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IT Business Proposal for upgrading existing network infrastructure to meet the growing business needs of a small to medium-sized company. Proposal is supported by actual OPNET simulation data. Part ...

IT Business Proposal for upgrading existing network infrastructure to meet the growing business needs of a small to medium-sized company. Proposal is supported by actual OPNET simulation data. Part 1 encompasses the business analysis.

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    IT Business Proposal Part 1 - Business Analysis IT Business Proposal Part 1 - Business Analysis Document Transcript

    • IT BUSINESS PROPOSAL UPGRADING EXISTING NETWORK TO MEET FUTURE NEEDS OF YOUR BUSINESS Part 1 Business Analysis - Evaluation of existing network capacityRevision Created On1.0 November 6, 2004Project Lead Project Lead Dr. Lynn DeNoia__________________________________ Phil Wu _______________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________
    • Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTSSection Page1.0 Executive Summary…………………………………………………………………... 42.0 Background Summary…………………………………………………....................... 53.0 Baseline Opnet Model……………..…………………………................................... 64.0 Existing Network Capacity in Meeting TECs Current Needs .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... 7 4.1 Baseline Backbone Switch Performance …………………………………............ 8 4.2 Baseline Server Load and Utilization …………………………………………... 8 4.3 Baseline Network Capacity and Utilization ……………………………………. 8 4.4 Baseline Results…………………………………………………………………… 85.0 Suitability of Existing Network in Meeting Future Needs …………………………. 9 5.1 Model 2 - Consolidated Call Center Application ………………………………... 9 5.2 Model 3 - Increased Usage of Web and Email …………………………………. 9 5.3 Model 4 - Other Considerations ………………………………………………… 9 5.4 Future Backbone Switch Performance ………………………………................... 9 5.5 Future Server Load and Utilization ….…………………………………………... 10 5.6 Future Network Capacity and Utilization ……………………………………... 10 5.7 Future Results …………………………………………………………………... 106.0 Recommended actions to be taken by TEC ……………………………………… 11Appendix A Model Descriptions…………………………………………………………….... 12Appendix B Supporting Simulation Results and Statistics ………………………………….. 14 LIST OF TABLESTable Page1 Baseline Model Attributes……………………………………………………………. 62 Baseline Backbone Switch Performance Data………………………………………. 63 Baseline Server Load and Utilization Data …………………………………………. 64 Baseline Network Capacity and Utiilization Data …………………………………. 75 Future Backbone Switch Performance Data …………………………………………. 96 Future Server Load and Utilization Data ……………………………………………. 97 Future Network Capacity and Utilization Data ……………………………………. 9 LIST OF FIGURESFigure Page1 Baseline Opnet Model ………………………………………………………………. 62 Modified Baseline Model …………………………………………………………... 123 Baseline Backbone Switch Packets Dropped ………………………………………... 144 Baseline CPU Utilization (%) of Each Server ………………………………………. 145 Baseline Overall Load (requests/sec) on Each Server ………………………………. 146 Baseline Task Processing Time (sec) of Each Server………………………………. 147 Baseline Server Load (request/sec) by Application - Database (heavy, light)……….. 158 Baseline Server Load by Application - Email (light)…… ………………………….. 159 Baseline Server Load by Application - FTP (light, heavy)………………………….. 1510 Baseline Server Load by Application - HTTP (light)………………………………. 1611 Baseline Link Utilization - point to point (%) Across all Links …………………….. 1612 Baseline Link Utilization - point to point (%) Across All Links 2…………………. 1713 Model 2 Backbone Switch Packets Dropped ………………………………………... 17
    • Page iii14 Model 2 Server CPU Utilization …………………………………………………... 1715 Model 2 Overall Server Load (requests/sec)……… ………………………………... 1816 Model 2 Server Task Processing Time (sec)… ……………………………………... 1817 Model 2 Link Utilization - point to point (%)………………………………………... 1818 Model 3 Backbone Switch Packets Dropped………………………………………... 1919 Model 3 Server CPU Utilization (%)………………………………………………... 1920 Model 3 Overall Server Load (requests/sec)………………………………………... 1921 Model 3 Server Task Processing Time (sec)… ……………………………………... 1922 Model 3 Link Utilization - point to point (%) across all links ……………………... 2023 Model 4 Backbone Switch Packets Dropped ………………………………………... 2024 Model 4 Server CPU Utilization (%) ………………………………………………... 2025 Model 4 Overall Server Load (requests/sec) ………………………………………... 2126 Model 4 Server Task Processing Time (sec)………………………………………... 2127 Model 4 Link Utilization across all links - point to point (%)………………………... 2128 Comparison of Web and Email Server Loads (requests/sec) on Web and Email 22 Server between models……………………………………………………………...
