PTA Workshop for Parents

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An innovative and FRESH approach to helping young people to "Learn HOW ro learn" and ENJOY the experience

An innovative and FRESH approach to helping young people to "Learn HOW ro learn" and ENJOY the experience

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  • Opening
  • Convince yourself that you do have a good memory that will improve. Too many people get stuck here and convince themselves that their memory is bad, that they are just not good with names, that numbers just slip out of their minds for some reason. Erase those thoughts and vow to improve your memory. Celebrate even little achievements to keep yourself motivated.Memory is best practiced through association. The reason that most of us can't remember our friend's phone number is because 535-3473 just a string of numbers that have no obvious connection to your friend. In order to use your memory efficiently, the best way is to actively create an association for things you're trying to remember. For example, write out your friend's phone number: five three five three four seven three. Now try to create a clever phrase that starts with the first letter of those words: fairy tales feel true for some time. You're now much more likely to remember that phone number. Alternatively, you could create a story that involves 5 characters buying 3 things and doing 5 more things with them... Use your imagination. The point is that you want to connect the phone number to something else. Throwing your best friend as a character in the story would be a good idea too.Association also works if you created vivid, memorable images. You remember information more easily if you can visualize it. If you want to associate a child with a book, try not to visualize the child reading the book -- that's too simple and forgettable. Instead, come up with something more jarring, something that sticks, like the book chasing the child, or the child eating the book. It's your mind -– make the images as shocking and emotional as possible to keep the associations strong.Group information together to help you remember them; this is called chunking. Random lists of things (a shopping list, for example) can be especially difficult to remember. To make it easier, try categorizing the individual things from the list. If you can remember that, among other things, you wanted to buy four different kinds of vegetables, you’ll find it easier to remember all four. Another example: you probably won't remember 17761812184818651898, but try putting a space after every fourth number. Now you can see that those numbers are years, and you can pick key events from each year to help you remember the string of numbers (e.g., Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Mexican-American War, Civil War, Spanish-American War).Repeat information you're trying to memorize to yourself every few days or so. This is called spaced repetition learning. We are more likely to remember more recent things and things that we've experienced with greater frequency[2], so repeating associations and mnemonics to yourself is a good idea. Start practicing every day, and you can gradually decrease the frequency until you remember it naturally.Flash cards are especially useful for studying. It's essentially a card with a question on one side and the answer on the other. (You can also put two things you want to associate on opposite sides of a flashcard.) In the course of learning a topic, you would have a stack of cards and would go through them testing yourself. Those that you got right you would put to one side and review a few days later. The more difficult ones might take several days to fix in the brain. However, how do you determine the ideal time to review the cards that you have temporarily remembered? Leave it too long and, like all memories, it may have faded and we forget the answer. If we review it too soon then we waste time looking at it. We need some system to know exactly when to review each card. This is where "Spaced Repetition Software" comes in. This software automatically works out the most efficient time to test you on each card for optimum memory retention. There are a number of free bits of software out there for you to use.Cramming only works to put information in your short-term memory. You may remember the information for your exam the next day, but you will barely recall the unit when it's time to take the final. Spacing out your studying is important because it gives your brain time to encode the information and store it in your long-term memory.Organize your life. Keep items that you frequently need, such as keys and eyeglasses, in the same place every time. Use an electronic organizer or daily planner to keep track of appointments, due dates for bills, and other tasks. Keep phone numbers and addresses in an address book or enter them into your computer or cell phone. Improved organization can help free up your powers of concentration so that you can remember less routine things. Even if being organized doesn’t improve your memory, you’ll receive a lot of the same benefits (i.e. you won’t have to search for your keys anymore).When it's time to study or remember something new, switch your breathing pattern to be slower and deeper. Deeper and slower breathing actually changes the way your brain works, by inducing the brain's electrical pulses to switch to Theta waves. Theta waves normally occur in your brain in hypnogogic sleep. This is the stage of sleep when outside noises like an alarm clock can influence dreaming. It turns out being in this stage also can aid memory. A good example is the tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon, when information you've been trying to think of all day suddenly comes back to you after napping or waking up from sleep. To activate your Theta waves, switch your breathing to your lower abdomen - in other words, start breathing deeply from your stomach. Consciously slow your rate of breathing too. After a few moments, you should feel calmer, the Theta waves should be flowing in your brain, and you should be more receptive to remembering new information.
