Sesion 5 Las Externalidades, Mercado de Factores y la Distribucion de la Renta

11,064 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
11,064
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
61
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
316
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • El ingreso marginal social de la contaminación es el ingreso que obtiene la sociedad en su conjunto debido a que hay una unidad adicional de contaminación. (ahorro en factores productivos por producir una tonelada más de contaminación que se pueden destinar a otros fines)
  • Figure Caption: Figure 17-1: The Socially Optimal Quantity of Pollution Pollution yields both costs and benefits. Here the curve MSC shows how the marginal cost to society as a whole from emitting one more ton of pollution emissions depends on the quantity of emissions. The curve MSB shows how the marginal benefit to society as a whole of emitting an additional ton of pollution emissions depends on the quantity of pollution emissions. The socially optimal quantity of pollution is QOPT; at that quantity, the marginal social benefit of pollution is equal to the marginal social cost, corresponding to $200.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 17-2: Why a Market Economy Produces Too Much Pollution In the absence of government intervention, the quantity of pollution will be QMKT, the level at which the marginal social benefit of pollution is zero. This is an inefficiently high quantity of pollution: the marginal social cost, $400, greatly exceeds the marginal social benefit, $0. An optimal Pigouvian tax of $200, the value of the marginal social cost of pollution when it equals the marginal social benefit of pollution, can move the market to the socially optimal quantity of pollution, QOPT.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 17-5: Negative Externalities and Production Livestock production generates external costs, so the marginal social cost curve, MSC, of livestock, corresponds to the supply curve, S, shifted upward by the marginal external cost. Panel (a) shows that without government action, the market produces the quantity QMKT. It is greater than the socially optimal quantity of livestock production, QOPT, the quantity at which MSC crosses the demand curve, D. At QMKT, the market price, PMKT, is less than PMSC, the true marginal cost to society of livestock production. Panel (b) shows how an optimal Pigouvian tax on livestock production, equal to its marginal external cost, moves the production to QOPT, resulting in lower output and a higher price to consumers.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 17-4: Positive Externalities and Consumption Consumption of flu shots generates external benefits, so the marginal social benefit curve, MSB, of flu shots, corresponds to the demand curve, D, shifted upward by the marginal external benefit. Panel (a) shows that without government action, the market produces QMKT. It is lower than the socially optimal quantity of consumption, QOPT, the quantity at which MSB crosses the supply curve, S. At QMKT, the marginal social benefit of another flu shot, PMSB, is greater than the marginal benefit to consumers of another flu shot, PMKT. Panel (b) shows how an optimal Pigouvian subsidy to consumers, equal to the marginal external benefit, moves consumption to QOPT by lowering the price paid by consumers.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 17-4: Positive Externalities and Consumption Consumption of flu shots generates external benefits, so the marginal social benefit curve, MSB, of flu shots, corresponds to the demand curve, D, shifted upward by the marginal external benefit. Panel (a) shows that without government action, the market produces QMKT. It is lower than the socially optimal quantity of consumption, QOPT, the quantity at which MSB crosses the supply curve, S. At QMKT, the marginal social benefit of another flu shot, PMSB, is greater than the marginal benefit to consumers of another flu shot, PMKT. Panel (b) shows how an optimal Pigouvian subsidy to consumers, equal to the marginal external benefit, moves consumption to QOPT by lowering the price paid by consumers.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 17-5: Negative Externalities and Production Livestock production generates external costs, so the marginal social cost curve, MSC, of livestock, corresponds to the supply curve, S, shifted upward by the marginal external cost. Panel (a) shows that without government action, the market produces the quantity QMKT. It is greater than the socially optimal quantity of livestock production, QOPT, the quantity at which MSC crosses the demand curve, D. At QMKT, the market price, PMKT, is less than PMSC, the true marginal cost to society of livestock production. Panel (b) shows how an optimal Pigouvian tax on livestock production, equal to its marginal external cost, moves the production to QOPT, resulting in lower output and a higher price to consumers.