    • Page 41.0 Executive SummaryThe risk of losing customers due to poor customer service has created a need for a more efficient way ofattending to customer needs in the form a call center application in a consolidated call center . This reportexamines the viability of integrating such a solution into the existing network. A modeling and simulationtool was utilized to evaluate the how well the existing network is meeting TECs current needs and howwell it would be able to accommodate future business applications (i.e. call center application) and futuregrowth.The new call center application would be the heart of the new consolidated call center. The applicationwould streamline the way customer calls are expedited and processed and enhance the capabilities of theexisting automated call interface which is currently very limited in functionality (i.e., does not offercustomers the option of checking account information via touchtone input). Presently, valuable humanresources must be allocated to consolidate, sort and prioritize calls from customers. Furthermore, as thecompany continues to grow, the increasing volume of customer service calls will put additional strain onexisting personnel in the Customer Service Department. In addition, some calls are trivial ones that couldotherwise be answered by the enhanced automated interface without making the customer wait for a humanrepresentative. For instance, customer service personnel must still answer calls where a customer simplywants to check whether or not an order was shipped; the new application could check the customer servicedatabase and respond with an automated reply to the customers touchtone input. This would free upvaluable human resources and allow the limited staff in the Customer Service Department to focus oncustomers who are experiencing more pressing issues or problems.Simulation results from the analysis indicate that the existing network is underutilized with plenty ofnetwork capacity to spare for new applications and growth. Therefore, a new call center application,including one with web capabilities, could be integrated into the existing network with no foreseeableproblems. A web interface to the call center application would allow customer service personnel tomaintain and operate the consolidated call center easily and efficiently. Further modeling and simulationsindicate that the existing network is well suited to handle increased database activities and increased usageof web and email services as a result of the new call center application and company growth in general.
    • Page 52.0 Background SummaryNew business applications, growth and expansion of the company in the future will have potentialimplications on existing networking technologies that support the business. Changes to the business sidemay or may not require changes to the existing network.This report contains the results from studies that were done on the existing network using a modeling andsimulation tool called Opnet. Detailed models of the existing network were constructed in Opnet andsimulations were performed using these models. Data that was gathered from these simulations helped usto measure existing server load, network capacity and utilization. These measurements provide insight intohow well the existing network is meeting TECs current needs. Additional modeling and simulations wereperformed to determine how well suited the existing network can support new business applications like thecall center application and increased usage of web and email services. Data gathered from thesesimulations helped us to anticipate and mitigate the risk of any potential problems that may arise as a resultof future changes. Any potential changes that need to be made to the current network in order toaccommodate those future needs are identified and appropriate recommendations are made.
    • Page 63.0 Baseline Opnet ModelThe initial baseline model was generated and configured with properties that roughly reflect the generalusage of TECs existing networking technologies. This baseline model served as a starting point of ouranalysis. Subsequent models were generated and configured to reflect potential changes to the existingnetwork as a result of new business applications or growth. Model descriptions of these subsequent modelscan be found in Appendix A. Figure 1 - Baseline Opnet Model Baseline Model Description:The baseline model above in Figure 1 consists of the following:Model Constraint Description5 server objects to model the 5 central servers at Each server object is configured to supportTEC. appropriate services7 LAN objects to model each LAN that resides in Each LAN object was configured with appropriateeach building (Note: the Admin building modeled profiles to generate and direct the appropriate trafficusing 3 LAN objects, each representing the to their appropriate servers.departments that reside inside).A 16 port ethernet backbone switch. default settings100BaseT links to connect all servers and LAN default settingsobjects to the backbone switch.All traffic that was generated was based on a used exponential distribution
