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Delivering Cultural Heritage to Different Audiences
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Delivering Cultural Heritage to Different Audiences

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How Digitisation Programmes can ensure that the content created is available for use by as many different users as possible

How Digitisation Programmes can ensure that the content created is available for use by as many different users as possible

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Delivering Cultural Heritage to Different Audiences Delivering Cultural Heritage to Different Audiences Presentation Transcript

  • Delivering Cultural Heritage to Different Audiences The JISC Digitisation Programme – Educa Online, Berlin 2008 www.jisc.ac.uk/digitisation Five centuries of unique resources for learning, teaching & research
  • Delivering Cultural Heritage to Different Audiences Alastair Dunning Programme Manager, JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee) [email_address] , +44 0203 006 6065 Educa Online, Berlin, November 2008
  • Background
    • Digitisation Programme “To build sustainable and coherent e-resources that meet the needs of and are of benefit to learning, teaching and research”
    • Two phases of Digitisation Programme
    • Phase 1 – 2003-2007, £10m ( € 14m), 6 projects
    • Phase 2 – 2007-2009, £12m ( € 17m), 16 projects
    • Material drawn from UK universities, museums and archives
    • All projects must make material available for at least five years to at least educational community in UK
    • Many projects are making their material available via open access for longer periods
    • http://www.jisc.ac.uk/digitisation/
  • Funder JISC Project (e.g. Oxford Uni) Project (British Library) Project (National Archives) Project (British Film Institute) Users Postgraduates Users Researchers Users Teachers Users Lecturers Users General Public … plus plenty others of users and links Relationship between funders and projects had important influence on relationship between project and end-users
  • Five Strategies to allow for Creating, Digitising & Adapting Learning Content
    • 5 strategies for funders to help ensure content is available and can re-used by different types of users – “Creating, Digitising & Adapting Learning Content”
    • Tender process allows funders to select projects which are in alignment with the strategies
    • Some of the strategies are implemented at the start of a project
    • Others are more of a process that are implemented during the project’s lifetime
    • Project themselves will also contribute to ensuring content re-use
  • 1. Ensuring licensed usage for educational sector
    • All projects must agree to clear copyright to allow for re-use of the digitised objects in (at least) the educational sector
    • Sample copyright licence supplied by JISC which projects can adapt as needs be
    • Users should always be able to download content to their desktop
    • Projects also sign licence with funders to ensure funders have right to distribute digitised material
  • 1. Ensuring licensed usage for educational sector
    • Modern Welsh Journals Online
    • All significant Welsh journals since 1900
    • Project lead National Library of Wales (NLW) signs agreements with publishers to allow for content to be made freely available online
    • Users will be able to download articles for lectures, notes, PowerPoint, private research etc.
    http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/ programme_digitisation/welshjournals.aspx
  • 2. Use of open standards
    • Projects must use open standards for file formats where possible
    • Commonly-used metadata standards are also encouraged
    • Avoidance of proprietary standards and technologies
    • Some pragmatism required for some formats (e.g. audio/visual data)
  • 2. Use of open standards
    • 19th Century Pamphlets Online
    • 1m pages of pamphlets relating to UK social, economic, religious history etc.
    • Images digitised as TIFF
    • Text digitised as TXT
    • METS, MODS and PREMIS metadata standards all being used
    http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_digitisation/pamphlets.aspx
  • 3. Establishing links between content and the national curriculum
    • During tender process, potential projects make explicit links between the content they wish to digitise and specific courses (in whatever subject area)
    • Relevant to curricula of schools, colleges and, more generally, university courses
    • Thus material digitised can easily be adapted for current usage within these environments
  • 3. Establishing links between content and the national curriculum
    • Freeze Frame - 20,000 images recording polar exploration
    • Project identified courses and curricula where project could have impact
      • University – Geology, Biology, Anthropology, etc.
      • Colleges and Schools – Art and Design, History, Geography etc.
    • Construction of learning work packages built into project plan
    http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_digitisation/polar.aspx
  • 4. Developing strategic links with other relevant partners
    • Building partnerships allow for exposure of content to specific areas
    • Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA)
    • Quality Improvement Agency (QIA) for post-16 further education
    • National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) in USA
  • 5. Supporting assisted take up programmes
    • Building specific programmes to promote take up of digitised content
    • Developing case studies, pedagogic materials, providing technological support
    • Associated workshops and community building
    • Newsfilm Online ( http://newsfilm.bufvc.ac.uk/ - test version)
    • Assisted take-up materials (https://hullnewsfilm.wikispaces.com/)
  • Five Strategies
    • 1. Ensuring licensed usage for educational sector
    • 2. Use of open standards
    • 3. Establishing links between content and the national curriculum
    • 4. Developing strategic links with other relevant partners
    • 5. Supporting assisted take up programmes
    • Any Questions?
    • Alastair Dunning, [email_address] , 0203 006 6065
  • Delivering Cultural Heritage to Different Audiences Alastair Dunning Programme Manager, JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee) [email_address] , +44 0203 006 6065 Any Questions?