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 20-2: The Production Function for George and Martha’s Farm Panel (a) shows how the quantity of output of wheat on George and Martha’s farm depends on the number of workers employed. Panel (b) shows how the marginal product of labor depends on the number of workers employed.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 20-3: The Value of the Marginal Product Curve This curve shows how the value of the marginal product of labor depends on the number of workers employed. It slopes downward because of diminishing returns to labor in production. To maximize profit, George and Martha choose the level of employment at which the value of the marginal product of labor is equal to the market wage rate. For example, at a wage rate of $200 the profit-maximizing level of employment is 5 workers, shown by point A. The value of the marginal product curve of a factor is the producer’s individual demand curve for that factor.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 20-4: Shifts of the Value of the Marginal Product Curve Panel (a) shows the effect of an increase in the price of wheat on George and Martha’s demand for labor. The value of the marginal product of labor curve shifts upward, from VMPL1to VMPL2. If the market wage rate remains at $200, profit-maximizing employment rises from 5 workers to 8 workers, shown by the movement from point A to point B. Panel (b) shows the effect of a decrease in the price of wheat. The value of the marginal product of labor curve shifts downward, from VMPL1to VMPL3. At the market wage rate of $200, profit-maximizing employment falls from 5 workers to 2 workers, shown by the movement from point A to point C.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 20-5: All Producers Face the Same Wage Rate Although Farmer Jones grows wheat and Farmer Smith grows corn, they both compete in the same market for labor and so must pay the same wage rate, $200. Each producer hires labor up to the point at which VMPL= $200: 5 workers for Jones, 7 workers for Smith.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 20-6: Equilibrium in the Labor Market The market labor demand curve is the horizontal sum of the individual labor demand curves of all producers. Here the equilibrium wage rate is W*, the equilibrium employment level is L*, and every producer hires labor up to the point at which VMPL= W*. So labor is paid its equilibrium value of the marginal product, the value of the marginal product of the last worker hired in the labor market as a whole.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 20-7: Equilibria in the Land and Capital Markets Panel (a) illustrates equilibrium in the market for land; panel (b) illustrates equilibrium in the market for capital. The supply curve for land is relatively steep, reflecting the high cost of increasing the quantity of productive land. The supply curve for capital, in contrast, is relatively flat, due to the relatively high responsiveness of savings to changes in the rental rate for capital. The equilibrium rental rates for land and capital, as well as the equilibrium quantities transacted, are given by the intersections of the demand and supply curves. In a competitive land market, each unit of land will be paid the equilibrium value of the marginal product of land, R*Land. Likewise, in a competitive capital market, each unit of capital will be paid the equilibrium value of the marginal product of capital, R*.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 20-8: Median Earnings by Gender and Ethnicity, 2006 The U.S. labor market continues to show large differences across workers according to gender and ethnicity. Women are paid substantially less than men; African-American and Hispanic workers are paid substantially less than White male workers.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 20-9: Earnings Differentials by Education, Gender, and Ethnicity, 2006 It is clear that, regardless of gender or ethnicity, education pays: those with a high school diploma earn more than those without one, and those with a college degree earn substantially more than those with only a high school diploma. Other patterns are evident as well: for any given education level, White males earn more than every other group, and males earn more than females for any given ethnic group.
  • Figure Caption: Figure 20-10: The Individual Labor Supply Curve When the substitution effect of a wage increase dominates the income effect, the individual labor supply curve slopes upward, as in panel (a). Here a rise in the wage rate from $10 to $20 per hour increases the number of hours worked from 40 to 50. But when the income effect of a wage increase dominates the substitution effect, the individual labor supply curve slopes downward, as in panel (b). Here the same rise in the wage rate reduces the number of hours worked from 40 to 30.
