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Presentation I created and gave at the 2010 US Youth Soccer workshop in Fort Worth Texas

Presentation I created and gave at the 2010 US Youth Soccer workshop in Fort Worth Texas

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  • Volunteerism is a way of breathing life and living life according to God's words... the giving of love selflessly to those who mist need it.
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  • What does a standard volunteer look like?This is the MSYSA Board of Directors. Let’s see how this fits the profile.
  • Roughly a half million men and women are currently part of our “All Volunteer Force”.This is probably not the same thing most of us had in mind when reading the other government definition of “volunteer”…Yet it’s worth remembering that the people who protect the United States of America are doing so not because they are forced to, but because they volunteered to do so.

Transcript

  • 1. VOLUNTEERS
  • 2. Thomas Jefferson
    wrote the Declaration of Independence
    in his free time.
  • 3. Benjamin Franklin
    organized a voluntary militia in Pennsylvania
    that was instrumental in winning the American Revolutionary War.
  • 4. William Penn
    established a colony of Quakers in the late 17th century
    to teach about taking responsibility for others and improving the world.
  • 5. Davy Crockett
    explored the Tennessee frontier wilderness
    which became
    The Volunteer State
  • 6. Harriet Tubman
    used the northern star to guide her
    as she took many passengers for a ride on the Underground Railroad.
  • 7. Clara Barton
    served as a Civil War nurse
    and went on to establish the American Red Cross in 1881 for relief of natural disasters.
  • 8. The Wright Brothers
    built bicycles for their day job.
    Their after-hours passion gave the world wings.
  • 9. Agatha Christie
    nursed WWI soldiers in Torquay.
    “It was while I was working in the dispensary that I first conceived the idea of writing a detective story.”
  • 10. Winston Churchill
    “Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.”
    “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give…”
  • 11. John F. Kennedy
    founded the Peace Corps Oct. 14, 1960, on the steps of the University of Michigan Union.
    “Americans are willing to contribute. But the effort must be far greater than we have ever made in the past..”
  • 12. Martin Luther King
    had a dream
    that transformed America.
  • 13. Jimmy
    Carter
    builds houses
    that become
    habitats for
    humanity.
  • 14. Steven Spielberg
    compiled a video and film archive at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    to help the world remember.
  • 15. Princess Diana
    became the Peoples’ Princess
    by giving of herself and engaging with those in need.
  • 16. Jim Kelly
    4-time NFL Super Bowl Quarterback for the Buffalo Bills
    raises funds for research to save kids’ lives.
  • 17. Bono
    received 3 Nobel Prize Nominations for his work worldwide
    against poverty, racism, aids…
  • 18. Nelson Mandela
    served 27 years in prison and helped transition South Africa to the multi-racial democracy
    that will host the 2010 World Cup.
  • 19. Mahatma Gandhi
    spoke with wisdom
    “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.”
  • 20. Y
    O
    U
    YOU
    What will you do with your free time?
  • 21. Volunteer Management in Youth Soccer
    Responsible Volunteers
    Where are they and how do we keep them?
  • 22. What is volunteerism?
    The US Government defines a volunteer as a person aged 16 and older who serves through or with an organization without pay.
  • 23. America: A Nation of Volunteers
    Volunteers serving nationwide in 2008:
    61.8 million
    National volunteer rate in 2008:
    26.4%
    National hours volunteered in 2008:
    8 billion
    Source: www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/research-papers.cfm
  • 24. Volunteerism by region
    #1 region for volunteer rate 2006 - 2008:
    Midwest
    #1 state for volunteer rate 2006 - 2008:
    Utah
    #1 large city for volunteer rate:
    Minneapolis-St Paul, MN
    Source: www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/research-papers.cfm
  • 25. Volunteerism by City 2008
    #1 mid-sized metro area volunteer rate:
    Grand Rapids, Michigan
    Almost 272,000 of 1,000,000 residents are recorded volunteers in this Midwestern city.
