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Caravaggio

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  • 1. High Renaissance (1490-1527) Chiaroscuro: beginning with base tone toward lighter shades to show contrastPortinari Alterpiece (c. 1475), Hugo van der Goes (Flemish), Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence, Italy
  • 2. High Renaissance (1490-1527) Chiaroscuro: beginning with base tone toward lighter shades to show contrast Diogenes (c. 1524-1529; woodcut), Ugo da Carpi (Italian)
  • 3. High Renaissance (1490-1527) Chiaroscuro: beginning with base tone toward lighter shades to show contrast Hercules at the Crossroads (1640-1642), Giovanni Baglione (Italian), National Gallery of Slovenia, Ljubljana
  • 4. Michelangelo Caravaggio (1571-1610; Italian) Born into the earlier years of the Counter-Reformation, which led the Church to seek religious work to counter Protestantism Began his popular career with Martyrdom of St. Matthew (1600), having focused on male youths with sexual subtleties beforehand Died of a fever with a death warrant issued by the Church still in place after his murdering a young man in Rome Averaged 3-5 major paintings each year from 1592-1610 Only rediscovered in the early 20th Century with many works contributed to his followers, the Caravaggisiti Credited as one of the influences bringing about techniques that ushered in the Baroque era of painting
  • 5. Tenebrism tenebrism: dramatic chiaroscuro in which darkness dominates Naturally occurring chiaroscuro and tenebrism with Werner X, created by the rims of Purbach, La Caille, and Blanchinus craters
  • 6. Martyrdom of St. Matthew (1599-1600)Contarelli Chapel, San Luigi dei Fracesi, Rome, Italy
  • 7. The Calling of St. Matthew(1599-1600; La Vocazione di San Matteo) Contarelli Chapel, San Luigi dei Fracesi, Rome, Italy
  • 8. The Crucifixion of Saint Peter (1601; Martirio de San Pietro) Cerasi Chapel, Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome, Italy
  • 9. Judith Beheading Holofernes (1598-1599) Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica, Rome, Italy
  • 10. Saint Gerome(1605-1606; San Gerolamo) Galleria Borghese, Rome, Italy
  • 11. The Taking of Christ (1602)National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland
  • 12. The Conversion of St. Paul (1607)Cerasi Chapel, Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome, Italy
  • 13. The Crowning with Thorns (1607) Kunsthistorische Museum, Vienna
  • 14. Death of the Virgin(circa 1601-1606; La Morte della Vergina) Borghese, Rome, Italy
  • 15. Reclining John the Baptist (circa 1610) Private Collection
  • 16. CaravaggistiJudith and Her Maidservant with the Head of Holoferenes (c. 1625); Artemisia Gentileschi (Italian)
  • 17. Discussion Questions Is tenebrism truly different from chiaroscuro, or is it simply a more advanced use of the technique? How did the anatomy aspect of mannerism change with the onset of the Baroque style? Do you think this is related to the evolution of chiaroscuro and tenebrism? Does Caravaggio’s use of color interact with the impact of his use of lighting? Why or why not? How did the Caravaggisiti develop his technique further, or did they simply copy him?