@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   image from Folger Shakespeare Library
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   Penns Fisher Fine Arts Building from flickr user fakoman
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   “Adjunct” from flickr user Derek Bridges
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   image by SW
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   image from SW
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   GW undergraduate from Folger Shakespeare Library
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   “10x4 leaf clovers, 1x5 leaf clover” from flickr user Greencolander
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   “Caught” from flickr user Montauk Beach
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   Shakespeare portrait from Folger Shakespeare Library
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   more Shakespeare portraits from Folger Shakespeare Library
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   and more portraits from Folger Shakespeare Library
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   “I want to be in there” from flickr user LibraryatNight
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   “dreams gone by” from flickr user tombothetominator
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   “Emperor Maximilian II (1527-1576), his wife Maria of Spain, and his children Anna,         ...
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   image from flickr user Madbuster75
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   “All hands on deck” from flickr user The Suss-Man (Mike)
Ill see your international scandal                                        and raise you                                   ...
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   “pierced” from flickr user Scrivenings
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   “Folger magnolia” from flickr user zizzybaloobah
@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270   image from Folger Shakespeare Library
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

MLA13: "Make your own luck"

5,077 views
5,071 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,077
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4,580
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • [slide 1: Folger]I am the Undergraduate Program Director at the Folger Shakespeare Library, a position I’ve held for six years. It’s a job that combines working in one of the premier special collections of early modern literature and culture with teaching a small number of highly motivated and curious students. This is how I got here.
  • [slide 2: Furness]I did a PhD in English, researching modern feminist performances of Shakespeare. After finishing, I was fortunate to get a two-year teaching postdoc, and after that, a one-year research postdoc. At the end of that, I got married to someone who had a job lined up in a Washington DC law firm, and so we moved and I started my life as an independent scholar.
  • [slide 3: Prof X]I spent the next year writing my book at the Folger. During that time, I became friends with a local Shakespearean who told me that her department was looking for someone as a leave replacement. So I spent the next year teaching drama and composition at The George Washington University and the following year as an adjunct at George Mason, a job I found again through my Shakespeare friend.
  • [slide 4: blank Shakespeare]Then I heard from my friend that the head of the Folger Institute wanted to take a year off. And so Gail recommended me to Kathleen, Kathleen went to write her book, and I ran the Institute for a year. At the end of that gig, another contact asked if I’d adjunct at Georgetown, covering his Shakespeare classes, and so my George-trifecta was complete.
  • [slide 5: crying J]At the end of my year at Georgetown I gave birth to my second child (I’d had the first one after my GW stint) and I spent the following year trying to catch my breath and work out how to mother two children with a spouse who was frequently traveling and parents who were aging more rapidly than I was ready to admit. The lesson I learned was that I was not cut out to stay at home.
  • [slide 6: Marissa in RR]Luckily, at that point my friend Gail, by now the Folger’s Director, hired me as a consultant on a planning grant for developing undergraduate programming in book history at the Library. So I became an independent contractor, put together an implentation plan, and then became the inaugural Folger Undergraduate Program Director, a job that I love.
  • [slide 7: four-leaf clover]I’ve used the word “luckily” to describe how I got to this place, and I certainly benefitted from luck. I live in a town rich in possibilities for Shakespeare scholarship, and I know people who led me to temporary jobs and to my current career. And for a long time I thought of how I got here as a product of luck.
  • [slide 8: baseball catch]But another way to think about luck is to see it as the residue of design. I wasn’t simply lucky. I worked hard—persistently and creatively—to be in a position to take advantage of opportunities that might come my way. I didn’t always know what it was that I was working toward, but I was working nonetheless. So here’s another version of the story of how I got my job.
  • [slide 9: Shakespeare]While I was turning my dissertation into a book, I submitted an excerpt to Shakespeare Quarterly. My article wasn’t accepted, but I had a nice correspondence with the editor and our paths later crossed at the Shakespeare Association conference. That editor was Gail Kern Paster, and when I moved down to Washington DC, we were both regulars at the Folger and we would chat about our research.
  • [slide 10: Shakespeare +]Because she knew my work, she recommended me to fill in at GW. Because I knew the Folger as a reader and program participant, had administrative experience from grad school, and was an active scholar in Shakespeare circles, I was a good fit for the Institute. By this point, I’d come to know the Folger’s culture and resources and that of faculty, students, and administrators at three of the area’s largest schools.
  • [slide 11: Shakespeare ++]I’d built a network of colleagues across Washington DC and across the Shakespeare community. When the Folger needed to hire someone who knew the Library and local schools, who had the administrative skills and the intellectual breadth to set up a new program, I met those needs. It wasn’t luck that I got my job, it was years of hard work.
  • MLA13: "Make your own luck"

    1. 1. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 image from Folger Shakespeare Library
    2. 2. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 Penns Fisher Fine Arts Building from flickr user fakoman
    3. 3. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 “Adjunct” from flickr user Derek Bridges
    4. 4. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 image by SW
    5. 5. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 image from SW
    6. 6. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 GW undergraduate from Folger Shakespeare Library
    7. 7. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 “10x4 leaf clovers, 1x5 leaf clover” from flickr user Greencolander
    8. 8. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 “Caught” from flickr user Montauk Beach
    9. 9. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 Shakespeare portrait from Folger Shakespeare Library
    10. 10. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 more Shakespeare portraits from Folger Shakespeare Library
    11. 11. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 and more portraits from Folger Shakespeare Library
    12. 12. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 “I want to be in there” from flickr user LibraryatNight
    13. 13. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 “dreams gone by” from flickr user tombothetominator
    14. 14. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 “Emperor Maximilian II (1527-1576), his wife Maria of Spain, and his children Anna, Rudolf and Ernst”
    15. 15. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 image from flickr user Madbuster75
    16. 16. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 “All hands on deck” from flickr user The Suss-Man (Mike)
    17. 17. Ill see your international scandal and raise you one daughter getting married@wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 image inspired by Texts from Hillary
    18. 18. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 “pierced” from flickr user Scrivenings
    19. 19. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 “Folger magnolia” from flickr user zizzybaloobah
    20. 20. @wynkenhimself #mla13 #s270 image from Folger Shakespeare Library

    ×