  • Exercise your brain. Regularly "exercising" the brain keeps it growing and spurs the development of new nerve connections that can help improve memory. By developing new mental skills -- especially complex ones such as learning a new language or learning to play a new musical instrument -- and challenging your brain with puzzles and games, you can keep your brain active and improve its physiological functioning. Try some fun puzzle exercises everyday such as crosswords, Sudoku, and other games which are easy enough to for anyone.Exercise daily. Regular aerobic exercise improves circulation and efficiency throughout the body -- including the brain -- and can help ward off the memory loss that comes with aging. Exercise also makes you more alert and relaxed, and can thereby improve your memory uptake, allowing you to take better mental "pictures".Reduce stress. Chronic stress does in fact physically damage the brain, it can make remembering much more difficult. After prolonged stress, the brain will start to become affected and deteriorate.Stressful situations are recognized by the hypothalamus, which in turn signals the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland then secretes adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH) which influences the adrenal glands to secrete adrenaline and later, cortisol (corticosteroids). The corticosteroids can weaken the blood-brain barrier and damage the hippocampus (the memory center). Ironically, the hippocampus controls the secretion of the hormone released by the hypothalamus through a process of negative feedback. After chronic stress, it will begin to deteriorate and will not be as efficient in regulating the degenerative corticosteroids, impairing memory. Neurogenesis (formation of new neurons) indeed exists in the hippocampus, but stress inhibits it.Realistically speaking, stress may never be completely eliminated from one's life, but it definitely can be controlled. Even temporary stresses can make it more difficult to effectively focus on concepts and observe things. Try to relax, regularly practice yoga or other stretching exercises, and see a doctor if you have severe chronic stress as soon as possible.Eat well and eat right. There are a lot of herbal supplements on the market that claim to improve memory, but none have yet been shown to be effective in clinical tests (although small studies have shown some promising results for ginkgo biloba and phosphatidylserine). A healthy diet, however, contributes to a healthy brain, and foods containing antioxidants -- broccoli, blueberries, spinach, and berries, for example -- and Omega-3 fatty acids appear to promote healthy brain functioning.Feed your brain with such supplements as Thiamine, Niacin and Vitamin B-6.Grazing, or eating 5 or 6 small meals throughout the day instead of 3 large meals, also seems to improve mental functioning (including memory) by limiting dips in blood sugar, which may negatively affect the brain. Make sure it's healthy stuff.Give yourself time to form a memory. Memories are very fragile in the short-term, and distractions can make you quickly forget something as simple as a phone number. The key to avoid losing memories before you can even form them is to be able to focus on the thing to be remembered for a while without thinking about other things, so when you’re trying to remember something, avoid distractions and complicated tasks for a few minutes.7Sleep well. The amount of sleep we get affects the brain's ability to recall recently learned information. Getting a good night's sleep -- a minimum of seven hours a night -- may improve your short-term memory and long-term relational memory, according to recent studies conducted at the Harvard Medical School.8Build your memorization arsenal. Memory pegs, memory palaces, and the Dominic System are just some techniques which form the foundation for mnemonic techniques, and which can visibly improve your memory. Memory pegs involve visualization methods in which you make use of various familiar landmarks, associating the to be learnt information to these various popular landmarks. This helps to trigger and enhance the memory process.9Venture out and learn from your mistakes. Go ahead and take a stab at memorizing the first one hundred digits of pi, or, if you've done that already, the first one thousand.Memorize the monarchs of England through your memory palaces, or your grocery list through visualization. Through diligent effort you will eventually master the art of memorization.