    Source: www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/VolunteeringInAmericaResearchHighlights.pdf
  • 26. Who volunteers?
  • 27. Who volunteers?
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 28. Who volunteers?
    Fastest growing volunteer communities are among African-Americans and Hispanic groups
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 29. Who volunteers?
    Boomers excel at volunteering!
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 30. Who volunteers?
    Education is the strongest predictor of volunteer activity.
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 31. Who volunteers?
    School enrollment appears to be the most important factor in the likelihood of youth from 16 to 24 years of age to volunteer, rather than age, gender or race.
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 32. Who volunteers?
    Amount of available time only partially predicts volunteer activity level.
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 33. Where are volunteers giving service?
    U.S. Military Dictionary “All Volunteer Force”:
    Term used to refer to the U.S. armed forces in general after the elimination of compulsory military service in the 1970s.
  • 34. Where are volunteers giving service?
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 35. Where are volunteers giving service?
    Of 61.8 million volunteers, only 3.5% volunteer for sports.
    Source: www.volunteeringinamerica.gov U.S. Profile – Volunteering in America
  • 36. Where are volunteers giving service?
    The percent of volunteers dedicated to sports has fallen dramatically in the last 15 years.
    Source: Volunteer Growth In America: A Review Of Trends Since 1974
  • 37. Where are volunteers giving service?
    According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, of the 36.5% of volunteers who are parents –
    45.9% of moms and 37.9% of dads volunteer primarily for youth service-related organizations
    24.4% of parent volunteers donate their time for coaching or teaching related positions
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 38. How much time do volunteers spend?
    Volunteers spend an average of 90 hours per year volunteering.
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 39. How much time do volunteers spend?
    The most common volunteer profile is a:
    college educated married woman
    between the ages of 35 -54
    who works part time and has children
    By definition a very busy person! 
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 40. Lesson…
    Volunteers most frequently donate their time to only one organization. 
    Hence, there is hefty competition among worthy organizations to recruit the best volunteers and be sure that available hours are locked in for the home organization.
  • 41. What is volunteerism worth?
    A vast percentage of youth sports organizations have a large percentage of manpower coming from volunteer sources.
    For every hour of paid adult administrative or coaching time it has been estimated that there are between 5 – 10 hours of volunteer time required for the continuity of the program.
  • 42. What is volunteerism worth?
    How much of your league’s functionality is dependent on the performance of people who do not receive monetary compensation?
    How much would you pay your volunteers to perform their duties?
    One source, the Independent Sector, cites the approximate value of volunteer services at $18.77 per hour.
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 43. What is volunteerism worth?
    A volunteer’s time is worth about $20/hour, according to a report by the Urban Institute with CNCS and UPS Foundation, Volunteer Management Capacity in America’s Charities and Congregations, 2004, as determined in a national survey in which NPO managers were asked how much they would need to pay hired help to do the work of non-paid volunteers. 
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 44. What is volunteerism worth?
    According to a July 2009 survey,
    80% of organizations report some level of fiscal stress due to the economic downturn.
    40% report SEVERE fiscal stress.
    Yet, nearly 75% of these same organizations report that the number of people they serve has INCREASED.
    Source: Research Brief: Volunteers and the Economic Downturn, July 2009, Lester M. Salamon and Kasey L. Spence
    Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies
  • 45. What is volunteerism worth?
    HOW to achieve
    MORE service with FEWER resources?
    The need for and demand on volunteer resources is becoming more important than it has ever been.
  • 46. What is volunteerism worth?
    According to a survey of over 1,400 volunteer organizations between Sept 2008 and April 2009:
    Almost no nonprofit organizations are showing a decrease in their volunteer usage.
    1/3 of organizations report increasing reliance on volunteers to make up the shortfall between services expected and resources to render.
    Nearly 1/2 of organizations expect to increase reliance on volunteers this year.
    Source: Research Brief: Volunteers and the Economic Downturn, July 2009, Lester M. Salamon and Kasey L. Spence
    Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies
  • 47. What is volunteerism worth?