    • Page 7Poisson Distribution to more closely model networktraffic in a real enterprise setting.application profile configuration Default application settings are used in the initial baseline Opnet model Table 1 - Baseline Model Attributes• In order to verify that the model was configured properly, detailed statistics that were generated by theOpnet model simulation were carefully examined. These statistics revealed whether traffic was beinggenerated and directed to their appropriate destinations (refer to Appendix B for detailed statistics). Assumptions about the characteristics of the network - baseline model• It is assumed that roughly 50% of the database traffic being generated from the AdministrationDepartment for Sales and Marketing is directed towards the Order Provisioning Server while the other 50%will be directed towards the Customer Information Server.• It is assumed that roughly 50% of the web traffic being generated from Computing Center is directedtowards the Web and Email Server while the other 50% is directed towards the Network ManagementServer.4.0 Existing Network Capacity in Meeting TECs Current NeedsWe performed Opnet simulations using the baseline model to measure TECs current server and networkcapacity and utilization. The data gathered from the simulation results helped us determine how well theexisting network infrastructure and associated technologies are meeting TECs current needs. A summaryof the results are given below.Note: All analysis in this report is based upon avg. "steady-state" simulation results.4.1 Baseline Backbone Switch PerformanceThe performance of the backbone switch to which all servers and LANs are connected was analyzed. Thesimulation results are summarized below. Baseline Backbone Switch Performance (refer to Figure 3, Appendix B) Packets Room for growth? dropped Baseline Model 0 yes Table 2 - Baseline Backbone Switch Performance DataThe switch appears to have no problems be handling the current volume of traffic from all the LANS andservers as no packets were dropped over the duration of the simulation.4.2 Baseline Server Load and UtilizationThe simulation results for the current load and utilization of each server are summarized below. Geographic Order Customer Web and Network Information Provisioning; Database; billing; email Management Server Facilities and accounting; Server Server Equipment trouble tickets Inventory Server ServerAvg. CPU Utilization (%) for Each Server (refer to Figure 4, Appendix B)
    • Page 8Baseline Model ~5.0 % ~0.02 % ~3.3 % ~0.15 % ~0.005 %Server CPU Peak Utilization (%) (refer to Figure 4, Appendix B)Baseline Model ~13.0 % ~0.027 % ~4.70 % ~1.50 % 0.038 %Server Overall Load (requests/sec) (refer to Figure 5, Appendix B)Baseline Model ~1.1 ~13.5 ~1.0 ~5.0 ~0.5Server Peak Load (requests/sec) (refer to Figure 5, Appendix B)Peak Load ~5.3 ~15.7 ~1.6 ~41.3 ~1.8(requests/sec)Room for Growth? yes yes yes yes yes Table 3 - Baseline Server Load and Utilization DataInitial baseline measurements on Server Load and Utilization indicate that all Servers are meeting TECscurrent needs quite well. Simulation results indicate that all servers are being very "lightly" utilized withall servers operating with an average of less than 5 % Utilization. The peak utilization on the GIS of 13 %at start-up is still a very small number.4.3 Baseline Network Capacity and UtilizationAvg. Link Utilization (%) (Refer to Figure11, Figure 12, Appendix B) All LinksBasline Model very low (1.3 % peak, avg. << 1.0 %)Room for Growth? yes Table 4 - Baseline Network Capacity and Utiilization DataLink utilization across all links is extremely light.4.4 Baseline Results The following assertions can be made about the existing network based upon the data that was gatheredfrom simulation results produced for the baseline model above:• TECs existing networking technologies are supporting their current needs quite well with much room toaccommodate future business applications and growth. In fact, the overall network is only being veryslightly utilized. In particular: • The backbone switch has no problems handling the current volume of traffic. • Server loads and utilization across all servers are low. No hardware upgrades to servers are necessary at this time. The existing servers have much room to accommodate a significantly greater amount of load. • Current utilization of every link is very low and there is much network capacity to accommodate much greater volumes of traffic.