  • How quickly can you read now?Take 2 – 3 seconds on each page to scan the titlesJust get a snapshot of what is coming aheadThat way, your brain will know where to fill in the gapsTake your finger and put it under the words as you readThis is to stop our brain wanting to go back on a lineThat just wastes timeLet us get into the heart of it.Your eyes tend to scan the periphery, so you look at the BLANK Left & Right marginsFocus on the RED word in from LEFT – and the RED word in from the RIGHTFollow this process through each lineStart off very, very slowlyCheck your speed a bit later again – should have improvedGOAL – try the THIRD word in….etc

Transcript

  • 1. LEARNING HOW TO LEARNOUR ABILITY TO LEARN IS CONTROLLED BY THE FOLLOWING FACTORS: • OUR SELF-IMAGE • NUMBERACY SKILLS • MEMORY FACULTY • READING INTELLIGENTLY • CONSOLIDATION & USE OF ALL THESE
  • 2. SELF-IMAGEREADINGNUMERACYMEMORY
  • 3. JUST ONELEGMISSINGFROM:• YOUR SELF-IMAGE• NUMERACY ABILITY• MEMORY SKILLS• READING SPEED ?
  • 4. WITH ONE LEG MISSING,YOUR LIFE JUST FALLS APART!
  • 5. SELF- IMAGEMODULE
  • 6. NOW…..WHAT IS YOUR SELF-IMAGE ALL ABOUT? IS IT A SENSE OF FAILURE? WHICH CAN LEAD TO:• FRUSTRATION• AGGRESSIVENESS• INSECURITY• LONELINESS• UNCERTAINTY• RESENTMENT• EMPTINESS
  • 7. HOWEVER, A GOOD SELF-IMAGECAN BRING SUCCESS, BECAUSE:• SENSE OF DIRECTION• UNDERSTANDING• COURAGE• CHARITY• ESTEEM• SELF-CONFIDENCE• SELF-ACCEPTANCE
  • 8. SELF FULFILLED PEOPLE• SEE THEMSELVES AS LIKED, AND WANTED• THEY HAVE A HIGH DEGREE OF SELF-ACCEPTANCE• THEY HAVE FEELING OF AFFINITY WITH OTHERS• THEY ARE A RICH STORE OF INFORMATION AND KNOWLEDGE• THEY DON’T TALK DOWN TO OTHERS• THEY HAVE A SENSE OF INTEGRITY
  • 9. ALL HUMANS HAVE JUST 6 BASIC NEEDS• A NEED FOR LOVE• A NEED FOR SECURITY• A NEED FOR CREATIVE EXPRESSION• A NEED FOR RECOGNITION• A NEED NEW EXPERIENCES• A NEED FOR SELF-ESTEEM• A NEED FOR MORE YEARS AND MORE LIFE
  • 10. HOW CAN WE CAN ACHIEVE THE OTHER 3 PILLARS OF PERSONAL SUCCESS? •MATHS ABILITY •MEMORY SKILLS•LOVE OF READING
  • 11. MATHSMODULE
  • 12. YOU CAN HAVE SKILL WITH NUMBERS
  • 13. YOUR NAME IN NUMEROLOGY1 AJS Numbers tell a story. In fact, you2 BKT can learn more about a person3 CLU through their numerology profile than you would with4 DMV hours of interview. By knowing5 ENW the meaning of numbers in6 FOX numerology, you not only give7 GPY yourself a view into person’s8 HQZ personality, but you will also be privy to their conscious and9 I R unconscious desires in life.
  • 14. MEANING OF NUMBERS• 1= Leadership, highly intelligent, stubborn• 2= Reserved, spiritual, cooperative, shy• 3= Expressive, creative, friendly, fickle• 4= Reliable, constant, hard working, jealous• 5= Free Spirit, maverick, versatile, impulsive• 6= Peacemaker, sympathetic, charming, vain• 7= Intellectual, Spiritual, Intuitive, Moody• 8= Charitable, wise, successful, Power seeker• 9= Adventurous, Romantic, Philosophical, Wasteful
  • 15. C O L I N 3 6 3 9 5Expressive Free Spiritcreativefriendlyfickle 8 Maverick Versatile impulsive CHARITABLE, WISE, SUCCESSFUL, POWER SEEKER
  • 16. Colin Dovey Life & Business Coach OFCHIRON CONCEPTS CONSULTING presents LEARNING HOW TO LEARN Web Site: www.teensuccess.co.za E-Mail: lifecoaching@polka.co.za
  • 17. DR KAWASHIMA EXERCISE - PRACTICE• 5X3 • 6+6 • 4-3 • 7+6 • 8+6• 8-1 • 14-5 • 9+8 • 13-4 • 6X7• 3+6 • 2X9 • 15-6 • 8+2 • 9-4• 8X4 • 17-9 • 8+1 • 10-7 • 5X6• 7+5 • 4X5 • 6X8 • 5X2 • 3+1• 9-8 • 7+4 • 9-5 • 8-3 • 10-9• 5+4• 3X4 • 2+5 • 2X3 • 9X7 • 6+9• 1X7 • 7-2 • 18-9 • 3+5 • 4+5• 8+7 • 9X8 • 2X5 • 13-5 • 8X9
  • 18. WORD MEMORISATION – 2 MINSSEA BACK ART HILL POUNDCATCH SENSE FATHER WOOD AFTERNOONGUEST DESIGN STORAGE COAT WEBRECORD PLANT NEIGHBOUR STAR LINESTEST MEAL DOCTOR PRODUCT SPEED
  • 19. STROOP TEST
  • 20. KIMS GAMEThis game develops a persons capacity to observe and remember details.
