2008 APA NATIONAL CONFERENCE
 
 
 
Group 1:  Background Why do we need to rethink how we educate students in psychology? <ul><li>There are now well-establish...
Group 1: :  Recommendations Why do we need to rethink how we educate students in psychology? <ul><li>Psychological Literac...
Group 2:  Background Who is teaching psychology and what is the quality of instruction? <ul><li>Nearly 50% of credit hours...
Group 2:  Recommendations Who is teaching psychology and what is the quality of instruction? <ul><li>Quality instruction s...
Group 3 :  Background What is being taught and learned in psychology courses?  (including the impact of fragmentation of p...
Group 3 :  Recommendations What is being taught and learned in psychology courses?  (including the impact of fragmentation...
Group 4 :  Background Who are the students in undergraduate psychology? (and how do we challenge  the traditional “one-siz...
Group 4 :  Recommendations Who are the students in undergraduate psychology? (and how do we challenge  the traditional “on...
Group 5:  Background When and where are students taking psychology courses? <ul><li>Psychological science is taught to stu...
Group 5:  Recommendations When and where are students taking  psychology courses? <ul><li>We must recommit the discipline ...
Group 6:  Background What is the optimal process for teachers to select,  implement and assess teaching methods in order t...
Group 6:  Background What is the optimal process for teachers to select, implement and assess teaching methods in order to...
Group 7 :  Background How can we promote learning with new technologies? (including interactive learning agents, online pr...
Group 7 :  Recommendations How can we promote learning with new technologies? (including interactive learning agents, onli...
Group 8:  Background How are we using knowledge gained over the last decade about effective teaching and learning? <ul><li...
<ul><li>Recommendations For Teachers and Learners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Collect baseline and control or comparison data to...
Group 9:  Background What are the desired outcomes of an undergraduate education in psychology? <ul><li>Psychology educati...
Group 9:  Recommendations What are the desired outcomes of an undergraduate education in psychology? <ul><li>Psychology ed...
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2008 Ncuep3