    Yet…
    “Most nonprofits are still letting volunteer talent slip away like water through a leaky bucket.”
    ~ The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
    This has become a nationally recognized problem.
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 48. What is volunteerism worth?
    In April, 2009, President Obama signed the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act dedicating $5.7 billion over five years to encourage volunteerism. 
    "We need your service right now, at this moment in history.  I'm not going to tell you what your role should be; that's for you to discover.  But I'm asking you to stand up and play your part.“
    ~President Barack Obama
    Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/Tuesday-President-Barack-Obama-to-Sign-Landmark-Edward-M-Kennedy-Serve-America-Act
  • 49. What is volunteerism worth?
    Despite a situation in which high unemployment is causing more people to have more non-work hours available to donate, the percent of people who stop volunteering from one year to the next is growing. 
    2005 = 32%  
    2006 = 36%
    Source: Volunteering In America Research Highlights, July 2009, www.nationalservice.gov, Corporation for National & Community Service
  • 50. What is volunteerism worth?
    Of the 61.2 million volunteers who gave time in 2006, 21.7 million chose NOT to donate any time to a charitable cause in 2007.
    Organizations relying on volunteer efforts lost more than 1/3 of their volunteer workforce!
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
    Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) analysis of data from the Volunteer Supplement to the Current Population Survey, 2005-2007.
  • 51. What is volunteerism worth?
    In financial terms, the total of these lost hours is worth more than $38 BILLION in lost value nationally per year!
    The approximate value of lost hours to youth sports per year is in excess of $1.4 BILLION.
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 52. What is volunteerism worth?
    An additional financial benefit to a strong volunteer force:
    78.2% of active volunteers contributed $25 or more to their favorite charities vs. only 38.5% of non-volunteers.
    Given that in 2008 two-thirds of public charities receiving donations saw decreases in financial contributions, it is critical to cultivate a dedicated and loyal volunteer base.
    Sources: Volunteering In America Research Highlights, July 2009, www.nationalservice.gov, Corporation for National & Community Service and Research Brief: Pathways to Service: Learning from the potential volunteer’s perspective, July 2009 http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/PathwayToService.pdf
  • 53. A profoundly valuable resource…
    SOCCER MOMS
    & DADS!!!
  • 54. Lesson …
    Volunteers contribute substantial benefit and financial value to the organizations they serve.
    Organizations using volunteer services reap extensive benefit by reducing turnover and retaining a trained and effective volunteer corps.
  • 55. Why do volunteers get involved?
    Reasons why people choose to volunteer:
    Altruism
    Community improvement
    The direct benefit of the volunteers’ own children (when volunteering for youth organizations)
    Acquisition of new skills
    Self-satisfaction
  • 56. Why do volunteers get involved?
    Altruism: The unselfish concern for the welfare of others
  • 57. Why do volunteers get involved?
    Altruism is one of the rarer motivations for volunteerism.
    Lesson…
    Do not wait for altruism alone to bring volunteers to your organization.
  • 58. Why do volunteers get involved?
    Community Improvement: Neighborhood and community engagement as measured by the following indicators has sharply increased since 2007.
    # people who work with neighbors to fix a community problem
    + 31%
    # people who attend community meetings
    + 17%
    Source: Volunteering In America Research Highlights, July 2009
  • 59. Why do volunteers get involved?
    Being a parent is a powerful motivator for many to enter into volunteer activities for the direct benefit of their own children.
    Source: Monthly Labor Review, August 2003, Volunteerism in the United States, Stephanie Boraas
  • 60. Volunteer Motivation
    Acquisition of new skills
    Broadly recognized as a leading reason for many people to volunteer, the President’s Council on Service and Civic Participation initiated the three-year ‘A Billion + Change’ campaign with the goal of leveraging $1 billion in skilled volunteering and pro bonoservices.