  • Sesion 5 Las Externalidades, Mercado de Factores y la Distribucion de la Renta

    1. 1. Las externalidades. Mercado de factores y la distribución de la renta
    2. 2. Las externalidades
    3. 3. ¿Qué vamos a aprender? <ul><li>Qué se entiende por externalidades , por qué provocan ineficiencias en una economía de mercado y por qué justifican la intervención del gobierno en la economía. </li></ul><ul><li>La diferencia entre externalidades positivas y externalidades negativas. </li></ul><ul><li>La importancia del teorema de Coase, que explica cómo los agentes privados pueden resolver el problema de las externalidades. </li></ul><ul><li>Por qué alguna de las políticas gubernamentales para abordar el problema de las externalidades son eficientes y otras no. </li></ul><ul><li>Por qué la existencia de externalidades positivas justifica la política industrial. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Las externalidades <ul><li>Recordemos que el mercado perfectamente competitivo maximiza en el punto de equilibrio el beneficio total , entendiendo como tal la suma del beneficio de compradores y vendedores. </li></ul><ul><li>El problema surge cuando la actividad económica no sólo repercute en compradores y vendedores, sino que también afecta a terceros , y en ocasiones muy negativamente. Esto efectos no son tenidos en cuenta por compradores y vendedores a la hora de tomar sus decisiones. </li></ul><ul><li>Estos efectos secundarios no contemplados por compradores ni vendedores se denominan externalidades , que pueden se positivas (beneficios para un tercero) o negativas (perjuicios para un tercero) </li></ul>
    5. 5. La contaminación: una externalidad negativa. <ul><li>La contaminación es perjudicial. Sin embargo la mayoría de les veces la contaminación es el efecto secundario de actividades útiles . ( Ej. Las centrales térmicas que generan electricidad para alumbrar nuestras ciudades contaminan el aire, los fertilizantes utilizados para cultivar los alimentos contaminan los ríos) </li></ul><ul><li>Si la contaminación es un efecto secundario de actividades útiles, la óptima cantidad de contaminación no será cero . </li></ul><ul><li>Entonces, cuánta contaminación debería tener una sociedad? Cuales son los costes y beneficios de la contaminación? </li></ul>
    6. 6. Los costes y los ingresos de la contaminación <ul><li>El coste marginal social de la contaminación es el coste adicional que la sociedad en su conjunto soporta debido a que hay una unidad adicional de contaminación. </li></ul><ul><li>El ingreso marginal social de la contaminación es el ingreso que obtiene la sociedad en su conjunto debido a que hay una unidad adicional de contaminación. </li></ul><ul><li>La cantidad de contaminación socialmente óptima es la cantidad de contaminación que la sociedad elegiría tener si tomara en consideración todos los ingresos y todos los costes de la contaminación. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Cantidad de contaminación socialmente óptima. Coste marginal social, ingreso marginal social. Cantidad de emisiones contaminantes (toneladas) Q OPT 0 $200 Coste marginal social de la contaminación O Cantidad de contaminación socialmente óptima Punto socialmente óptimo Ingreso marginal social de la contaminación
    8. 8. Contaminación: un coste externo. <ul><li>Un coste externo es un coste que un individuo o empresa impone a otros sin que éstos reciban nada a cambio. </li></ul><ul><li>Un ingreso externo es un ingreso que un individuo o empresa proporciona a otros sin recibir nada a cambio. </li></ul><ul><li>Se denominan externalidades a los costes e ingresos externos; los costes externos son externalidades negativas, los ingresos externos son externalidades positivas. </li></ul><ul><li>La contaminación es un ejemplo de coste externo, o externalidad negativa; en contraste algunas actividades pueden producir beneficios externos, o externalidades positivas. </li></ul><ul><li>Sin intervención estatal, una economía de mercado generará mucha contaminación puesto que quienes contaminan no tienen en cuenta el coste impuesto a los demás </li></ul>.