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  • 2008 Ncuep3

    1. 1. 2008 APA NATIONAL CONFERENCE
    2. 5. Group 1: Background Why do we need to rethink how we educate students in psychology? <ul><li>There are now well-established liberal learning and disciplinary outcomes for psychology majors (APA, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Rigorous quality benchmarks for undergraduate psychology programs (e.g., Dunn, 2007) are now available for continuing renewal and developmental efforts </li></ul><ul><li>Psychology must also dialogue with global discussions in the discipline and trans-disciplinary trends in American higher education </li></ul><ul><li>Psychological Literacy is a synthesis of trans-disciplinary liberal learning outcomes and global disciplinary outcomes and quality benchmarks </li></ul>
    3. 6. Group 1: : Recommendations Why do we need to rethink how we educate students in psychology? <ul><li>Psychological Literacy should become a defining quality for US and global higher education students enrolled in psychology courses and programs </li></ul><ul><li>Educating Psychologically Literate Citizens should become the aspirational outcome for all undergraduate students because it is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consistent with global trends in defining undergraduate disciplinary outcomes for scientific psychology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consistent with trans-disciplinary trends in American higher education for defining liberal learning outcomes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Responsive to the critical need for ethical responsibility and social commitment in global higher education’s future alumni </li></ul></ul>
    4. 7. Group 2: Background Who is teaching psychology and what is the quality of instruction? <ul><li>Nearly 50% of credit hours in US Colleges and University are taught by contingent faculty </li></ul><ul><li>Relatively few resources are dedicated to developing the teaching skills of “nonpermanent” faculty </li></ul>
    5. 8. Group 2: Recommendations Who is teaching psychology and what is the quality of instruction? <ul><li>Quality instruction should be gauged by contextualized evidence of student work and reflective practices that show improvement over time </li></ul><ul><li>We need to endorse an evidence-based scientist-educator model for quality teaching that parallels the scientist-practitioner model for clinical and other practice </li></ul>
    6. 9. Group 3 : Background What is being taught and learned in psychology courses? (including the impact of fragmentation of psychology toward specialized disciplinary societies and new interdisciplinary specialties on the psychology major) <ul><li>Challenges within the discipline </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Specialization & fragmentation of the field, and courses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Popularity of applied psychology may de-emphasize the scientific nature of the field </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Challenges outside the discipline </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rise of consumerist culture means that students (and administrators) may be less willing to take and support foundational courses within the discipline </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accountability movement in Higher Education may lead to a reductionistic view of educational outcomes within the field </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technological revolution poses challenges, as well as opportunities to the delivery of quality content and skills acquisition </li></ul></ul>
    7. 10. Group 3 : Recommendations What is being taught and learned in psychology courses? (including the impact of fragmentation of psychology toward specialized disciplinary societies and new interdisciplinary specialties on the psychology major) <ul><li>All students complete introductory psychology before taking other psychology courses. </li></ul><ul><li>Students then complete courses in Research Methods and Statistics </li></ul><ul><li>Students complete at least one course in each content domain: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Biological bases (e.g., Physiological psychology) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Developmental (e.g., Life-span development) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning and cognition ( e.g., Cognitive) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sociocultural (e.g., Social psychology) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Diversity and Ethics should be well-integrated in subsequent courses, especially those representing four specific content domains above </li></ul><ul><li>A capstone course and opportunities to apply knowledge (e.g., internships, labs, field experiences, etc.) should be included in each major </li></ul>
    8. 11. Group 4 : Background Who are the students in undergraduate psychology? (and how do we challenge the traditional “one-size-fits-all” curricular approach to meeting the needs of a diverse student population) <ul><li>What sorts of characteristics do students bring into the classroom? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Demographics: Changes/projections of undergraduates (in general and in psychology) over the next 2 decades (E.g., Disabilities, ethnic/racial/linguistic, SES, sexual orientation, gender, religious affiliations, age, linguistic diversity). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What kinds of key developmental issues do these students face during the college years? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Development occurs along many dimensions and in multiple domains. Students have multiple identities, some visible and some not. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What do they need from their experiences to thrive in higher education? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Formal and Informal Curriculum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diversity focused courses, diversity infused courses, interdisciplinary courses, out-of-class activities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Classroom and campus climate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Compositional diversity, psychological perceptions, social interactions, historical legacies, and legal, political, and societal contexts. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    9. 12. Group 4 : Recommendations Who are the students in undergraduate psychology? (and how do we challenge the traditional “one-size-fits-all” curricular approach to meeting the needs of a diverse student population) <ul><li>Faculty and advisors should be aware of and sensitive to the demographics and developmental trajectories of their students and employ instructional and advising strategies designed to engage the full range of students. </li></ul><ul><li>Department administrators and faculty members should actively create and sustain climates of mutual respect and open communication recognizing the many factors that contribute to climate. </li></ul><ul><li>Faculty and administrators with responsibility for faculty development should provide opportunities for faculty members to develop their multicultural competencies, and hold faculty members accountable for effectively applying these skills </li></ul><ul><li>Ethical Issues: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Balance between recruiting students to our discipline and informing them about the boundaries of a psychology undergraduate degree. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to address the gender disparity in the profession to maintain diversity of perspectives in academic discourse. Recruitment efforts should be balanced with advocacy for higher salaries for students earning degrees in psychology. </li></ul></ul>
    10. 13. Group 5: Background When and where are students taking psychology courses? <ul><li>Psychological science is taught to students across the lifespan, in a wide variety of contexts, at all hours of the day and night, in most parts of the world and using many instructional methods </li></ul><ul><li>People learn about psychology through both formal (coursework in high school, college, the military, professional development training) and informal modalities (the media, folklore </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers of psychology have an ethical responsibility to teach empirically based psychological science and to dispel misinformation about the discipline </li></ul>