  • 21. DON’T SLOW ME DOWN WITH THAT CALCULATOR
  • 22. MULTIPLYING NUMBERS CLOSE TO 100 BOTH NUMBERS < 100? +6 +2 6X2 94 X 98 = 9212
  • 23. MULTIPLYING NUMBERS CLOSE TO 100 NUMBERS ABOVE & BELOW 100 +7 -2 93 X 102 = 9500 93 – (-2) OR 9500 102 – (+7) 7 x (-2) - 14 9486
  • 24. MULTIPLYING BY 9 WE WILL USE THE NUMBER 230 USE 10 FOR NOW230 X 9 = 230023 = -230 2070
  • 25. PRODUCT OF TWO 1 DIGIT NUMBERS > 5 WHAT IS 7 X 9 = ? THEN 6 X 8 =?ASK YOURSELF: A) HOW MUCH IS EACH NUMBER > 5? B) HOW MUCH IS EACH RESULT < 5 ? A B____ A B 7: +2 3 6: +1 4 9: +4 1 8: +3 2 6 3 X 4 8 X 63 48
  • 26. LONG LIST ADDITIONADD THE FOLLOWING NUMBERS AS QUICKLY AS YOU CAN: FIRST FIND THE “CHECK NUMBER” (80)97 77 97 + 17 77 - 386 81 86 + 6 81 + 183 70 83 + 3 70 - 1095 85 95 + 15 85 + 585 84 85 + 5 84 + 470 76 70 -10 76 - 484 66 84 + 4 66 - 1472 80 72 -8 80 0 +50 -18 +10 -31 +32 - 21 = +11 16 X 80 = 1280 + 11 = 1291 16 X 80 = ((4 X 80 = 320) X 4) = 1280 + ((50 + 10) – (18 -31) = 1291
  • 27. MEMORYMODULE
  • 28. ACROSS1. Yet (4,3,4)7. The Postal System (4)8. Not complete of Total (7)9. Frozen Water (3)10. To Flood (5)11. Military Trainees (6)13. Suffer Grief (6)16. Greek Letter (5)18. Assistance (3)19. Small falcon (7)20. Dutch Cheese (4)21. For keeps (11)DOWN1. ……….Lumley, actress (6)2. Cricket bat part (6)3. Thin candles (6)4. Noblemen (5)5. Excite or trouble (7)6. Surpass (7)11. To record or register (5,2)12. Kitchen furniture (7)13. Goalkeeper, informally (6)14. Place in from the margin (6)15. Whim (6)17. Major Artery (5)
  • 29. ACROSS1. Yet (4,3,4)7. The Postal System (4)8. Not complete of Total (7)9. Frozen Water (3)10. To Flood (5)11. Military Trainees (6)13. Suffer Grief (6)16. Greek Letter (5)18. Assistance (3)19. Small falcon (7)20. Dutch Cheese (4)21. For keeps (11)DOWN1. ……….Lumley, actress (6)2. Cricket bat part (6)3. Thin candles (6)4. Noblemen (5)5. Excite or trouble (7)6. Surpass (7)11. To record or register (5,2)12. Kitchen furniture (7)13. Goalkeeper, informally (6)14. Place in from the margin (6)15. Whim (6)17. Major Artery (5)
  • 30. TARGET WORDSSEE HOW MANY WORDS OF FOUR LETTERSOR MORE YOU CAN MAKE FROM THELETTERS SHOWN ON THE RIGHT.IN MAKING A WORD, EACH LETTER MAYBE USED ONCE ONLY. EACH MUSTCONTAIN THE CENTRE LETTER AND THEREMUST BE AT LEAST ONE NINE-LETTERWORD.NO PLURALS OR VERB FORMS ENDING IN“S”, NO WORDS WITH INITIAL CAPITALS AND TARGETNO WORDS WITH A HYPHEN ORAPOSTROPHE PERMITTED. GOOD = 22THE FIRST WORD OF A PHRASE ISPERMITTED (e.g. INKJET in INKJET PRINTER) VERY GOOD = 33 EXCELLENT = 44 +