    • Page 95.0 Suitability of Existing Network in Meeting Future NeedsWorking off the baseline model, 3 new models were developed in order to address the suitability ofexisting technologies in accommodating future growth and new business applications. Simulations usingthese models were performed to analyze the impact of the following on the existing network:1.) A consolidated call center application integrated into the current network.2.) Increased use of email and web services by all employees.3.) New hires in the customer service department.Further consultation with the TEC liaison revealed the following:• A new consolidated call center in the administration building will be manned by existing customerservice staff.• The new call center will utilize automated call distribution system that will answer and direct customerphone calls to appropriate departments and/or personnel.• TEC prefers to dedicate one server to each application.5.1 Model 2 - Consolidated Call Center ApplicationThe implications of these attributes are highlighted below in blue (refer to Appendix A for specificmodifications made to the baseline model to reflect the changes).• A new server will be dedicated to the application with its own database to store voice messages,customer IDs, voice prompts, calls through the network, announcements etc... -Server will support Database (light and heavy) services -Employees in admin_custserv will be accessing database information from the Order_provisioning server• Customers can choose and perform various tasks through the automated interface (touchstone or voiceactivated) like checking account information or order information and status of trouble tickets using thissystem (they can also talk to a representative about those items). -Increased usage of database services on the Customer Information server -Increased usage of database services on the Order provisioning server• Various services that the Call Center offers will be web-enabled (i.e. customers can check delay time ofeach customer service call online). -Server will support Web services -Admin_custserv LAN will be generating web traffic to call_ctr server5.2 Model 3 - Increased Usage of Web and Email• The above model was further modified to reflect an overall increase in Web and Email usage by allemployees. -increased usage of the Web and Email services on Web and Email server5.3 Model 4 - Other Considerations• There exists the possibility that the customer service department will need to hire more workers to helpsupport activities in the Call Center. -increased number of workstations needed in customer service department
    • Page 10 5.4 Future Backbone Switch Performance The performance of the backbone switch to which all servers and LANs are connected was analyzed. The simulation results are summarized below. Future Backbone Switch Performance (refer to Figur 13, Figure 19, Figure 24, Appendix B) Packets dropped Model 2 0 Model 3 0 Model 4 0 Table 5 - Future Backbone Switch Performance Data The switch appears to have no problems be handling the current volume of traffic from all the LANS and servers as no packets were dropped over the duration of the simulation for all models. 5.5 Future Server Load and Utilization The simulation results for the load and utilization of each server for each model above are summarized below.Avg. Server CPU Utilization (%) (refer to Figure 15, Figure 20, Figure 25, Appendix B) GIS Order Customer Web and Network Call Center Server Provisioning; Database; billing; email Mgmt Server Facilities and accounting; Server Server Equipment trouble tickets Inventory Server ServerModel 2 ~5.4 ~0.023 ~2.1 ~0.13 ~0.0048 ~0.27Model 3 ~5.4 ~0.023 ~1.83 ~0.145 ~0.0061 ~1.33Model 4 ~5.61 ~0.023 ~3.08 ~0.153 ~0.0046 ~1.80Overall Load (requests/sec) (refer to Figure 16, Figure 21, Figure 26, Appendix B)Model 2 ~1.16 ~14.11 ~0.818 ~4.282 ~0.499 ~0.197Model 3 ~1.2 ~13.6 ~0.829 ~49.0 ~1.56 ~0.757Model 4 ~1.25 ~13.87 ~1.24 ~50.57 ~1.42 ~1.327 Table 6 - Future Server Load and Utilization Data 5.6 Future Network Capacity and Utilization Future Avg. Link Utilization (Refer to Figure 18, Figure 23, Figure 28, Appendix B) All Links Model 2 very low (1.3 % peak, avg. << 1.0 %) Model 3 very low (1.3 % peak, avg. << 1.0 %) Model 4 very low (1.3 % peak, avg. << 1.0 %) Table 7 - Future Network Capacity and Utilization Data Link utilization across all links is still light.
    • Page 115.7 Future ResultsThe following assertions can be made about the existing network based upon the data that was gatheredfrom simulation results produced for the above mentioned models above:• Overall, the existing network is set up to accommodate future needs quite well. • From a technical standpoint, there should be no problem integrating the Consolidated Call Center Application into the existing network. • The existing network will be able to handle increased volumes of traffic due to increased usage of web and email services. • Therefore, no additional modifications to the existing network are necessary at this point in time. • A significant increase in the overall load the web and email server was observed from model 2 to model 3 and 4.6.0 Recommended actions to be taken by TECLooking ahead into the future, however, the first area of concern may likely be increasing load on the weband email server. Ever increasing volumes of web and email traffic due to continuing overall growth maysignificantly increase the overall load on the server; we noticed a significant jump in the overall load formodels 3 and 4 with increased web browsing and email services (refer to Figure 29, Appendix B)Recommendations: • Split the web and email server up into separate two servers: one dedicated to email services and one dedicated for web services only.Aside from that, we do not anticipate any potential problems that may arise as a result of integrating a newcall center application into the existing network at this point in time.Recommendations: • Recommend that TEC move ahead with implementing a new call center application by adding a new server connected to the backbone switch using a 100BaseT connection. • Purchase and install the Call Center Application on both the server and customer service workstations.