    11. 14. Group 5: Recommendations When and where are students taking psychology courses? <ul><li>We must recommit the discipline to the underlying belief that psychology is an empirical science grounded in the scientific method. To this end we recommend that the discipline be referred to as Psychological Science and college Psychology Departments be renamed Departments of Psychological Science </li></ul><ul><li>Psychological information in middle-school and high school health and science textbooks should be appropriately attributed to psychological science and school curricula should include information labeled psychological science so that children can appreciate what the discipline has to offer </li></ul><ul><li>We recommend that an effort to expand and improve psychological science web sites be initiated to better </li></ul><ul><ul><li>educate the public about psychological science, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>alert the public quickly when misinformation is in the “public eye” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>investigate sources and patterns of misinformation reported about psychological science </li></ul></ul>
    12. 15. Group 6: Background What is the optimal process for teachers to select, implement and assess teaching methods in order to achieve desired learning outcomes? <ul><li>The number of teaching methods is large and diverse: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>There are well over 100 documented teaching methods </li></ul></ul><ul><li>All these methods are effective in some situations but ineffective, even counterproductive, in others </li></ul><ul><li>There is no single best teaching method for all teachers, all students, and all topics </li></ul>
    13. 16. Group 6: Background What is the optimal process for teachers to select, implement and assess teaching methods in order to achieve desired learning outcomes? <ul><li>Teaching is context-sensitive </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teaching effectiveness is the result of a complex interaction of multiple factors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An instructor must oversee the complex interaction of factors such as the characteristics of the teacher, the students, the topic and the desired learning outcomes. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A teaching method is not an algorithm that always leads to success, but a heuristic that must be implemented, assessed and adjusted for each situation. </li></ul>
    14. 17. Group 7 : Background How can we promote learning with new technologies? (including interactive learning agents, online programs that teach collaborative peer evaluation, game-based models of learning, and virtual learning environments among others) <ul><li>What are ways in which technology can facilitate teaching and learning? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Placing technology in the context of learners and pedagogy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Using technology today and tomorrow </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other issues: inclusive excellence & ethics </li></ul></ul>
    15. 18. Group 7 : Recommendations How can we promote learning with new technologies? (including interactive learning agents, online programs that teach collaborative peer evaluation, game-based models of learning, and virtual learning environments among others) <ul><li>Further encourage empirical assessment of new technologies </li></ul><ul><li>APA-sponsored web resources to assist psychology instructors in wise use of available technologies </li></ul><ul><li>APA develop targeted support for online instructors </li></ul>
    16. 19. Group 8: Background How are we using knowledge gained over the last decade about effective teaching and learning? <ul><li>There have been exciting gains over the last decade in our knowledge about how people learn. </li></ul><ul><li>Few of these findings, however, have been demonstrated to be effective outside of the lab, especially in the context of the higher education classroom. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The dynamic interaction between the active role of the student, individual differences in teacher and learner, as well as contextual variations have not been adequately studied </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It would be premature to recommend specific practices in specific contexts without further translational research in representative contexts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>While models exist to bridge the gap from lab to classroom and classroom to the lab, the structural supports needed to encourage and reward mature translational research are scant. </li></ul>
    17. 20. <ul><li>Recommendations For Teachers and Learners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Collect baseline and control or comparison data to enhance reflection and scholarly teaching. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage students to invest in developing metacognitive strategies that generalize across contexts. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Recommendations For Educational Institutions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide formal training in teaching and ongoing professional development for all teachers on content and process knowledge. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create reward structures that support translational research as much as non-teaching related research. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Recommendations For Policymakers and Granting Institutions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitate and reward translational collaborations between scholarly teachers and researchers to build the knowledge base in SOTL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide funding for formal teacher training and ongoing professional development. </li></ul></ul>Group 8: Background How are we using knowledge gained over the last decade about effective teaching and learning?
    18. 21. Group 9: Background What are the desired outcomes of an undergraduate education in psychology? <ul><li>Psychology education broadly impacts millions of students, whether they be psychology majors, minors, or students who just complete a handful of psychology courses </li></ul><ul><li>The degree of impact of an undergraduate education in psychology is relatively unknown, especially for non-majors </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment measures need to capture skills and abilities in addition to knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>The vast majority of psychology majors do not attend graduate school in psychology, yet we know little about their career paths, adequacy of preparation, and success in the workplace </li></ul><ul><li>There are no formal mechanisms in place to assure quality in an undergraduate program in psychology </li></ul>
    19. 22. Group 9: Recommendations What are the desired outcomes of an undergraduate education in psychology? <ul><li>Psychology educators work to create outcomes assessment instrumentation that measures progress based on the APA Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major. </li></ul><ul><li>Psychology educators focus more on the career paths and career development of psychology baccalaureates that do not further their education in psychology so that these students may serve as role models and ambassadors for the discipline. </li></ul><ul><li>Psychology educators form a task force to study the impact of psychology education when exposure is limited, for instance the impact when a student only completes introductory psychology, or a few courses </li></ul><ul><li>Psychology educators begin a national conversation about the benefits and drawbacks of accrediting undergraduate psychology departments for quality assurance purposes. </li></ul>

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