Slips trips falls working surfaces ppt

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Presentation on how to prevent slips, trips and falls.

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  • Great Power Point. Here's another resource on preventing slips and falls - http://www.safetyawakenings.com/wheres-the-best-deal-on-slip-resistant-shoes/
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  • ROLLIE
    Welcome to the Slips, Trips, and Falls training session. We hope this training will provide you with information that will help you create a safer work environment for you and your coworkers.
    Slips, trips, and falls are the leading cause of injuries to State of Wisconsin employees. Broken legs and arms, broken hips, severe back injuries and concussions are typical injuries resulting from a slip, trip or fall. These injuries can be painful and often require long recovery periods but fortunately, most injuries can be prevented.
    This web cast will identify common slip, trip and fall risks in your workplace to help you avoid an accident or injury to yourself or your co-workers.
  • ERIN
    More than likely, we have all either slipped, tripped, or fallen and hurt ourselves at some point in our lives. So how do slips, trips, and falls happen? (CLICK)
    A slip occurs when there is little traction or friction between the shoe and the walking surface. (CLICK)
    A trip occurs when a person’s foot contacts an object in their way or drops to a lower level unexpectedly, causing them to be thrown off-balance. (CLICK)
    A fall occurs when you are too far off balance.
    This web cast will focus on incidents related to work situations that you may encounter at your workplace.
  • ROLLIE
    There are two types of falls:
    The first type is a fall on the same level. This is also the most common type.
    The second type is a fall from an elevation. This typically occurs on stairs or from ladders, platforms, or loading decks and can cause serious injury.
    In this web cast, we’ll show you examples of both same level and elevation falls in the workplace.
  • ERIN
    Computer and telephone cords tucked under desks and run across walking pathways cause injuries every year. Make sure the computer cords and cables in and around your workspace are tied together and placed securely out of the way.
    Unsecured electrical cords in aisles and workstations are also a common workplace hazard. Typically this occurs when a device is plugged into an electrical outlet on another wall, away from the actual device, or again, when the cords are not properly secured. When you see this in your workplace, let your supervisor know. Your supervisor should then contact maintenance to help solve the problem.
  • ROLLIE
    Spills on floors at work are another common hazard. What should you do to reduce the risk of injury?
  • ROLLIE
    A spill of any type on any floor should be cleaned-up immediately to save a co-worker from slipping. If you are able to clean it up yourself, you may choose to do so. If not, contact your maintenance area to take care of the spill.
    If the spill cannot be cleaned up immediately, using a sign to warn everyone of the wet floor is a good interim, preventive measure.
    Regardless of how the spill occurred, this is not a situation in which to believe the myth, “Someone else will do it”. While this may be true, before someone has the chance to clean up the spill, a co-worker could get seriously injured. Always remember, safety is everyone’s responsibility.
    Now, let’s take a look at a few more workplace hazards.
  • ERIN
    Mats are frequently used to keep moisture, oil, grease or debris off of smooth surfaced floors. When used properly, mats help avoid potential injuries. When the mat is folded back however, it can quickly become the cause of an accident. Anyone could catch their foot on the mat and take a terrible fall.
    When you see a folded mat like this, and if you are able, please take the time to unfold it. If unable to do so, contact someone who can, such as your facility maintenance area.
  • ERIN
    As with some of the other pictures we’ve seen today, general housekeeping lapses often create the potential for serious injuries.
    This is a picture of a stairwell with several safety hazards, many of which are trip hazards. How many of these trip hazards can you identify?
    WAIT A FEW SECONDS…
    Finished? Let’s go through them one-by-one.
    See the trash cans in front of the doorway outside of the stairway? Anyone carrying a package or turning their head momentarily at precisely the wrong time when entering or exiting the stairwell could trip over these trash cans. Trash cans should never be placed in walkways or near stairway entrances or exits.
    Here we also see a cinderblock used to prop open a stairway door. Anyone could run into the cinderblock, twisting an ankle, breaking a toe or falling to the hard surface floor and sustaining an even more severe injury. Also, stairway doors, when closed, serve to prevent fires from spreading. An open door will not help to contain a fire.
