Creating a Multimedia Digital Learning Object in Powerpoint

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Provides instruction on how to create a multimedia DLO by describing the components of DLOs (introduction learning objective, explanation, examples, relevant concepts, assessment and summary), …

Provides instruction on how to create a multimedia DLO by describing the components of DLOs (introduction learning objective, explanation, examples, relevant concepts, assessment and summary), showing how various multi media additions can enhance the DLO, offering three different examples to show the process and how the various components can be arranged to create a learning object.

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  • 1. Creating
    a
    Multimedia
    Digital Learning Object in
    PowerPoint
    Introduction Definitions Objectives Examples Conclusion
  • 2. What is a Digital Learning Object?
    As described on the WSU Sandbox site –
    “New Media Consortium (NMC) defines digital learning objects (DLOs) as small reusable units that can be fitted together in any number of ways to produce customized experiences tied to an educational objective.” http://archive.nmc.org/guidelines/NMC%20LO%20Guidelines.pdf
    • A DLO is often likened to LEGO building blocks
    • 3. A DLO includes small pieces – ie: building blocks
    (photos, text, sound, video) that separately do not
    constitute a comprehensive learning experience
    • When the individual pieces are connected and arranged they create useful
    items such as houses, bridges, etc.
    MOST IMPORTANT
    DLOs are teaching and learning objects
  • 4. The Components of a Digital Learning Object
    Introduction – What is the DLO about?
    Learning Objectives – What will students be able to do? What knowledge will be gained?
    Explanation – What is it – a process, a concept?
    Examples – Some complete, some incomplete to promote engagement, involvement.
    Relationship to relevant concepts – Where does it fit in to the discipline?
    Practice, Assessment - Engage with the learning object, reflect.
    Summary – What was taught?
    Mayer, R.E. (2001) Multimedia Learning, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
    http://digital3.pk.wayne.edu/fady/sandbox/part_three_ii.php
  • 5. What is Multimedia Learning?
    http://www.cortland.edu/cap/Cap100Web/Unit7/Unit_7.htm
    Multimedia learning occurs when people build mental representations from:
    Text, Sound, Graphics, Photographs, Video & Animation
    Mayer, R.E. (2001) . Multimedia learning. New York: Cambridge University Press
  • 6. What Multimedia Elements Can I Use in A DLO?
    TEXT
    PHOTOS
    MUSIC
    WSU VMC 20 Poverty Scene 22060
    ANIMATION
    & VIDEO
    Click Here to Proceed
    GRAPHICS
    COMPUTER CONTROLS
  • 7. What Can Multimedia DLOs Do?
    ● Stimulate creative and writing skills
    Example: Poor Girls Detroit 1900-1910
    ● Present information effectively
    Example: Michigan Theatre
    ● Encourage critical thinking skills
    http://www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk/stillimages/advice/using-images-in-education/
  • 8. DLOs Can Stimulate Creative and Writing Skills
    Poor Girls - Detroit 1900-1910
    Introduction:
    We are going to show how a multimedia DLO can help stimulate creativity and writing skills
    Learning Objectives:
    After completing this multimedia DLO the student will
    be able to:
    • Analyze images based on factual and emotional clues
    • 9. Date images historically
    • 10. Create a digital story within the larger historical structure
    • 11. Explore storytelling from different narrative perspectives
    Explanation:
    This DLO will examine the process of using images to stimulate ideas for writing stories
    Multimediaused to enhance this DLO:
    • Photographs • Text  Graphics
  • 12. DLOs Can Stimulate Creative and Writing Skills
    Poor Girls - Detroit 1900-1910
    Analyzing Photographic Clues
    Unkempt Hair
    Dirty Face
    Wrinkled Dress
    Trash strewn street
    Shoe Style
    Factual Clues:
    Emotional Clues:
    Wary eyes
    Unsmiling expression
    WSU VMC 20 Poverty Scene 22060
  • 13. DLOs Can Stimulate Creative and Writing Skills
    Poor Girls - Detroit 1900-1910
    Analyzing Photographic Clues
    Can help a writer determine:
    The Subject’s:
    • Age (adult or child)
    • 14. Gender (man or woman)
    • 15. Social Status (rich or poor)
    • 16. Emotional State (happy or sad)
    • 17. Personality (open or wary)
    This information can start the creative process for a writer.
    The character’s form begins to take shape in the writer’s mind.
    WSU VMC 20 Poverty Scene 22060
  • 18. DLOs Can Stimulate Creative and Writing Skills
    Poor Girls - Detroit 1900-1910
    Contextualize the images historically
    In 1883 Emma Lazarus wrote the words
    inscribed on the Statue of Liberty:
    "Give me your tired, your poor,
    Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
    The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
    Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
    I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”
    http://www.sonnets.org/lazarus.htm
    The Ideal
    WSU VMC 20 Poverty Scene 22060
    Historical context can help the writer to realize the larger events that create individual stories such as portrayed by the image of the two little girls.
