct ...
Prejudices leading to discrimination<br />1920, Belgians bring northwest Hutu kingdoms under Tutsi royalty rule.<br />&quo...
Rwanda:Gender and the Treatment of Women<br />Gender discrimination<br />Lack of access to resources:<br />Women’s experie...
Gender discrimination<br />Lack of resources:<br />Only 5% of the loans from the Banquespopulaires were allocated to women...
Treatment of women during genocide<br />During genocide:<br />In the 100 days of genocide, about one million people were k...
Treatment of women during genocide<br />After  genocide:<br />Those survived in the genocide were victims of sexual violen...
Other Important Social, Economic And Political Factors<br />Social Factors<br />Deep distrust is a big factor of Rwanda so...
What about present day Singapore?<br />Prejudices and discrimination from Rwanda situation with Singapore in 2009<br />Sim...
How to prevent the imagined futureof 2061 from becoming a reality?<br />Proposed Solutions to minimize social divisions<br...
      End of    Presentation<br />  Thank You!!!<br />
References<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Rwanda<br />http://fletcher.tufts.edu/faculty/uvin/pdfs/reports/ci...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Wisp(Rwanda)

1,501

Published on

Published in: Education
13 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • 1. Promotion of having big families can be understood as an increase in population if implemented. With a population density in the top three list of the world, increased population will need to severe problems such as decrease in individual living space and even more packed government housing. Although the solution can be effective in preventing the imagined 2061, is the problems it might cause justified by the problem it can solve?

    2. Economic downturns are usually short term events (such as within five years or so unless it is a major economic upheaval) and thus in the long term, married couples opting to focus on work instead of making their family cannot be due to the economic downturns, and instead it is the change in the mindset of people in recent times that should be considered in proposing solutions.

    3. Singapore is doing very well in its effort to raise awareness of the importance of water conservation through the case studies in social study about the lack of water and the various interaction with neighboring countries in regard to water purchase, which is studied by every school age children. The massive investment spent in research technology for other methods of obtaining fresh water. Can you ellaborate on the meaning of the point 'Singapore lack awareness in the importance and consequences of conserving water.'
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • i feel that the world is changing right now... more and more women are getting higher 'ranks' in work where you dont see them in the past. however, the pace is still too slow as there are more men with higher 'ranks' and i dont think there would be much changes to this aspect. singapore is dependable on many countries no matter is it for water or for protection or trade. singapore's relationship with other countries isnt that bad otherwise, we would have been taken over by another country.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Maintain good relationship doesn't mean they will guarantee to supply the water to Singapore.

    Maintain good relationship doesn't mean they will guarantee to share their benefits to the neighbour country.

    As a Malaysian,what I can says is, if the current contract for water supplement between Malaysia and Singapore remain the same in the future, I afraid Malaysia will make a big loss eventually.

    Water might become limited resources in the future due to high pollution rate globally. Who knows eventually? It may cause this solution become the worse situation in Singapore.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • i dont think so that singapore is heavily lower ratio of women. and about the point when you mention in your slide 12 saying that singapore also devalues women, why do you say so? you are saying in general or just in family. as i believe that in singapore the discrimination of women is not that sever. thus when you say that singapore devalues women make it seems like women are not treated fairly in singapore as compared to rwanda.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Reply to: kokfuan

    Because part of Singapore water supplies comes from Malaysia, and water is always used as a political bargaining tool, you can refer to this link 'http://www1.american.edu/ted/ice/singapore.htm' for more info.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,501
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
34
Comments
13
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Wisp(Rwanda)

