XS Japan 2008 Ganeti English

  • 369 views
Uploaded on

Iustin Pop: Project Ganeti at Google

Iustin Pop: Project Ganeti at Google

More in: Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
369
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Xen Summit 2008 Tokyo Virtualization deployments A discussion of various challenges in virtualized environments Iustin Pop Ganeti team Google Switzerland 1 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 2. Overview •Introduction •Abstract model •Scaling the machine pool size Up to 10 Up to 100 Up to 1,000 •VM types •Hardware evolution •Ganeti in Google 2 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 3. Introduction Use cases of virtualization: •traditional: improved resource utilization consolidate low­usage machines •but the technology has matured: focus moves to higher layers (management) large numbers of both physical and virtual machine more uses (VM types) Disclaimer: •the presentation content is not representative of Google's usage of  virtualization •the presentation solely refers to the use of virtualization in Google for internal,  corporate purposes and not external services or products (e.g.  www.google.com) 3 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 4. Abstract model app app app app app er monitoring lay machine lifecycle controls n access tio ica ppl a app er lay n monitoring tio cluster machine ra lifecycle controls eg access int resource mgmt. machine mt resource mgmt. e mg urc reso hypervisor resource mgmt. base OS base OS hardware layer hardware hardware multiple app single-app or virtualized 4 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 5. Scaling the number of machines The machine pool size influences the ROI for different features •at lower sizes, efficiency at lower levels is most important •growing the number of machines increases the importance of the  management layer •HW failure rate importance varies •automation cost is more­or­less constant, but benefits vary greatly 5 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 6. Up to 10 physical machines Main characteristics: •Hypervisor and HW efficiency is paramount •Small number of machines translates into: small customer base low number of HW failures reduced benefit of automation greater chance of same HW profile Challenges: •application compatibility 6 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 7. Up to 100 physical machines Similar to non­virtualized environments: •component failure is rare, but part of normal life •automation benefits start to show (deployment, configuration, etc) Specific to virtual environments: •diverse configurations and machine mobility mean VMs will be shifted around  and their HW profile can change dynamically •cost savings are split between resource utilization and operational gains Challenges: •accommodating various customer types •integration of VM and non­VM environments 7 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 8. Up to 1,000 physical machines Number of machines affect cost profile: •HW costs are linear, but operations costs no longer •Automation and standardization across all layers have big benefits the hypervisor and HW layers can be deeply abstracted by the management tools automation of all procedures is paramount to keeping the VM environment healthy Challenges: •multiple customers, same management toolset •software upgrades for physical machines •dealing with multiple HW generations 8 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 9. VM types Deployments will have multiple VM types: •server/desktop/lab/etc. •central administration versus end­user administration •integration of all these into the same machine pool 9 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 10. VM types ­ server •stable, long­life •monitoring is important •resource usage has smoother variation •usually continuous operation 10 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 11. VM types ­ desktop •less stable life •bursty usage •'business hours' type of operation •GUI/user friendly interface to VM­specific operations very important •monitoring integration good for debugging, but less for the big mass of end­ users 11 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 12. VM types ­ lab •short lived •end­user provisioning  out of own resource pool •monitoring less useful than quick provisioning •snapshot, rollback and similar features important 12 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 13. Keeping pace with hardware Commodity hardware: •rapidly changing specifications: cores memory disk size •and not so rapid: network/disk bandwidth single­CPU speed This results in asymmetric growth: •resource allocation needs to handle this •cluster architecture changes over time 13 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 14. Ganeti @ Google Design goals and principles •sits between hardware layer and integration layer •fully automate node­ and cluster­level resource management •needs base OS and hypervisor •does not provide monitoring, access controls or global provisioning (across  clusters) •principles: not dependent on specific hardware (e.g. external shared storage) scales (almost) linearly with the number of systems 14 Copyright by Google Inc
  • 15.   Questions & Answers 15 Copyright by Google Inc