  • 19. DLOs Can Stimulate Creative and Writing Skills
    Poor Girls - Detroit 1900-1910
    The Journey
    Sample steamship contract
    for steerage passenger
    “Crossing the Atlantic was a long, uncomfortable journey. The trip lasted two to three weeks. Immigrants slept and ate in the storage class. This area of the ship was below water level, so it was always dark. Immigrants in steerage were crowded together and had to share their space with livestock animals. The conditions were unsanitary and people often became sick. When the weather was nice , steerage passengers went up to the ship’s deck for a bit of fresh air.”
    http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=sDzpNOFRYmIC&oi=fnd&pg=PA4&dq=steerage+immigrants+1900s&ots=If8WjU77uM&sig=_zmhcBWEAl3sweww2pZqCTJobeI#v=onepage&q=&f=false
    http://www.gjenvick.com/CunardLine/SteamshipTickets/1895-05-29-SteeragePassengerContract.html
  • 20. DLOs Can Stimulate Creative and Writing Skills
    Poor Girls - Detroit 1900-1910
    Contextualize the images historically
    “Between 1870 and 1910, 16 million people immigrated to America”. “The population in poverty was approximately 45% in 1870, it declined to around 30% by 1910, only to reach about 45% in the mid 1930’s …” http://www.uncp.edu/home/canada/work/allam/18661913/index.ht http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/childlabor/ill14.html
    The Reality
    http://www.immigrantslist.org/pages/population_facts_numbers/
  • 21. DLOs Can Stimulate Creative and Writing Skills
    Poor Girls - Detroit 1900-1910
    Who Will Tell The Story?
    An image can present the writer with options to
    explore storytelling from different perspectives.
    What will the story be if told by:
    - as children
    - years later as adults
    WSU VMC 20 Poverty Scene 22060
    By examining multiple narrative perspectives the writer can create a story with greater depth and breadth.
  • 25. DLOs Can Stimulate Creative and Writing Skills
    Poor Girls - Detroit 1900-1910
    Using what you have learned:
    • Analyze the clues in this photograph
    • 26. Put it in historical context
    • 27. Determine who will tell the story
    What are the factual clues?
    What are the emotional clues?
    What was life like in the1920s?
    How many ways can this story?
    • As a family story
    • 28. As a story of hope
    • 29. As a story of poverty in America
    Who should tell the story?
    WSU VMC Poverty Scenes :
    Family and Furniture on Street : Evictions 64802_1
  • 33. DLOs Can Stimulate Creative and Writing Skills
    Poor Girls - Detroit 1900-1910
    SUMMARY:
    This DLO has illustrated how images can stimulate creativity through:
    Analyzing Images for:
    • Factual clues
    • 34. Emotional clues
    2. Creating a story based on historical accuracy
    3. Determining the different perspectives various narrators
  • 35. DLOs Present Information Effectively
    THE Michigan Theatre
    Introduction:
    This multimedia DLO will use the history of the
    Michigan Theatre to illustrate the history of the
    city of Detroit.
    Learning Objectives:
    After completing this DLO the student will
    understand how:
    Architecture can:
    Reflect:  Economic Realities  Cultural Tastes
    Create:  Awe  Fantasy  Escapism
    Trace: • Community History
    Explanation:
    This multimedia DLO will illustrate the concept
    that architecture mirrors the taste, history and economic reality of a community.
    Multimedia used:
    • Text • Photographs • Video
  • 36. DLOs Present Information Effectively
    THE Michigan Theatre
    Sample Vaudeville Poster
    Posters like this helped to lure patrons into the fantasy world of the
    Michigan Theatre.
    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seattle_-_Moore_Theatre_-_early_vaudeville_poster.jpg
  • 37. DLOs Present Information Effectively
    THE Michigan Theatre
    Architectural Design Can Reflect Economic Realities
    “The 1920s were a time of unprecedented prosperity for Detroit. The booming city was a metaphor for American opportunity…huge ornate theaters were built downtown for movies and stage shows.”
    http://guides.travelchannel.com/detroit/city-guides/historical-background
    “The 4,038-seat Michigan Theatre (1927) … was designed in French Renaissance style at a cost of $5 million and was the largest theatre in Michigan.” http://www.buildingsofdetroit.com/places/mi
    $5 Million dollars in 1927
    is the same as $61,98,0000 today.
    http://www.measuringworth.com/calculators/uscompare/result.php
    WSU VMC Michigan Theatre 64050_4
  • 38. DLOs Present Information Effectively
    THE Michigan Theatre
    Architectural Design Can Reflect Cultural Tastes
    The Michigan had a lobby four stories high with room for as many as 1,000 patrons who could wait for the next showing. Velvet ropes contained the crowds while a pianist entertained. Paintings by artists such as Thomas Hovenden, Edwin Blashfield and Douglas Volk adorned the lobby walls. The ceiling provided a sight as awesome as any cathedral, with white marble sculptures of "Cupid and Psyche" and a life-sized pair of rearing horses pulling a Roman chariot…
    the Michigan was "a castle of dreams
    http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=30
    The architectural design of the Michigan Theatre symbolized the wealth, the power and the cultural tastes that existed in Detroit during the 1920s.