    Source: Research Brief: Pathways to Service: Learning from the potential volunteer’s perspective, July 2009 http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/PathwayToService.pdf
  • 61. Volunteer Motivation
    Whereas many volunteers begin donating time using skills they already possess, economic circumstances leave many looking for completely new skills, a major selling point in recruiting new volunteers.
    Networking, contact building
    Source: Research Brief: Pathways to Service: Learning from the potential volunteer’s perspective, July 2009 http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/PathwayToService.pdf
  • 62. Volunteer Motivation
    Self Satisfaction: In the 1986 benchmark survey Americans’ Changing Lives, volunteers were reported to exhibit:
    Greater life-satisfaction and self-esteem
    Better sense of control over life and physical health
    Lower levels of depression
    Higher degree of happiness
    Source: The Health Benefits of Volunteering: A Review of Recent Research, Corporation for National & Community Service, 2007 http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/07_0506_hbr.pdf
  • 63. Volunteer Motivation
    Higher life satisfaction correlation for retirees than for those individuals who continued to work for pay, an extra benefit for a population that has more dispensable free time. (Harlow and Cantor, 1996)
    The personal sense of accomplishment from volunteer activities has a measurable positive effect on physical and mental health. (Herzog et al., 1998)
    The sense of purpose gained from meaningful volunteer activities moderates loss of purpose due to change of roles such as no longer earning wages. (Greenfield and Marks, 2004)
    Source: The Health Benefits of Volunteering: A Review of Recent Research, Corporation for National & Community Service, 2007 www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/07_0506_hbr.pdf
  • 64. What prevents non-volunteers from participation?
    According to a 2008 Corporation for National and Community Service investigation:
    Non-volunteers perceive themselves as different from the group of people who volunteered in terms of age, responsibility, and amount of available free time.
    Non-volunteers fear excessive and/orlong-term time commitment.
  • 65. What prevents non-volunteers from initiating participation?
    Non-volunteers indicate a greater likelihood of participation if they enter by using a skill they already possess, although some may prefer learning a new skill.
    Non-volunteers are most likely to participate if asked to do so by a friend they trust.
    Source: Volunteering In America Research Highlights, July 2009, www.nationalservice.gov, Corporation for National & Community Service
  • 66. Common complaints causing volunteers to quit
    The Volunteer Management Practices and Retention of Volunteers Report list to avoid:
    Disorganized volunteer experiences
    Unprepared and untrained leaders
    Lack of recognition
    Insufficient materials
    No sense of accomplishment orvisible results
  • 67. Common complaints causing volunteers to quit
    Absence of team motivation
    Mismatched skill and interest with a task assignments
    Lack of proper training, especially when facing critical situations
    Restrictive volunteer assignmentsresulting in frustration
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 68. How do you recruit new volunteers?
    ASK!
    2 in 5 new volunteers become involved because they are asked.
    The majority of recruits are asked by a member of the organization.
    The best recruiters are trusted friends.
    Set a regular contact interval wherecontact lists are combed.
  • 69. How do you recruit new volunteers?
    Promote the organization within friend networks and social groups, using the current volunteer pool.
    Be certain that current volunteers understand the organization’s mission, and how the work they do connects to the mission.
    Regularly acknowledge the results of the volunteers’ work to make it obvioushow each person makes a difference.
  • 70. How do you recruit new volunteers?
    Clearly delineate tasks ahead of time.
    Clearly delineate time expectations. For potential recruits who do not want a long term commitment provide short term tasks.
    Emphasize other volunteer accomplishments, meaningful experiences and contributions.
    Offer skills training.
    Highlight the many benefits listed above that volunteers enjoy.
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009 and Research Brief: Pathways to Service: Learning from the potential volunteer’s perspective, July 2009, http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/PathwayToService.pdf
  • 71. Lesson…
    Take advantage of the research:
    Use the following five volunteer management techniques to develop your Volunteer Management Strategy
  • 72. Why is volunteerism falling off?
    Why do a third of volunteers leave organizations every year?
    According to Volunteer Management Capacity in America’s Charities and Congregations, 2004, many organizations simply don’t use good volunteer management practices. 