    9. 9. Por qué produce demasiada contaminación una economía de mercado Q eq T Qh Qopt 0 $400 300 200 100 O Ingreso marginal social correspondiente a Qeq Cantidad de contaminación determinada por el mercado El resultado del mercado es ineficiente: el coste marginal social de la contaminación es mayor que el ingreso marginal social Coste social marginal, ingreso social marginal Cantidad de emisiones contaminantes (toneladas ) Cantidad de contaminación socialmente óptima Impuesto pigouviano óptimo sobre la contaminación Coste marginal social correspondiente a Qeq
    10. 10. Soluciones privadas a las externalidades <ul><li>Según el teorema de Coase, las economías siempre pueden alcanzar una asignación eficiente, incluso en presencia de externalidades, siempre y cuando los costes de transacción ( lo que les cuesta a los agentes alcanzar un acuerdo) sean suficientemente bajos. </li></ul><ul><li>La implicación del análisis de Coase es que las externalidades no tienen por qué provocar obligatoriamente la aparición de ineficiencias, puesto que los individuos tienen incentivos a negociar acuerdos que beneficien a todas las partes. </li></ul><ul><li>Estos tratos dan lugar a que los individuos tengan en cuenta las externalidades cuando toman sus decisiones. </li></ul><ul><li>Se dice que los agentes internalizan la externalidad cuando tienen en cuenta la externalidad al tomar sus decisiones </li></ul><ul><li>Sin embargo en muchas de las situaciones en las que hay externalidades, los costes de transacción impiden que los individuos negocien acuerdos. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Políticas orientadas a reducir las externalidades <ul><li>Cuando la iniciativa privada falla, puede estar justificada la intervención del estado para resolver las externalidades . </li></ul><ul><li>El estado interviene mayoritariamente de dos modos: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regulando las actividades: prohibiendo o promoviendo determinadas actuaciones según generen externalidades negativas o positivas. (Ej. Cierre de bares y discotecas a partir de cierta hora de la noche…) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Estableciendo correctores (subvenciones o penalizaciones), de modo que el impacto económico de las externalidades afecte directamente a la parte que la origina y por lo tanto la tenga en cuenta a la hora de tomar sus decisiones. ( Impuestos o subvenciones pigouvianos) </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Políticas contra la contaminación <ul><li>La regulación medioambiental , que consiste en una serie de leyes de obligado cumplimiento para productores y para consumidores. Ej. La ley que obliga a todos los vehículos a tener un catalizador que reduce las emisiones de sustancias químicas nocivas a la atmosfera. En general la regulación se muestra ineficiente por inflexible. </li></ul><ul><li>Correctores : Estos métodos son eficientes porque son flexibles, permitiendo que sean las empresas a las que les resulta más barato reducir la contaminación, las que así lo hagan. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Impuesto sobre emisiones: es un impuesto que depende de la cantidad de contaminación que genera una empresa. (Impuesto pigouviano) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Permisos de emisión comercializables: son autorizaciones que permiten emitir cantidades limitadas de sustancias contaminantes y que pueden se compradas y vendidas por las empresas contaminantes. </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Externalidades negativas. Impuestos a la producción. Ej. Canon a la cría de cerdos Cte Mg Social S 1 D Q Opt 1 PMkt Q S D Q Opt Q E E O O (a) Externalidad negativa (b) Impuesto óptimo Precio Cantidad Precio Cantidad Coste externo Precio que pagan los consumidores impuesto incluido Impuesto óptimo Precio que reciben los productores después de impuestos Mkt Mkt PCMgS P Opt
    14. 14. El consumo de tabaco genera importantes problemas de salud que conllevan un elevado coste de atención para la sanidad pública. El fumador, a la hora de tomar sus decisiones de compra, no tiene en cuenta este coste que tendrá que ser asumido por toda la sociedad. Por ello, el Estado puede intervenir fijando un impuesto sobre la cajetilla. La curva de demanda se desplazará hacia abajo. O D D E (a) Externalidad negativas Q 1 P 1 P 2 Q 2 O Precio Impuesto Cantidad 1 2 Externalidades negativas .Impuestos al consumo. Ej.Impuesto al consumo de tabaco
    15. 15. Ganancias privadas versus ganancias sociales <ul><li>No todas las externalidades son negativas. En algunos casos la actividad económica genera externalidades positivas . </li></ul><ul><li>Esto ocurre cuando la acción de un productor proporciona ingresos a otras personas, sin que ese productor sea compensado. </li></ul><ul><li>La externalidad positiva más importante en la economía moderna es la creación de conocimiento </li></ul><ul><li>Los efectos de la difusión de la tecnología son ganancias externas que surgen cuando el conocimiento se extiende entre individuos y empresas. </li></ul><ul><li>Una subvención pigouviana es un pago diseñado para incentivar la producción de bienes o servicios que generan efectos externos positivos </li></ul><ul><li>Las políticas industriales , son aquellas cuyo objetivo es incentivar la producción de bienes que generan efectos externos positivos. </li></ul>