    WSU VMC Michigan Theatre 64050_4
  • 39. DLOs Present Information Effectively and Efficiently
    THE Michigan Theatre
    Architectural Design Can Create Awe, Fantasy and Escapism
    “…theater architect John Eberson called movie palaces "the most palatial homes of princes and crowned kings for and on behalf of His Excellency--the American Citizen,“
    http://xroads.virginia.edu/~CAP/PALACE/home.html
    We can see the elements of classical references, music, art, breathtakingly high ceilings all combined to weave an atmosphere to transport patrons into another world.
    WSU VMC Michigan Theatre 64050_4
    “styles ranged from Western to Chinese to French Baroque ... [turning]… movie palaces into an art.”
    http://xroads.virginia.edu/~ug00/3on1/movies/Palaces.htm
  • 40. DLOs Present Information
    THE Michigan Theatre
    Tracing a Community Through its Public Buildings
    1926
    “Detroit is the largest city of opportunity in the world.“
    -Detroit City Directory, 1924-1925
    1976
    The once grand Michigan Theatre closed in 1976. “Tenants in the adjoining office building needed … parking, and … the building owners decided to demolish the theater portion for parking, since it was no longer in use. The theater had to be carved into a parking garage because studies … showed it would endanger the soundness of the adjoining office building. Because of this, much of the theater remains today … the fact that the once-grand theater is now used for parking is as sad as it is ironic.”
    http://www.buildingsofdetroit.com/places/mi
    The Michigan Theatre has been like a barometer of the Detroit’s economic health. As Detroit’s financial health declined so too did the condition of the Michigan Theatre.
    Michigan Theatre Video
    YouTube
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZ-dw5izGVQ
  • 41. DLOs Present Information Effectively
    The Michigan Theatre
    Opened in 1928, during the same economic period as the Michigan Theatre, the Fox Theatre has not only managed to survive but to thrive.
    Using what you have learned explain:
    How the Fox Theatre illustrates architectural design can reflect economic reality, cultural tastes while also creating an atmosphere
    of awe, fantasy and escapism.
    How the Fox Theatre paralleled the economic picture of Detroit.
    Why the Fox Theatre escaped the fate of the Michigan Theatre did not.
    http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=63
  • 42. DLOs Present Information Effectively
    Michigan Theatre
    This multimedia DLO has shown:
    The way buildings can mirror a city’s economic reality
    The connection between architecture and culture
    How architecture can combine historical design features to create fantasy worlds.
    The history of a community
  • 43. Summary
    A Digital Learning Object is made of “small reusable units that can be fitted together in any number of ways to produce customized experiences tied to an educational objective.” http://archive.nmc.org/guidelines/NMC%20LO%20Guidelines.pdf
    In our three DLO examples our “small reusable units” were:
    In the “Poor Girls – Detroit 1900-1910”
    • photo of two girls
    • 44. immigration chart
    • 45. Emma Lazarus poem
    • 46. steerage ticket
    • 47. description of traveling in steerage
    In “The Michigan Theatre” DLO
    • photos of Michigan Theatre (then and now)
    • 48. illustration of vaudeville poster
    • 49. Michigan Theatre facts (size, cost, seating capacity)
    • 50. Architectural design features
    • 51. Cultural Influences in early 20th century theatres
  • Summary
    We followed the seven elements of digital learning objects:
    Introduction:
    “Poor Girls”We are going to show how a multimedia DLO can help stimulate creativity and writing skills
    “Michigan Theatre”This multimedia DLO will use the history of the
    Michigan Theatre to illustrate the history of the
    city of Detroit.
  • 52. Summary
    Learning Objectives:
    “Poor Girls”After completing this multimedia DLO the student will be able to:
    • Analyze images based on factual and emotional clues
    • 53. Date images historically
    • 54. Create a digital story within the larger historical structure
    • 55. Explore storytelling from different narrative perspectives
    “Michigan Theatre” After completing this DLO the student will understand how:
    Architecture can: Reflect:  Economic Realities  Cultural Tastes
    Create:  Awe  Fantasy  Escapism
    Trace: • Community History
  • 56. Multimedia Elements within our DLOs