  • 31. TARGET WORDS - ANSWERSDEEM, DEMO, DEMOTE, DOME, DORM, EMOTE,EMOTED, MEET, MERE, METE, METED, METEOR,METER, METERED, METRE, METRO, MODE,MOPE, MOPED, MORE, MOTE, PEDOMETER,PERM, PERMED, POEM, POME, PREMED,PROME, PROM, REDEEM, REMOTE, ROMP,ROMPED, TEEM, TEEMED, TEMP, TEMPED,TEMPER, TEMPERED, TEMPO, TERM, TERMED,TOME, TROMPE
  • 32. DEVELOPING A KILLER MEMORY• IMAGE MEMORY BETTER THEN FACT MEMORY• DRAW A PICTURE IN YOUR MIND• IMAGINE BIG OBJECTS IN FAMILIAR PLACES
  • 33. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT• LONDON TAXI DRIVERS (“THE KNOWLEDGE”)• REMEMBERING LONG PHONE NUMBERS• NO “TO DO” LIST – MAKE A SYSTEM
  • 34. MEMORY CONFIDENCE• BELIEVE YOU CAN REMEMBER• ANCIENTS HAD NO PAPER AND PENS
  • 35. KEEP IT ODD!• YOU NEED TO PRACTICE DAILY• RIGHT HAND WATCH TECHNIQUE
  • 36. EXERCISE YOUR MEMORY• PLAY MEMORY GAMES• DO IT REGULARLY
  • 37. SECRETS OF A MENTAL FILING SYSTEM THAT WORKS YOU WERE NOT BORN WITH A POOR MEMORY. REMEMBERING IS A PROCESSSED THAT MUST BE LEARNED. JUST LIKE YOU LEARNED TO WALK, TALK, EAT, TELLING COLOURS APART, DISTINGUISHING SOUNDS, AND TELLING TIME. YOU LEARNED THOSE AS A CHILD, AND NOW YOU DO THEM WITHOUT THINKING. WAKING UP YOUR MEMORY BANKS IS THE SAME PROCESS.
  • 38. SECRETS OF A MENTAL FILING SYSTEM THAT WORKS• Convince yourself that you do have a good memory that will improve• Memory is best practiced through association.• Association also works if you created vivid, memorable images.• Group information together to help you remember them; this is called chunking.• Repeat information youre trying to memorise to yourself every few days or so.• Organise Your Life• When its time to study or remember something new, switch your breathing pattern to be slower and deeper.
  • 39. SECRETS OF A MENTAL FILING SYSTEM THAT WORKS• Exercise your brain.• Exercise yourself daily.• Reduce stress.• Eat well and eat right.• Take better pictures.• Give yourself time to form a memory.• Sleep well.• Build your memorization arsenal. (e.g. Dominic System)• Venture out and learn from your mistakes.
  • 40. Memory System by numbers ZERO = ONE = TWO = SNOW SUN SHOETHREE = FOUR = FIVE =SEA DOOR HIVE
  • 41. Memory System by numbers SIX = SEVEN = STICKS HEAVEN EIGHT = GATENINE =MINE
  • 42. Quickly Memorize Lists Using the Loci Method• use the visualisation of familiar locations to memorise a series of items, whether it be a grocery list or a series of talking points in a speech.• Use a location very familiar to you, such as your home, and visualise yourself following a common path through that location (such as the front door of your house to the back), seeing the items you need to memorise in those locations.