    1. 1. WISPRwandaGroup Members:Wendy TanYuen Zi ChunTan Ying TingKoo Lay SzeLiewJie Chun<br />
    2. 2. Social Inequality<br />Twa, Hutu and Tutsis<br />Tutsis as herders were the upper class<br />Hutus as farmers were the lower class<br />In 1890, German took over during Brussels conference<br />
    3. 3. Cont…<br />German favoured the Tutsi class<br />In 1916, Belgium took over Rwanda<br />Hutus was forced to work under supervision of Tutsis<br />Each citizen was issued a identity card which defined them as legally Hutu or Tutsi<br />
    4. 4. Cont…<br />Hutus begins demanding for social equality in around 1946 post World War II<br />Millions Tutsis dead<br />Tutsis with positions of political power had being sent into exile <br />1962 Rwanda became independent with Hutus in the ascendancy.<br />
    5. 5. Prejudices leading to discrimination <br />The Tutsi were generally taller than the Hutus and the Twas, and were distinct in physical appearance.<br />The Roman Catholic Church and Belgian colonial authorities considered the Hutus and Tutsis different ethnic races based on their physical differences and patterns of migration. <br />Belgian colonizers accepted existing class system of a minority Tutsi upper class and lower classes of Hutus and Tutsi commoners.<br />The Belgian colonist depended on the Tutsi aristocracy to collect taxes and enforce Belgian policies. <br />Hutus later stripped of power.<br />
    6. 6. Prejudices leading to discrimination<br />1920, Belgians bring northwest Hutu kingdoms under Tutsi royalty rule.<br />&quot;Tutsi&quot;, &quot;Hutu&quot; and &quot;Twa&quot; were indicated on identity cards. <br />Differences between Hutu and Tutsi reinforced, developed separate educational systems for each.<br />The Rwandan Civil War vastly increased the ethnic tensions in the country and led to the rise of Hutu Power.<br />
    7. 7. Rwanda:Gender and the Treatment of Women<br />Gender discrimination<br />Lack of access to resources:<br />Women’s experiences of poverty may be more acute than those of men because of a number of gender based forms of exclusion.<br />Women had no rights to inherit or own the property or land.<br />Play a greater role in agriculture, women experience difficulty owning land and other farming assets, regardless of legal changes.<br />
    8. 8. Gender discrimination<br />Lack of resources:<br />Only 5% of the loans from the Banquespopulaires were allocated to women.<br />2/3 of the female-headed household Grade 3 as compared with the male(48%).<br />Less educated:<br />Less literate than, therefore less involved in wages sector and generate low income.<br />Rate of female-headed household increase from 1994 to 34% in 1996.<br />
    9. 9. Treatment of women during genocide<br />During genocide:<br />In the 100 days of genocide, about one million people were killed, and an estimated 250,000 to 500,000 women and girls were raped by Hutus.<br />Age does not matter, no one were spared from sexual violence.<br />Victims are selected based on their gender and Tutsi ethnicity.<br />Raped in victims’ or perpetrators’ houses or in the public like schools, government buildings and churches.<br />
    10. 10. Treatment of women during genocide<br />After genocide:<br />Those survived in the genocide were victims of sexual violence and have greatly affected them.<br />Unwanted children- Thought of self-induced abortions, but still there were 15000 “children of hate” were born.<br />Severe health problems faced-Children gets HIV from their mothers.<br />HIV rate from 1% to 11% in 1997.<br />
    11. 11. Other Important Social, Economic And Political Factors<br />Social Factors<br />Deep distrust is a big factor of Rwanda society, this distrust occurs between people and the state, people are seen as overbearing and exercise power unjustly.<br />Economic Factors<br />The 1994 genocide destroyed Rwanda&apos;s fragile economic base, severely impoverished the population and the ability to attract private and external investment.<br />Thus the economic factor drop devastatingly, gross domestic income (GDI) growth rate of 6.5% from 1973 to 1980 slowed to an average of 2.9% a year from 1980 through 1985 and was not improving at all from 1986 to 1990.<br />Political Factors<br />The State in Rwanda presents contradictory faces, power over states and weak in human and financial resources. The Government distrust political society, severely constrain civil society and free speech.<br />
    12. 12. What about present day Singapore?<br />Prejudices and discrimination from Rwanda situation with Singapore in 2009<br />Similarities<br />Both countries devalues woman, they did not realize the importance of woman, Singapore flavorsome boy than girl because of tradition thinking of carry on family lines<br />Differences<br />Rwanda resolve prejudices and discrimination by initiating a war which only cause more conflicts, but Singapore only find tack able solutions.<br />
    13. 13. How to prevent the imagined futureof 2061 from becoming a reality?<br />Proposed Solutions to minimize social divisions<br />Improve family relationship by spending more time together to understand the happiness of having a big family.<br />Maintain good relationship with Malaysia and not taking advantage of the water supplies, we should also conserve water.<br />Eliminate traditional mindset of only giving birth to males and realize the inequality for females through media or campaign, thus increasing the number of females babies.<br />Problems/Challenges Met With the Proposed Solutions<br />Due to economic downturn, many married adult opt to spend more time at work rather than with family.<br />Singapore lack awareness in the importance and consequences of conserving water.<br />Traditional thinking of giving birth to males to carry on family lines.<br />
    14. 14. End of Presentation<br /> Thank You!!!<br />
    15. 15. References<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Rwanda<br />http://fletcher.tufts.edu/faculty/uvin/pdfs/reports/civilsociety.pdf<br />http://www.articlesbase.com/history-articles/what-exactly-happened-in-rwanda-847130.html<br />
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×