    • Page 12Appendix A: Model Descriptions Model 2 Figure 2 Modified Baseline ModelDescriptionModel 2 is basically a modified version of the baseline model with Consolidated Call Center Applicationadded to it and the following renditions: -added new server to support consolidated call center application -configured new server to support Database light and heavy services -configured admin_custserv LAN to generate Database light traffic to order_prov_svr server -Configured admin_custserv LAN to access web light traffic to call_ctr_svr server
    • Page 13 Model 3DescriptionModel 3 is basically a modified version of Model 2 with increased usage of web and email Services and thefollowing renditions: -Added HTTP "heavy" and email "heavy" services to all LAN profiles to reflect increased usage of web and email services for all employees Model 4DescriptionModel 4 is basically modified version of Model 3 with increased number of personnel in Customer ServiceDepartment and the following renditions: -increased number of workstations in the admin_custserv LAN Assumptions about above Models• It is assumed that the duration of peak web browsing and email traffic can last anywhere from 15minutes to a few a hours depending upon various business factors (i.e., tight deadlines, heavy activities oncustomer service end, etc...)• It is assumed that roughly 50% of the database traffic being generated from the AdministrationDepartment for Sales and Marketing is directed towards the Order Provisioning Server while the other 50%will be directed towards the Customer Information Server.• It is assumed that roughly 50% of the web traffic being generated from Computing Center is directedtowards the Web and Email Server while the other 50% is directed towards the Network ManagementServer.• Web traffic from the Customer Service Department will be directed to the web_and_mail_svr server 70%of the time and the call_ctr_svr server 30% of the time. It is assumed that employees in Customer Servicemay need to access web services specific to the call_ctr_svr server in order to assist customers.• It is assumed that database traffic from the Customer Service Department will be directed to thecustomer database half the time and the call center database half the time.
    • Page 14Appendix B: Supporting Simulation Results and Statistics SIMULATION RESULTS - Baseline Model Figure 3 Baseline Backbone Switch Packets Dropped Figure 4 Baseline CPU Utilization (%) of Each Server Figure 5 Baseline Overall Load (requests/sec) on Each Server Figure 6 Baseline Task Processing Time (sec) of Each Server
    • Page 15 Figure 7 Baseline Server Load (request/sec) by Application - Database (heavy, light)• Shows servers that provide database services and the load on each.• Verifies that database traffic is directed only to those servers that provide Database (heavy) - CustomerInformation server, and Database (light) services - Order Provisioning server, Network Management server. Figure 8 Baseline Server Load by Application - Email (light)• Shows servers that provide email services and the load on each.• Verifies that Email traffic is directed only to those servers that provide Email (light) services -Web andEmail server. Figure 9 Baseline Server Load by Application - FTP (light, heavy)• Shows servers that provide email services and the load on each.• Verifies that email traffic is directed only to those servers that provide FTP (heavy) services - GIS server,FTP (light) services- Web and Email server.
    • Page 16 Figure 10 Baseline Server Load by Application - HTTP (light)• Shows servers that provide email services and the load on each.• Verifies that email traffic is directed only to those servers that provide Web Browsing (light) services -Web and Email server and Network Management Server. Figure 11 Baseline Link Utilization - point to point (%) Across all Links
    • Page 17 Figure 12Baseline Link Utilization - point to point (%) Across All Links 2 SIMULATION RESULTS - Model 2 Figure 13 Model 2 Backbone Switch Packets Dropped Figure 14 Model 2 Mode 2 Server CPU Utilization
    • Page 18 Figure 15Model 2 Overall Server Load (requests/sec) Figure 16Model 2 Server Task Processing Time (sec) Figure 17Model 2 Link Utilization - point to point (%)
    • Page 19 Model 3 Figure 18Model 3 Backbone Switch Packets Dropped Figure 19 Model 3 Server CPU Utilization (%) Figure 20Model 3 Overall Server Load (requests/sec) Figure 21Model 3 Server Task Processing Time (sec)
    • Page 20 Figure 22Model 3 Link Utilization - point to point (%) across all links Model 4 Figure 23 Model 4 Backbone Switch Packets Dropped Figure 24 Model 4 Server CPU Utilization (%)
    • Page 21 Figure 25 Model 4 Overall Server Load (requests/sec) Figure 26 Model 4 Server Task Processing Time (sec) Figure 27Model 4 Link Utilization across all links - point to point (%)
    • Page 22 Model Comparisons Figure 28 Comparison of Web and Email Server Loads (requests/sec) on Web and Email Server between models• Significant increase in web and email traffic due to increase usage of web and email services but stillwithin reasonable performance limits