  • 43. Quickly Memorize ListsUsing the Loci Method
  • 44. SIGHT MEMORY WARSOUNDTOUCHSMELLTASTE
  • 45. READINGMODULE
  • 46. READING REVOLUTION - AT SPEEDHaving a great memory is one of the most important skills that anystudent should learn, but very rarely is this crucial skill taught inschools today. People are often told that they either have it or theydon’t. Nothing could be further from the truth. Memory, likeeverything else, is a skill that can dramatically improved by using theright techniques. If you, or your child has a good memory, it can bedramatically improved upon to recall information. Some parents andeducators feel that teaching children how to memorise is a uselessskill. DO NOT BELIEVE THAT FOR ONE SECOND. You can readabout why memory is even more important today than in previousdecades. There are several factors that can lead to dramaticallyimproving your child’s memory. We NEED to learn how to make theinformation we assimilate get “grooved” into our psyche…and it is OK..
  • 47. HOMEWORK MODULE
  • 48. HOMEWORK HONCHO1 GET ORGANISED• Keep homework supplies close at hand.• Avoid digging through drawers.• Create a cache of homework supplies• Keep it close to where your child works.• Dedicate a desk drawer, OR box, with often-used items.• Supply list provided by the teacher is a great resource.• Use the list on the next page as a starting point.
  • 49. SUPPLIES• Pens, pencils, • Stapler, paper clips, erasers, tape• pencil sharpener • Sticky notes• Paper (lined and • Dictionary and blank) thesaurus• Glue stick • Calculator• Highlighter pens • Scissors, hole punch
  • 50. OPTIMISE THE ENVIRONMENT• Be flexible about your child’s study place.• Not every child works best sitting at a desk in a silent room.• Ask your child how he likes to study—lying on the floor, sitting on his bed with a lap desk, or at the kitchen table amidst the bustle of dinner preparations.• Some kids like background noise; others prefer quiet. While television is almost always a distraction, music is welcome white noise to many kids.• Your child’s favourite study environment might change as he grows and may vary depending upon the type of work.• The key is to be flexible while ensuring that homework is completed.
  • 51. CLEAR AWAY CLUTTER• Set aside everything not related to the task at hand.• When your child comes home in a panic because of homework assignments in multiple subjects, ease her overwhelmed feeling by helping her focus on one thing at a time.• Review everything that needs to be done and choose one assignment to start with.• Gather and organize the materials needed to complete the chosen task and set everything else aside until it’s time to tackle the next assignment.
  • 52. USE A PLANNER• Use a homework planner to record assignments.• Teach him/her to record each assignment as it is given.• He/She should review the sheet at the end of each day and make sure the needed materials are in his book bag.
  • 53. ASSIGNMENT SHEET INFORMATION• Date assigned• Subject: math, book report• Assignment: book title, pages to read, problems to solve, etc.)• Project components: answer review questions, write a paragraph on what you find most Interesting)• Date due• Date completed
  • 54. BOOKMARK IT • Save links to useful reference sites on the Internet. The Internet is full of helpful “homework help” websites. These sites, divided by subject, can help your child with tricky assignments and research projects. • Another benefit: in order to find the right information, your child must first understand what she needs to know, and that’s the first step toward solving a problem. • Save the addresses of a few of these sites in the “Favourites” file of your web browser. • LINK to Homework Spot web site: goo.gl/gVy83http://www.discoveryeducation.com/students/index.cfm?campaign=DE&CFID=3514115&CFTOKEN=74330201
  • 55. BUILD A LIBRARYHome Library Collection• Age-appropriate children’s dictionary and standarddictionary• Encyclopedia: There are excellent versions in print and onCD-ROM. Ask your child’s teacher or a librarian for theirrecommendation• Thesaurus: Print versions are generally morecomprehensive than the thesaurus built into wordprocessing programs• Atlas: Make sure it is up-to-date• Almanac: This reference should also be kept current• Foreign language dictionary: For kids studying languages
  • 56. STICK TO A SCHEDULE• Schedule time for homework every day—and stick to it.• When school starts each YEAR, schedule homework into your family’s daily routine• With your child, agree on a specific time period for doing homework, including some weekend time.• Even when there are no assignments to complete, adhere to the schedule by using homework time for review or reading.