    The board up against the wall is also a trip hazard.
    Another is the chair.
    Stairways should not be used for storage. If you come across a cluttered stairway, please report this to either your supervisor or your facility maintenance area immediately.
  • ROLLIE
    Here you see a portion of the sidewalk has given way to a sink-hole.
    If you look in the upper left hand corner you will see a warning barricade. If a barricade is not already in place, contact your maintenance area immediately. Any time a hole is identified on a walking surface, barricades or warning indicators should be immediately installed around the hole to prevent a trip and fall.
    The barricade will not fix the hole. But if you see one placed near any hazard, you’ll know that your facility is already working on permanently resolving the problem area before an accident happens.
  • ERIN
    Slip, trip, and fall hazards also exist in office settings. It’s important to close your desk and file cabinet drawers immediately after each use. Employees quickly refocus to the tasks they’re working on and forget they’ve left a drawer open. Later, when turning to leave their workspace, a worker can turn hard and fast into the open drawer or even trip over it. Painful leg and ankle injuries can occur by leaving drawers open.
    Also keep the floor around your workspace free of boxes, cords, cables, materials, and other objects.
    You might be surprised how easily the objects in your workspace can become hazards. Since it’s your workspace and often your safety at stake, please do whatever you can to keep your work area safe and injury-free.
  • ROLLIE
    Here you see a picture in a warehouse where the traffic pathway is well marked and free of obstacles. Keeping pathways free of materials, equipment, and other objects will greatly reduce the potential for injury.
    And remember to keep cables, cords, wires, and hoses secured, and away from walkways and other paths of travel.
  • ERIN
    Stairs are another area where falls often occur. Here you see someone who is about to fall. She’s not holding the handrail. If she were, she might be able to correct her balance before she falls.
    Falling down the stairs can cause serious injuries with long recovery times. Always hold the handrail when climbing or descending stairs, don’t rush, don’t skip steps, and don’t carry anything that will compromise your ability to hold the handrail.
  • ERIN
    If you have an awkward or large load to carry, always use a cart. When you’re transporting that load to another floor, take the elevator – NEVER take the stairs.
    Whether you are on the stairs or walking across the floor, you should never carry a load you can’t see over or around.
  • ERIN
    Always check to be sure that your pathway is unobstructed and your view is clear before you lift anything and carry small loads close to your body for better balance.
    The woman on the right is violating two rules of safety. She is carrying too much to handle and she cannot see over or around the boxes. She should take two trips, use a cart, or get some assistance in order to avoid an accident.
    During your typical workday, you will see many potential safety hazards.
    You’ve seen several in today’s web cast. Let’s take a look at a few more.
  • ROLLIE
    Here’s something seen far too often. NEVER use any chair as a ladder, but especially never use a folding chair or a chair with casters. This is very dangerous and if an employee falls it would almost certainly cause an injury.
    Ladders are specifically designed to help you safely step up and extend your reach.
    If you need a box that’s too high to reach, need to change a light bulb on the ceiling, or need something on a high shelf, ask for assistance from either your supervisor or a fellow employee who is able to assist you. If a ladder is used, make sure the worker climbing the ladder is qualified and comfortably doing so.
    Never jeopardize your safety or that of a co-worker and remember, a chair is not a ladder and should NEVER be used to stand on for any reason.
  • ROLLIE
    Ladders serve as helpful tools around the workplace but can quickly become a hazard if not used correctly.
    Be sure to:
    Have a good hand-hold before stepping up.
    Place your foot on the step or rung just in front of your heel, under the arch.
    Make sure you have three points of contact, and
    NEVER stand on the top of a ladder.
  • ERIN
    Heavy work equipment, whether used indoors or out, is often muddy, wet or greasy. These conditions present a hazard to employees entering and exiting the unit.
    To help avoid an injury, first make sure the equipment’s running board, tread, step, foothold, and platform are dry and clean of any contamination.