    16. 16. Externalidades positivas . Subvenciones al consumo. Ej. Subvención a la instalación de placas solares O D D O (a) Externalidad positiva Precio Q Opt P Opt P Mkt Q Mkt O D O Cantidad Q Opt Q Mkt (b) Subsidio pigouviano óptimo E E Precio Precio de los productores con el subsidio Subsidio pigouviano óptimo Precio de los consumidores con el subsidio Beneficio externo Cantidad 2 1 PBMgS
    17. 17. Externalidades positivas (formación) <ul><li>Si una empresa prepara a sus empleados invirtiendo en formación, esto genera una externalidad positiva: esta formación beneficia al trabajador y a la empresa mientras el trabajador permanezca en la misma, pero cuando cambie de trabajo esta mayor formación beneficia a la sociedad en su conjunto al disponer de una mano de obra más cualificada. </li></ul><ul><li>El gobierno podría favorecer esta externalidad positiva subvencionando parte de los costes de formación de las empresas. </li></ul>
    18. 18. Externalidades positivas. Subvención a la formación en las empresas. O1 O 2 D Q 1 2 P Q O E (a) Externalidad positiva Precio Cantidad Subvención 2 Si una empresa prepara a sus empleados invirtiendo en formación, esto genera una externalidad positiva: esta formación beneficia al trabajador y a la empresa mientras el trabajador permanezca en la misma, pero cuando cambie de trabajo esta mayor formación beneficia a la sociedad en su conjunto al disponer de una mano de obra más cualificada. El gobierno puede favorecer esta externalidad positiva subvencionando parte de los costes de formación de las empresas. Esta subvención reduciría el coste de producción de esta empresa desplazando su curva de oferta hacia abajo. El punto de equilibrio se desplazará hacia la derecha, lo que implica un aumento del volumen de transacciones P 1
    19. 19. Mercado de factores y la distribución de la renta
    20. 20. Qué vamos a aprender <ul><li>Cómo se intercambian los factores de producción- recursos como la tierra y el trabajo, así como el capital físico y el capital humano- en los mercados de factores, determinando la distribución de la renta entre los factores. </li></ul><ul><li>Cómo la demanda de factores conduce a la teoría de la productividad marginal de la distribución de la renta . </li></ul><ul><li>Una explicación de las fuentes de disparidad salarial y el papel de la discriminación. </li></ul><ul><li>La forma en la que la decisión de un trabajador sobre la asignación de tiempo da lugar a la oferta de trabajo. </li></ul>
    21. 21. Los factores productivos de la economía <ul><li>Un factor productivo es cualquier recursos utilizado por las empresas para producir bienes y servicios. </li></ul><ul><li>Los factores de producción se compran y se venden en el mercado de factores productivos, y los precios en el mercado de factores se conocen por los precios de los factores. </li></ul><ul><li>¿Cuales son esos factores de producción, y que ocurre con sus precios? </li></ul>
    22. 22. Los factores de producción <ul><li>Se clasifican en: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tierra : recurso productivo proporcionado por la naturaleza </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trabajo : realizado por los seres humanos. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Capita físico : consiste en productos manufacturados tales como edificios y máquinas. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Capita humano : es la mejora en el factor trabajo gracias a ala educación y el conocimiento que están incorporados a la fuerza laboral. </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Importancia de los precios de los factores: la asignación de los recursos. <ul><li>Los mercados de los factores y los precio de los mismos juegan un papel crucial en uno de los procesos más importantes que deben producirse en cualquier economía: la asignación de recursos entre los distintos productores. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Demanda derivada: La demanda en un mercado de factores se deriva de la elección del nivel de producción de la empresa. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Los mercados de factores son la fuente, para la mayoría de nosotros, de la parte más importante de nuestra renta. </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Mercado de factores y distribución de la renta <ul><li>La distribución de la renta entre factores es el reparto de la renta total entre trabajadores, tierra y capital. </li></ul><ul><li>El precio de los factores de producción tiene un impacto muy significativo en el reparto del “pastel” económico o distribución de la renta entre grupos diferentes. </li></ul><ul><li>A lo largo de los siglos ha variado significativamente la distribución de la renta entre factores: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Antes de la revolución industrial el factor tierra era el que tenía mayor peso en la distribución de las rentas (economías fundamentalmente agrícolas) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Le toma el relevo las rentas del capital. </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. La productividad marginal y la demanda de factores. <ul><li>Todas las decisiones económicas se basan en la comparación de costes e ingresos; y generalmente en la comparación de los costes marginales y los ingresos marginales. </li></ul><ul><li>Esto le ocurre al productor que decide si contratar a un trabajador adicional: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>El coste marginal del trabajador será su salario. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>¿Pero cual es su ingreso marginal? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Utilizaremos la función de producción que relaciona los inputs con los outputs para contestar a dicha pregunta. </li></ul><ul><li>Veremos como los productores son precio-aceptantes- operan en mercados perfectamente competitivos. </li></ul>
    26. 26. La función de producción en la granja de Jorge y Marta PMgT 7 8 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 19 17 15 13 11 9 7 5 Producto marginal del trabajo (fanegas por trabajador) 7 8 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 100 80 60 40 20 Cantidad de trigo (fanegas) (a) Producto total (b) Producto marginal del trabajo PT Cantidad de trabajo (trabajadores) Cantidad de trabajo (trabajadores)
    27. 27. El valor del producto marginal <ul><li>Una empresa precio-aceptante maximiza sus beneficios si produce el volumen de producto para el cual el coste marginal de la última unidad producida es igual a precio de mercado </li></ul><ul><li>Una vez determinada la cantidad óptima de producto, podemos volver a la función de producción y encontrar el número óptimo de trabajadores. </li></ul>
    28. 28. El valor del producto marginal <ul><li>El valor del producto marginal de un factor es el valor de la producción adicional generada por una unidad adicional de ese factor. </li></ul><ul><li>Valor del producto marginal del trabajo = </li></ul><ul><li>VPMgT = P × PM </li></ul><ul><li>Si el valor de producción extra es superior al coste del trabajador, es decir si VPMgT>Salario, el productor contratará a este nuevo trabajador. </li></ul><ul><li>Para maximizar el beneficio, el productor contratará trabajadores hasta el punto en el cual, para el último trabajador contratado: </li></ul><ul><li>VPTMg=S </li></ul>
    29. 29. El valor del producto marginal Cantidad de trabajo L (obreros) Cantidad de Trigo Q (quintal) Producto Marginal del trabajo PMgL =  Q /  L (quintal por obrero) Empleo y producción de la granja de Jorge y Marta
    30. 30. Curva del valor del producto marginal <ul><li>La curva del valor del producto marginal de un factor muestra cómo el valor del producto marginal de dicho factor depende de la cantidad de factor empleada . </li></ul><ul><li>Para maximizar el beneficio, un productor elegirá el nivel de empleo para el cual el valor del producto marginal del trabajo es igual al salario del mercado. </li></ul>
    31. 31. Curva del valor del producto marginal VPMgT A 0 1 2 3 4 8 7 6 5 $400 300 200 100 Salario, Valor del producto marginal del trabajo Número de trabajadores que maximiza el beneficio Punto óptimo Salario de mercado Cantidad de trabajo (trabajadores)
    32. 32. Desplazamientos de la curva de demanda de un factor. <ul><li>¿Qué origina desplazamientos de las curvas de demanda de un factor? </li></ul><ul><li>Hay tres causa fundamentales: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cambios en los precios de los bienes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cambios en la oferta de otros factores </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cambios en la tecnología. </li></ul></ul>
    33. 33. Desplazamientos de la curva de demanda de un factor. A B 2 0 8 5 $200 VPMgT 1 VPMgT 2 A C 0 5 $200 VPMgT 3 VPMgT 1 (a) Un aumento en el precio del trigo (b) Una caída en el precio del trigo Cantidad de trabajo (trabajadores) Cantidad de trabajo (trabajadores) Salario Salario Salario de mercado
    34. 34. <ul><li>Cambios en la oferta de otros factores: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Si Jorge y Marta adquieren más terreno, cada trabajador producirá más trigo, porqué tiene más terreno en el que trabajar. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>El producto marginal del trabajo en la granja aumentaría para cualquier nivel de empleo. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Esto tendría el mismo efecto que un aumento en el precio del trigo. </li></ul></ul>Desplazamientos de la curva de demanda de un factor.