  • 57. EASE INTO IT• Avoid an abrupt transition from playtime to homework.• It can be hard for kids to switch from playing or other pleasurable activities to concentrating on homework.• Make the transition easier by giving your child a small task before she settles down to work.• Assigning a job she usually does without a fuss creates a more gradual shift from play to homework and puts your child in a “work” frame of mind.
  • 58. GET OFF TO A GOOD START• Help your child get started with homework, then back off.• If your child is unsure about an assignment, set him on the right track by sitting together and reviewing the instructions.• Check his understanding by having him explain how he will proceed, then stay close by while he answers the first few questions.• With his confidence built, you can back off and let him complete the rest of the assignment on his own.
  • 59. KEEP THINGS IN ORDER• Tackle assignments in the best sequence for your child.• When your child has several homework assignments, some she can breeze through and others that take more effort, which should she tackle first?• That depends on your child and on the particular mix of assignments. Starting with easier work and moving toward the more challenging builds your child’s confidence.• On the other hand, getting the tough stuff done first lets her breathe a sigh of relief.• Try both approaches to see which works best. But don’t be afraid to mix it up—if she’s frustrated with a tricky assignment, suggest she set it aside in favour of something easier.• She’ll return to the challenging assignment refreshed and with renewed determination.
  • 60. TAKE TIME OUT• Set a timer to pace homework sessions.• If your child has difficulty focusing on homework long enough to complete it in one sitting, use a kitchen timer to set agreed-upon study and break times.• Work together to estimate the total work time needed, and then break the total into smaller chunks.• Thirty minutes of math homework might be broken into two 15-minute work periods with a five-minute stretching or snack break.• Adjust the work and break intervals to suit your child’s age, temperament, and the intensity of the homework.
  • 61. PLAN FOR THE LONG HAUL• Set intermediate goals for long-term projects.• Make long-term projects manageable by helping your child break the project into smaller goals.• Set a target for when each goal will be met, leading to completion of the entire project.• This process helps your child focus on a smaller aspect of the assignment, keeps him motivated, and teaches him planning skills.
  • 62. ASK LEADING QUESTIONS• When your child hits a roadblock, ask questions that guide her to the answer.• Rather than giving your child the answer when she’s stuck, ask questions to get her thinking about how to solve the problem on her own.• If she’s stumped by a math problem, look at the last problem she successfully solved. Ask, “What was the first step you took to solve this one?”• Lead her through the steps until the tricky one becomes clear. Your questions will prompt her to take small steps toward breaking a roadblock.
  • 63. BE A ROLE MODEL• Use your child’s homework time to do your own work.• When your child sits down to tackle homework, join him by taking care of your own “homework” at the same time.• Choose chores that are interruptible if your child needs your help and set a good example by not working while watching television.
  • 64. STAY POSITIVE• Let your own upbeat attitude toward learning rub off on your child.• If your child senses that you dread homework sessions, she’ll dread them too.• A positive attitude, particularly when your child is facing a tough assignment, goes a long way toward taking the tedium out of the daily work.• Keep in mind, though, that teachers are sometimes unreasonable in the timing or amount of homework they assign.• Help your child resolve such challenges by asking the school/teacher what their homework policy is.
  • 65. LET GO OF RESPONSIBILITY• Avoid rescuing your child from homework emergencies. All kids, at some point, forget their homework or put it off until it becomes a crisis. When that happens, avoid stepping in to fix things. Instead, guide your child through the steps needed to salvage the situation.• If he’s forgotten his assignments, for example, sit with him while he checks the school’s homework web page or calls a classmate. If an assignment cannot be completed on time, instead of writing a note to the teacher yourself, have your child write it, explaining why the work is late and requesting an extension.• Both of you should sign the note. Letting your child take responsibility for his mistakes gives him valuable problem-solving experience.
  • 66. BE AN ADVISOR• Be available for help as a consultant.• Your child’s homework is hers to do, not yours.• Let her know that you are willing to help but limit yourself to a consultant role. Avoid Evaluating your child’s work unless she specifically requests your opinion.• It’s OK to point out mistakes, but let your child decide whether to correct them. Seeing the errors will help the teacher understand your child’s learning process.