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 73. How do you keep volunteers?
    Good Management Technique                % orgs practicing
    Matching volunteers’ skills with appropriate assignments                                     45%
    Recognizing the contributions of volunteers                                                               35%
    Measuring the impact of volunteers annually                                                                   30%
    Providing volunteers with training and professional development                          25%
    Training paid staff to work with volunteers                                                               19%
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 74. How do you keep volunteers?
    1.  MATCH THE VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY WITH THE VOLUNTEER. 
    (55% of organizations fail to do this.)
    Determine your volunteers’ motivations for participating, and when possible help them achieve their objectives within the mission of the organization. Volunteers must feel that they have something unique to contribute, that their time is valuable, and that the purpose for their participation is clear.
    Concisely delineate the benefit of performing a task to both the organization and to the volunteer.
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 75. How do you keep volunteers?
    Be upfront about the task to be performed, the time commitment and the skills needed to perform the task.
    HOW DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION REVIEW VOLUNTEER JOB DESCRIPTIONS AND ASSIGN VOLUNTEER TASKS?
  • 76. How do you keep volunteers?
    2.  RECOGNIZE CONTRIBUTIONS OF VOLUNTEERS.
    (65% of organizations fail to do this.)
    Most organizations list financial donors in various publications, yet few organizations give similar lasting accreditation to donors of time.
    Recognize contributions at all levels including less skilled but necessary. 47% of “general labor” volunteers quit within a year, whereas only 26% of “skilled” task performers quit within the same period.
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 77. How do you keep volunteers?
    Official recognition in the form of an annual ceremony or publication for top volunteers is effective, but regular, intermittent, genuine, spontaneous recognition is most effective…
    HOW SOON AFTER YOUR VOLUNTEERS RENDER SERVICES DO THEY RECEIVEA HEARTFELT “THANK YOU” FOR A JOB WELL DONE?
  • 78. How do you keep volunteers?
    3.  QUANTIFY VOLUNTEER VALUE BY MEASURING THE ANNUAL IMPACT ON YOUR BOTTOM LINE.
    (70% of organizations fail to do this.)
    To many people, “Volunteer” equates with “free”, and “free” equates with valueless. NOT TRUE!
    Organizations that place a specific value on volunteers tend to keep trained volunteerslonger, providing organizations with substantial savings.
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 79. How do you keep volunteers?
    Remember “value of keeping house”: court awarded $60,000 to bookkeeper in June 2009 because she could no longer complete housework as a result of her accident.
    WHAT IS THE ACTUAL VALUE OF YOUR VOLUNTEER’S SERVICES? HOW DO YOU MEASURE YOUR VOLUNTEER CORPS VALUE?
  • 80. How do you keep volunteers?
    4.  PROPERLY DEVELOP VOLUNTEER TALENT.
    (75% of organizations fail to do this.)
    Have an official “welcoming” for new volunteers to encourage an environment of support and belonging.
    Invite volunteers to participate in staff training when possible to foster volunteer positions as integral to the organization.
    Match volunteers to the most appropriate tasks by skill level and desire.
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 81. How do you keep volunteers?
    Include clear description of time and performance expectations, increasing responsibilities as appropriate.
    Rotate less desirable tasks at regular intervals.
    HOW DO YOU WELCOME, TRAIN, AND INTEGRATE YOUR VOLUNTEER CORPS?
  • 82. How do you keep volunteers?
    5.  TRAIN PAID STAFF TO EFFECTIVELY MANAGE VOLUNTEERS.
    (81% of organizations fail to do this.)
    Actively manage your volunteer corps, avoiding the practice of 81% of organizations that leave volunteer organization to haphazard management.
    Institute an official Volunteer Management Policy including contact point person for volunteer questions, assignments, and scheduling.
    Source: The New Volunteer Workforce, David Eisner, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, & Susannah Washburn in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2009
  • 83. How do you keep volunteers?