    35. 35. <ul><li>Cambios en la tecnología: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>El efecto del progreso tecnológico sobre la demanda de cualquier factor puede ir en cualquier dirección: puede aumentar o disminuir su demanda. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ejemplo disminución de demanda: el desarrollo de sustitutivos para la energía del caballo, como los automóviles o los tractores, redujo fuertemente la demanda de caballos. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>El efecto habitual del progreso tecnológico, no obstante, es un incremento en la demanda de factores. La nueva tecnología crea nuevos productos que demandan más factores. </li></ul></ul>Desplazamientos de la curva de demanda de un factor.
    36. 36. La teoría de la productividad marginal de la distribución de la renta <ul><li>Hemos aprendido que cuando el mercado de bienes y servicios y el mercado de factores son perfectamente competitivos, los factores de producción serán empleados hasta el punto en el que el valor marginal del producto sea igual a su precio. (Ej. Alquiler de la tierra) </li></ul><ul><li>¿Qué dice esto en relación a la distribución de la renta entre factores? </li></ul>
    37. 37. Todos los productores se enfrentan al mismo salario 5 0 $200 Salario Salario de mercado 7 $200 VPMT trigo VPMT maíz VPMT de Jones = P x PMT = P maíz x PMT maíz (a) El granjero Jones (b) El granjero Smith Número óptimo de trabajadores VPMT de Smith trigo trigo Salario Cantidad de trabajo (trabajadores) Cantidad de trabajo (trabajadores) Número óptimo de trabajadores
    38. 38. Equilibrio en el mercado de trabajo <ul><li>Cada empresa contratará trabajadores hasta el punto en que el valor del producto marginal del trabajo es igual al salario de equilibrio. </li></ul><ul><li>Esto significa que, en equilibrio, el valor del producto marginal del trabajo será el mismo para todos los empresarios. </li></ul><ul><li>Por tanto el salario de equilibrio o de mercado es igual al valor del producto marginal del trabajo en el equilibrio, no importa dónde se contrata esta última unidad, ya que el VPMT es igual para todos los empresario. </li></ul><ul><li>Lo mismo es cierto para cada factor de producción: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>El precio de mercado de cada factor es igual a su valor del producto marginal en equilibrio : es la teoría de la productividad marginal de la distribución de la renta. </li></ul></ul>
    39. 39. Equilibrio en el mercado de trabajo Curva de oferta de trabajo del mercado E Curva de demanda de trabajo del mercado L* W* Nivel de empleo de equilibrio Valor del producto marginal del trabajo en el equilibrio Cantidad de trabajo (trabajadores) Salario
    40. 40. Equilibrio en el mercado de la tierra y del capital. Cantidad (a) El mercado de la tierra Cantidad (b) El mercado del capital Renta D Tierra R* Capital O Capital O Tierra D Capital Q* Tierra Q* Capital R* Tierra Alquiler
    41. 41. Es cierta la teoría de la productividad marginal de la distribución de la renta? <ul><li>Dos objeciones fundamentales a dicha teoría: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>¿Las diferencias salariales realmente reflejan diferencias en la productividad marginal, o hay algo más? (Ej. Salarios hombres, mujeres, entre razas…) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>¿Es justa la distribución de la renta que explica la teoría de la productividad marginal? </li></ul></ul>
    42. 42. Media de las ganancias por sexo y etnia 2002 en USA Hispanos (hombres y mujeres) Afroamericanos (hombres y mujeres) Mujeres (todas las etnias) $45,722 $27,337 $24,893 $29,166 45,000 $50,000 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 Hombres blancos Remuneración anual media 2006
    43. 43. La productividad marginal y la desigualdad salarial <ul><li>Hay tres fuentes bien fundamentadas de diferencias salariales entre distintas ocupaciones y distintos individuos: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Diferenciales compensatorios: son diferencias salariales entre trabajos que reflejan el hecho de que algunos trabajos son menos agradables que otros. Pero para un trabajo dado, la teoría de la productividad marginal de distribución de la renta si se verifica. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diferencias en talento. No todos tenemos la habilidad futbolística de Messi. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cantidad de Capital Humano : Formación y experiencia. </li></ul></ul>