    Also:
    Make sure to clean your footwear;
    Face equipment when entering and exiting;
    Have a good hand-hold before stepping up or down; and,
    Place your foot fully under your arch on the step or foothold.
  • ERIN
    The pictures you see here are excellent examples of how to use three points of contact when entering or exiting a truck or large piece of equipment, or, when climbing up or down a ladder.
    Do you see the man pictured here in the illustration using one hand and two feet or using two hands and one foot? This is the correct way to enter equipment.
    Also, never jump off or out of when exiting the bed of a truck or any other part of equipment. Instead, step down carefully while facing equipment.
  • ROLLIE
    Your work activities may also take you outdoors where additional hazards exist. Be careful on wet grass, mud, gravel and in parking lots.
    Pay attention everywhere you walk. Be aware of outdoor hazards that can cause you to slip, trip, or fall.
    Pay extra attention if you are walking near a construction area or an area where maintenance work is being performed.
  • ERIN
    Wearing the right footwear for your job will help prevent or reduce your risk of having a slip, trip, and fall incident.
    Make sure your footwear:
    Fits snugly and comfortably;
    Is slip-resistant with good tread;
    Is clean and in good condition at all times; and,
    Is repaired or replaced when necessary
    No footwear has anti-slip properties for every condition, so remember to always use caution at work.
  • ERIN
    Here are some examples of soles you should use for various work environments.
    If you’re not sure about which footwear is the most appropriate for your work environment, ask your supervisor or do some research online or in the store.
  • ROLLIE
    You’ve seen a number of common workplace hazards and many ways to help alleviate and avoid accidents and injuries.
    The good news.... ? Slips, trips and falls are preventable and you are in the best position to prevent them. Here are some safety tips.
  • ERIN
    We are all busy multi-taskers at work, doing more than one thing at a time. But we still need to play it safe while doing our work.
    So,
    Pay attention to your surroundings;
    Look where you are going;
    When walking or going up or down the stairs, don’t engage in activities that distract your attention; and
    Do not read, write, text, or dial when you are walking.
  • ROLLIE
    Be sure to watch for any change in surface texture from one type of walking surface to another so you can adjust your pace and stride accordingly;
    Take extra care when you come indoors with wet shoes; and,
    Slow down and take small careful steps if the surface is uneven, cluttered, slippery or inclined.
  • ERIN
    Maintain clear, tidy work areas free of clutter by:
    Following good housekeeping procedures. Don’t wait until you’re done with your project or unpacking boxes to throw unnecessary materials away. Throw materials away immediately, while you’re working. You may save someone from tripping over your materials.
    Fix hazards such as small spills and cluttered walkways if you are able to do so;
    Use caution when entering/exiting vehicles and equipment and when climbing and descending ladders and stairs; and,
    Report hazards promptly before an accident happens.
  • ROLLIE
    The best way to prevent an incident is to be aware and prepared for possible dangerous situations.
    When you “go where you are looking and look where you are going” and, report potential hazards immediately, you help reduce workplace accidents and injuries and create a safer work environment for everyone.
  • ROLLIE
    Remember, accidents at work are preventable. Be sure to:
    Pay attention
    Be proactive, and
    Be careful
    Thank you for watching this web cast and always remember, safety is everyone’s responsibility.
  • Slips trips falls working surfaces ppt

    1. 1. Slips, Trips, and Falls
    2. 2. What are Slips, Trips & Falls? Slip A slip occurs when there is too little traction or friction between the shoe and walking surface. A trip occurs when a person’s foot contacts an object in their way or drops to a lower level unexpectedly, causing them to be thrown off-balance. Trip Fall A fall occurs when you are too far off balance.
    3. 3. What are Slips, Trips & Falls? There are two types of falls: Same Level From ElevationWhen you fall to the surface you are walking on. Same level falls are more common. When you fall to a level below the one you are walking on. Falls from elevation are more severe. Caused by: • Slips • Trips Falls From: • Ladders • Stairs •Platforms • Loading docks
    4. 4. Extension Cords •Install electrical, data, and telephone outlets where needed •Secure cables and cords with tape or cord covers Computer and Telephone Cords
    5. 5. What should be done to fix this hazard?