    COMMUNICATE! One of the biggest complaints voiced by volunteers is lack of knowledge about the organization or direction.  How many times have you heard, or said, “I don’t know; I’m just a volunteer.”
    DO YOU HAVE ANOFFICIAL VOLUNTEERMANAGEMENT STRATEGY?
  • 84. Final Lesson…
    For the good of our kids, treat your volunteers like the treasure they are.
  • 85. Summary
    Volunteer Demographics
    Who volunteers in which organizations, and how much time do they donate?
    Very busy people who tend to donate time to relatively few organizations.
    Lesson: Make sure that you recruit the best folks before they are recruited elsewhere!
  • 86. Summary
    Volunteer Value
    Q. What are volunteers worth to your organization in terms of benefit derived vs. cost to manage?
    In tough economic times with more demand for services and fewer resources volunteer value is higher than ever.
    Lesson: Substantial benefit to retainingtrained volunteers for as long as possible!
  • 87. Summary
    Volunteer Recruitment and Retention
    Q. How can you best recruit top-notch volunteers and then retain them long-term?
    Understand volunteer motivation to participate and reasons why they quit.
    Lesson: Formulate an official Volunteer Management Strategy using five techniques to train/retain volunteers
  • 88. Your Volunteer Corps
    “Though government has an important role to play in meeting the many challenges that remain before us, we are coming to understand that no organization, including government, will fully succeed without the active participation of each of us. Volunteers are vital to enabling this country to live up to the true promise of its heritage.”
    ~President Bill Clinton
    “A volunteer is a person who can see what others cannot see; who can feel what most do not feel. Often, such gifted persons do not think of themselves as volunteers, but as citizens – citizens in the fullest sense: partners in civilization.”
    ~President George Bush
  • 89. For the Good of the Game…
    “VOLUNTEERS ARE NOT PAID – NOT BECAUSE THEY ARE WORTHLESS, BUT BECAUSE THEY ARE PRICELESS.”
    ~An anonymous volunteer
  • 90. “What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments but what is woven into the lives of others.”
    Pericles circa 430 B.C.
  • 91. Acknowledgements
    Michigan State YouthSoccer Association
    www.michiganyouthsoccer.org
  • 92. Acknowledgements
    Children Waiting Everywhere
    www.childrenwaitingeverywhere.org
    Gramer’s Chocolates
    www.gramerschocolate.com
  • 93. My inspiration
    The children who get up every day and do something hard…
  • 94. About this volunteer…
    Wendy Zielen is a marketing specialist with a background in sales, trend analysis, motivational training, teaching, languages, and administration.  She came into soccer as a volunteer to help her daughter’s team, and was swept away by the interaction of the game, her children, and the metaphor of soccer as life.  She learned to play, coach, and referee the game, and eventually founded two leagues. Today she volunteers her time in a variety of ways for the Michigan State Youth Soccer Association as well as several other organizations.
    Share your ideas with her at abcsoccer@gmail.com.
  • 95. Works Cited
    Boraas, Stephanie. "Volunteerism in the United States." Monthly Labor Review Online 126.8 (2003): 3-11. Monthly Labor Review Online. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Aug. 2003. Web. 17 Feb. 2010. <http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/welcome.htm>.
  • 96. Works Cited
    Eisner, David, Robert T. Grimm, Jr., Shannon Maynard, and Susannah Washburn. "The New Volunteer Workforce." Stanford Social Innovation Review (2009): 31+. Stanford Social Innovation Review. Stanford Graduate School of Business, Winter 2009. Web. 17 Feb. 2010<http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/the.new.volunteer.workforce>.
  • 97. Works Cited
    Giving USA Foundation. U.S. charitable giving estimated to be $307.65 billion in 2008. Giving USA Foundation. 10 June 2009. Web. 18 Feb. 2010. <http://www.givingusa.org/press_releases/gusa.cfm>.
