Principles of Design
DESIGN PRINCIPLES <ul><li>Compositional means by which artists arrange design elements for effective visual expression. </...
Chaos
Chaos
Chaos
Chaos
Monotony
Monotony
 
REPETITION <ul><li>Use of any element or object more than once in an artifact in order to structure a viewer ’s experience...
VARIETY <ul><li>Visual diversity to avoid an unintended monotonous composition and to hold the viewer ’s interest. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
UNITY <ul><li>The feeling that a composition holds together well visually and is designed to be experienced as a whole. </...
UNITY <ul><li>Unity is achieved by balancing variety and repetition. </li></ul>
<ul><li>Identify the visual elements that repeat or vary. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain how Unity is achieved. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
GESTALT <ul><li>An aspect of cognitive psychology developed in the early twentieth century by German psychologists and phi...
 
 
 
 
 
PROXIMITY <ul><li>The relative distance between elements in an artifact. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RHYTHM <ul><li>The movement, fluctuation, or variation marked by a regular recurrence of related elements. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PATTERN <ul><li>A systematic  repetition  of an element in a work. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
BALANCE <ul><li>An equilibrium of weight and force; distribution of weight enabling someone or something to remain upright...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
VISUAL BALANCE <ul><li>The appearance of equilibrium in a work of art. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
SYMMETRICAL BALANCE <ul><li>Visual or actual equilibrium of visual elements in size, shape, and placement. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bilateral Symmetry <ul><li>Symmetry in which similar anatomical parts are arranged on opposite sides of a median axis so t...
 
 
 
RADIAL BALANCE <ul><li>Equilibrium achieved by elements emanating from a point, usually the center, in a composition. </li...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ASYMMETRICAL BALANCE <ul><li>Visual or actual equilibrium that is almost but not exactly symmetrical. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
tension
 
 
VISUAL CONTRAST <ul><li>Degree of visual difference among elements of art in a composition as a means of emphasis. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DIRECTIONAL FORCE <ul><li>Arrangement of elements that can move the viewer ’s eye in, around, or through a work of art. </...
Directional Force <ul><li>Vertical Force </li></ul><ul><li>Horizontal Force </li></ul><ul><li>Diagonal Force </li></ul><ul...
 
 
DIRECTIONAL LINES <ul><li>Visual or implied lines that move the viewer ’s attention to an artifact’s focal point. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
VISUAL HIERARCHY <ul><li>Arrangement of design elements in terms of their importance to the expressive purposes of the wor...
Hieratic Scale
 
EMPHASIS/SUBORDINATION <ul><li>Arrangement of elements of art to make some areas the primary focus of a viewer ’s attentio...
FOCAL POINT <ul><li>An area of an artifact that grasps and holds a viewer ’s attention. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Size, Scale, and Proportion <ul><li>Making a Statement with Size </li></ul><ul><li>Playing with Scale </li></ul><ul><li>Se...
 
 
 
SCALE  <ul><li>The comparative size of a work of art or object in relation to other artworks, or objects and/or normative ...
PROPORTION <ul><li>The relationship of the sizes of parts to each other and to the whole. </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dalton Ghetti
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Principles of Design

1,674 views

Published on

Published in: Spiritual, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,674
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
148
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
86
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Principles of Design

  1. 1. Principles of Design
  2. 2. DESIGN PRINCIPLES <ul><li>Compositional means by which artists arrange design elements for effective visual expression. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Chaos
  4. 4. Chaos
  5. 5. Chaos
  6. 6. Chaos
  7. 7. Monotony
  8. 8. Monotony
  9. 10. REPETITION <ul><li>Use of any element or object more than once in an artifact in order to structure a viewer ’s experience of that work. </li></ul>
  10. 11. VARIETY <ul><li>Visual diversity to avoid an unintended monotonous composition and to hold the viewer ’s interest. </li></ul>
  11. 16. UNITY <ul><li>The feeling that a composition holds together well visually and is designed to be experienced as a whole. </li></ul>
  12. 17. UNITY <ul><li>Unity is achieved by balancing variety and repetition. </li></ul>
  13. 18. <ul><li>Identify the visual elements that repeat or vary. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain how Unity is achieved. </li></ul>
  14. 30. GESTALT <ul><li>An aspect of cognitive psychology developed in the early twentieth century by German psychologists and philosophers investigating hw the mind seeks unity and closure. The “gestalt” of an artifact is the general feeling it evokes in viewers-the sense of a whole, complete object. </li></ul>
  15. 36. PROXIMITY <ul><li>The relative distance between elements in an artifact. </li></ul>
  16. 44. RHYTHM <ul><li>The movement, fluctuation, or variation marked by a regular recurrence of related elements. </li></ul>
  17. 54. PATTERN <ul><li>A systematic repetition of an element in a work. </li></ul>
  18. 60. BALANCE <ul><li>An equilibrium of weight and force; distribution of weight enabling someone or something to remain upright and steady. </li></ul>
  19. 73. VISUAL BALANCE <ul><li>The appearance of equilibrium in a work of art. </li></ul>
  20. 78. SYMMETRICAL BALANCE <ul><li>Visual or actual equilibrium of visual elements in size, shape, and placement. </li></ul>
  21. 85. Bilateral Symmetry <ul><li>Symmetry in which similar anatomical parts are arranged on opposite sides of a median axis so that only one plane can divide the individual into essentially identical halves </li></ul>
  22. 89. RADIAL BALANCE <ul><li>Equilibrium achieved by elements emanating from a point, usually the center, in a composition. </li></ul>
  23. 98. ASYMMETRICAL BALANCE <ul><li>Visual or actual equilibrium that is almost but not exactly symmetrical. </li></ul>
  24. 107. tension
  25. 110. VISUAL CONTRAST <ul><li>Degree of visual difference among elements of art in a composition as a means of emphasis. </li></ul>
  26. 119. DIRECTIONAL FORCE <ul><li>Arrangement of elements that can move the viewer ’s eye in, around, or through a work of art. </li></ul>
  27. 120. Directional Force <ul><li>Vertical Force </li></ul><ul><li>Horizontal Force </li></ul><ul><li>Diagonal Force </li></ul><ul><li>Circular Force </li></ul><ul><li>Triangular Force </li></ul><ul><li>Using Multiple Directional Forces </li></ul>
  28. 123. DIRECTIONAL LINES <ul><li>Visual or implied lines that move the viewer ’s attention to an artifact’s focal point. </li></ul>
  29. 136. VISUAL HIERARCHY <ul><li>Arrangement of design elements in terms of their importance to the expressive purposes of the work. This may be accomplished through the use of hieratic scale . </li></ul>
  30. 137. Hieratic Scale
  31. 139. EMPHASIS/SUBORDINATION <ul><li>Arrangement of elements of art to make some areas the primary focus of a viewer ’s attention. </li></ul>
  32. 140. FOCAL POINT <ul><li>An area of an artifact that grasps and holds a viewer ’s attention. </li></ul>
  33. 150. Size, Scale, and Proportion <ul><li>Making a Statement with Size </li></ul><ul><li>Playing with Scale </li></ul><ul><li>Searching for Perfection in Proportion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Classical Proportions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Spiral </li></ul></ul>
  34. 154. SCALE <ul><li>The comparative size of a work of art or object in relation to other artworks, or objects and/or normative conventions. </li></ul>
  35. 155. PROPORTION <ul><li>The relationship of the sizes of parts to each other and to the whole. </li></ul>
  36. 172. Dalton Ghetti

×