    44. 44. Diferencias salariales por educación, sexo y etnia. Hombres blancos $70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Remuneración anual media 2006 Mujeres blancas Hombres afro-americanos Sin bachillerato Bachillerato Título universitario Mujeres afro-americanas Hombres hispanos Mujeres hispanas
    45. 45. Productividad marginal y desigualdad salarial <ul><li>El poder del mercado: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Una fuente indudable de diferencias salariales entre trabajadores que de otro modo serían similares es el papel de los sindicatos </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Los sindicatos son organizaciones de trabajadores que intentan elevar los salarios y mejorar las condiciones laborales de sus miembros. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ello conduce a mejores condiciones para aquellos trabajadores representados por sindicatos. </li></ul></ul>
    46. 46. Productividad Marginal y desigualdad salarial <ul><li>El modelo de Salarios de eficiencia: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Algunos empresarios pagan un salario por encima del de equilibrio como incentivo para obtener un mejor comportamiento del trabajador. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>La discriminación ha sido el mayor factor de desigualdad económica. Pero las fuerzas del mercado tienden a actuar en contra de la discriminación. </li></ul><ul><li>Las interferencias en el mercado (como los sindicatos o las leyes del salario mínimo) o los fallos del mercado (como los salarios de eficiencia) pueden conducir a salarios que están por encima de sus niveles de equilibrio. En estos casos hay más solicitantes que empleos: lo que permite a los empresarios discriminar entre los candidatos. </li></ul>
    47. 47. Entonces ¿Funciona la teoría de la productividad marginal? <ul><li>La principal conclusión que deberíamos extraer de esta discusión es que la teoría de la productividad marginal no es una descripción perfecta de cómo se determinan las rentas de los factores, pero funciona bastante bien. </li></ul><ul><li>Es importante poner énfasis, que esto no significa que la distribución de la renta entre los factores esté moralmente justificada. </li></ul><ul><li>(La economía del apartheid) </li></ul>
    48. 48. La oferta de trabajo <ul><li>Las decisiones sobre la oferta de trabajo resultan de decisiones sobre la asignación del tiempo: cuántas horas emplear en distintas actividades. </li></ul><ul><li>El ocio es el tiempo disponible para actividades distintas a la de ganar dinero destinado a comprar bienes en el mercado. </li></ul><ul><li>En la elección óptima de oferta de trabajo de un indivíduo, la utilidad marginal de una hora de ocio es igual a la utilidad marginal que obtiene de los bienes que puede comprar con el salario que percibe en una hora. </li></ul><ul><li>La curva de oferta de trabajo individual muestra cómo la cantidad de trabajo ofertada por un individuo depende de su salario. </li></ul>
    49. 49. La oferta de trabajo <ul><li>Un incremento en el salario causa un efecto renta y un efecto substitución en la oferta individual de trabajo en direcciones opuestas. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>El efecto sustitución hará que el individuo trabaje más horas : aumenta el coste de oportunidad del ocio ( la cantidad de dinero que deja de ganar por gastar una hora más de ocio) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pero el efecto renta (gana más dinero en menos horas) hará posible que gaste lo mismo que gastaba trabajando menos tiempo. </li></ul></ul>
    50. 50. Curva de oferta de trabajo individual 50 40 0 $20 10 40 0 $20 10 30 (a) Domina el efecto sustitución Cantidad de trabajo (horas) (b) Domina el efecto renta Salario Salario Cantidad de trabajo (horas)
    51. 51. Desplazamientos de la curva de oferta <ul><li>La curva de oferta total del mercado laboral es la suma horizontal de las curvas de oferta individuales. </li></ul><ul><li>La curva se desplaza por cuatro razones: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cambios en las preferencias y normas sociales </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cambios en la población </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cambios en las oportunidades </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cambios en la riqueza. </li></ul></ul>
    52. 52. Gracias.

    ×