  • 98. Works Cited
    Grimm, Jr., Robert, Kimberly Spring, and Nathan Dietz. The Health Benefits Of Volunteering: A Review Of Recent Research. Rep. Corporation for National and Community Service, Office of Research and Policy Development, Apr. 2007. Web. 17 Feb. 2010. <http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/07_0506_hbr.pdf>.
  • 99. Works Cited
    Grimm, Jr., Robert, Nathan Dietz, John Foster-Bey, David Reingold, and Rebecca Nesbit. Volunteer Growth In America: A Review Of Trends Since 1974. Rep. Corporation for National and Community Service, Dec. 2006. Web. 18 Feb. 2010 <http://www.serveminnesota.org/PDFFiles/VolunteerGrowthReport.pdf>.
  • 100. Works Cited
    Hager, Mark A., and Jeffrey L. Brudney. Volunteer Management: Practices And Retention Of Volunteers. Rep. The Urban Institute, June 2004. Web. 18 Feb. 2010. <http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/411005_VolunteerManagement.pdf>.
  • 101. Works Cited
    Listening Post Project. Johns Hopkins University Center for Civil Society Studies. Web. 18 Feb. 2010. <http://listeningpostproject.blogspot.com/>.
  • 102. Works Cited
    Salamon, Lester M., and Kasey L. Spence. Volunteers and the Economic Downturn. Rep. Corporation for National and Community Service, July 2009. Web. 17 Feb. 2010. <http://www.mavanetwork.org/Content/Documents/Document.ashx?DocId=93206>.
  • 103. Works Cited
    Spring, Kimberly, Nathan Dietz, and Robert Grimm, Jr. Leveling the Path to Participation: Volunteering and Civic Engagement Among Youth From Disadvantaged Circumstances. Rep. Corporation for National and Community Service, Mar. 2007. Web. 18 Feb. 2010. <http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/07_0406_disad_youth.pdf>.
  • 104. Works Cited
    United States. Corporation for National and Community Service. Issue Brief: Volunteer Retention. Corporation for National and Community Service, Apr. 2007. Web. 18 Feb. 2010. <http://agweb.okstate.edu/fourh/focus/2007/may/attachments/VIA_brief_retention.pdf>.
  • 105. Works Cited
    United States. Corporation for National and Community Service. Research Brief: How Do Volunteers Find The Time?: Evidence From The American Time Use Study. Corporation for National and Community Service, July 2008. Web. 17 Feb. 2010. <http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/ATUS_Brief.pdf>.
  • 106. Works Cited
    United States. Corporation for National and Community Service. Volunteering in America Research Highlights. Corporation for National and Community Service, July 2009. Web. 17 Feb. 2010. <http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/VolunteeringInAmericaResearchHighlights.pdf
  • 107. Works Cited
    United States. United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. News. Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2008. Volunteering In The United States, 2008. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 23 Jan. 2009. Web. 18 Feb. 2010. <http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/volunteer_study_08.pdf>.
  • 108. Works Cited
    • Volunteer Management Capacity in America's Charities and Congregations A Briefing Report. Rep. Washington, D.C., 2004. Volunteer Management Capacity in America's Charities and Congregations A Briefing Report. Urban Institute, 2004. Web. 17 Feb. 2010. <http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/410963_VolunteerManagment.pdf>.
  • Works Cited
    • "U.S. Profile -." Volunteering in America. 27 Apr. 2008. Web. 18 Feb. 2010. <http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/national>.
  • Works Cited
    Volunteering in America. Corporation for National and Community Service, 27 Apr. 2008. Web. 18 Feb. 2010. <http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/research-papers.cfm>.
  • 109. Works Cited
    Welcome to Serve.gov. Corporation for National and Community Service, 18 Feb. 2010. Web. 18 Feb. 2010. <http://www.serve.gov/>.
  • 110. Works Cited
    http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/Tuesday-President-Barack-Obama-to-Sign-Landmark-Edward-M-Kennedy-Serve-America-Act
  • 111. It’s a beautiful day!
  • 112. Don’t let it get away.
  • 113. Thank you.