    6. 6. What is wrong here?
    7. 7. What is wrong here?
    8. 8. Work Organization and Tidiness • Close your desk, cabinets, and file drawers and doors immediately after each use. • Keep the floor around your workspace free of boxes, cords, cables, materials, and other objects.Organized and tidy work space
    9. 9. Work Organization and Tidiness • Keep walkways and aisles clear of materials, equipment, and other hazards • Keep cables, cords, wires, and hoses away from walkways and other paths of travel Pathway is clearly marked and free of obstructions.
    10. 10. Be Careful on the Stairs •Always use the handrails when climbing or descending the stairs •Do not rush and skip steps •Don’t carry anything that will compromise your ability to hold onto the handrail
    11. 11. Be Careful on the Stairs •When going to another floor/level, take the elevator if you are carrying things requiring the use of both hands. •NEVER carry a load you can’t see over or around. Use a cart.
    12. 12. What is wrong with this picture?
    13. 13. •Have a good hand-hold before stepping up. •Place your foot on the step or rung just in front of your heel, under the arch. •Always make sure you have three points of contact. •NEVER stand on the top of a ladder. Climbing/Descending Ladders
    14. 14. • Clean footwear of mud, paint, grease, or any other contamination. • Make sure running board, tread, step, foothold, and platform of equipment are also clean and dry of any contamination. • Always face equipment when entering and exiting. • Place your foot on the step or foothold just in front of your heel, under the arch. Entering/Exiting Equipment Safely
    15. 15. Entering/Exiting Equipment Safely • Maintain three-point contact at all times while getting onto/off of the equipment until reaching ground, cab, or stable platform. Courtesy of Construction Safety Association of Ontario • Step down or up carefully while facing equipment. • Do not jump off when entering/exiting bed of a truck or other part of the equipment. Three-point contact examples: – one hand, two feet – two hands, one foot
    16. 16. Outdoor Slip, Trip, and Fall Dangers
    17. 17. Wear Proper Footwear Wearing the right footwear for your work environment will help prevent or reduce slip, trip, and fall incidences. • Footwear should fit snugly and comfortably. • Keep your footwear clean and in good condition at all times. • Inspect regularly for any damage; repair or replace worn or defective footwear. • Replace shoes or replace soles before they become worn smooth.
    18. 18. The Right Footwear for the Work Wearing shoes with increased traction does not substitute the need for safe walking practices! Wear the appropriate type of footwear for your work place. Work Environment Type of Sole Kitchen Microcullular urethane, rubber soles Machine shop (oily floors) Oil-resistant soles Office Neoprene soles Garage (rough concrete) Crepe Soles
    19. 19. Slips, Trips, and Falls Are Preventable!
    20. 20. •Pay attention to your surroundings •Look where you are going when you walk •Do not engage in activities that distract your attention •Do not read, write, text, or dial while you are walking Pay Attention Ways to Prevent Slips, Trips, and Falls
    21. 21. •Walk carefully and slowly when you transition from one type of walking surface to another •Adjust your walking pace and stride. •Take extra care when you come indoors with wet shoes •Slow down and take small careful steps if the surface is uneven, cluttered, slippery or inclined Pay Attention Ways to Prevent Slips, Trips, and Falls
    22. 22. • Maintain clear, tidy work areas free of clutter • Follow good housekeeping procedures by cleaning up and throwing out debris and materials while you work • Fix hazards such as small spills and cluttered walkways if you are able to do so safely • Use caution when entering/exiting vehicles and equipment and when climbing and descending ladders • Report hazards promptly Pay Attention Ways to Prevent Slips, Trips, and Falls
    23. 23. • Go where you are looking, and look where you are going • If you see a potential hazard, report it immediately
    24. 24. Pay Attention Be Proactive Be Careful

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