  • 67. CALL IN ASSISTANCE• Recognise when outside help is required.• There may be times when you are not the best person to help your child with homework. If working together leads to frustration, look for outside help. This need not mean costly tutors or joining a homework center.• You could, for example, make a trade with a classmate’s parent: you agree to work with both kids on English assignments if she takes on science.• Or recruit an older sibling or your spouse. It’s better to maintain your relationship as a loving parent than get into a cycle of anger and aggravation over homework.
  • 68. KNOW WHEN TO CALL A HALT• Sometimes you have to say “enough is enough.”• Everyone has his limit, and there may be occasions when your child becomes too tired or frustrated to continue on an assignment.• That’s the time to stop. If possible, your child can return to the assignment later on.• When the work is due the next day, write a note to the teacher explaining that he completed as much as he could. Know when to be your child’s ally and avoid letting homework push him to the brink of a meltdown.
  • 69. KEEP A HOMEWORK HISTORY• File completed assignments for quick reference.• Completed homework assignments are a valuable resource.• Your child can refer to them to check how he solved problems in the past, see progress made in each subject, and detect patterns of errors.• To set up a homework history, create a colour coded file folder for each subject.• File completed assignments in order as his teacher returns them.
  • 70. MAKE THE GRADE• Take the time to review your child’s graded assignments.• Make a point of reviewing your child’s homework assignments after they have been graded and returned by the teacher.• This review is an opportunity to praise work done well and progress made. You will also see trouble spots and areas where extra practice is needed.• When you treat homework as an important part of school and learning, your child will value its importance too.
  • 71. REWARD PROGRESS• Give your child small rewards for reaching goals.• Providing an occasional reward for reaching homework goals can be a great motivator.• When your child faces a particularly difficult assignment, offering an incentive (such as letting her choose the next movie rental) could be just what she needs to get through it. Also consider incentives for longer-term goals like completion of a complicated project.• Rewarding her for hard work is similar to promising yourself, “When I finish painting the back door, I’m going to sit down and read for a while.”
  • 72. TURN YOUR CHILD INTO A TEACHER• Encouraging your child to teach you gives him confidence.• It’s true that teaching others reveals how much you really know. Turn the tables on your child and have him show you how to complete his assignments.• Ask a lot of “how,” “why,” “when,” and “who” questions.• Giving explanations helps your child think through concepts and step-by-step processes and discloses areas where more work is needed. You can then work together to fill in the gaps in his knowledge.
  • 73. KEEP IT INTERESTING• Tie homework to your child’s interests whenever possible.• Kids are often able to choose their own topic for homework assignments or projects.• Use those opportunities to relate the work to something your child is passionate about.• For example, if an English assignment requires that your child write five compound sentences, suggest that she write about her favorite hobby, a recent family trip, or her pet.• The work goes faster and is more fun when your child is truly engaged in the subject.
  • 74. CHANGE THE SCENERY• Try tackling homework in an unusual location.• Make homework time a special occasion by moving the study area to an offbeat place.• Set up homework camp in a tent in the backyard or living room.• Spread out under a tree or in a tree house.• Try the top bunk or even a walk-in closet. Just be sure to take along all the usual homework supplies so everything your child needs is close at hand.
  • 75. FINAL WORDS THE SECRETS TO SCHOOL SUCCESS1. How You Think is Everything.2. Decide upon Your True Dreams and Goals: Write down your specific goals and develop a plan to reach them.3. Take Action. Goals are nothing without action.4. Never Stop Learning: Go back to school or read books. Get training & acquire skills.5. Be Persistent and Work Hard: Success is a marathon, not a sprint. Never give up.6. Learn to Analyze Details: Get all the facts, all the input. Learn from your mistakes.7. Focus Your Time And Money: Don’t let other people or things distract you.8. Don’t Be Afraid To Innovate: Be different. Following the herd is a sure way to mediocrity.9. Deal And Communicate With People Effectively: No person is an island. Learn to understand and motivate others.10. Be Honest And Dependable: Take responsibility, otherwise numbers 1 – 9 won’t matter.
  • 76. HANDWRITING AND ADD/ADHD• Retrain the BRAIN