Getting Things Done and other digital productivity strategies Wendy Stephens MCLA December 3, 2010
 
 
 
50,000+ feet        life               40,000 feet        3-5 years               30,000 feet        1-2 years            ...
mind like water
<ul><li>Getting Things Done </li></ul><ul><li>David Allen, “the Henry Ford of the digital age” </li></ul><ul><li>“ get thi...
GTD principles Always have a collection tool close by. Only use your inboxes as inboxes – don’t use your desk, house, or c...
more GTD strategies lists -- use online list generators like  Remember the Milk  (RTM) or  Google Tasks (in Calendar)  to ...
<ul><li>email: getting to zero </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop a system. The best ones are either very specific (files or ta...
<ul><li>email: getting to zero </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider having different email accounts for commercial transactions ...
Other time management strategies Reading online content: use an RSS aggregator any xml-compliant site: flickr feeds, wikip...
Other time management strategies flickr feeds
Other time management strategies wikipedia updates
Other time management strategies Reading online content: al.com
Other time management strategies Reading online content: twitter
Other time management strategies Reading online content: other people’s del.icio.us bookmarks
Other time management strategies podcasts – great for bringing together student work
Other time management strategies Share bookmarks across machines and using your own comments and controlled vocabulary (de...
Other time management strategies Share bookmarks across machines and using your own comments and controlled vocabulary (de...
Other time management strategies Photo pools (flickr)
Other time management strategies Calendar
Other time management strategies Document sharing (Google documents) A single version of the document
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Getting things done

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Time management using technology

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Getting things done

  1. 1. Getting Things Done and other digital productivity strategies Wendy Stephens MCLA December 3, 2010
  2. 5. 50,000+ feet        life               40,000 feet        3-5 years              30,000 feet        1-2 years                                      20,000 feet        areas of responsibility                           10,000 feet      current projects                               runway      current actions  
  3. 6. mind like water
  4. 7. <ul><li>Getting Things Done </li></ul><ul><li>David Allen, “the Henry Ford of the digital age” </li></ul><ul><li>“ get things out of your head and into a trusted system” </li></ul><ul><li>All the inputs you collect represent an action or a project (group of actions). </li></ul><ul><li>300-400 times a day you will be confronted with new information you must decide upon. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deal with these items early, quickly, and regularly. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It may initially take you as long as 40 seconds to process an email, a memo, or an addition to your schedule. Make it your goal to get to 10 seconds. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 8. GTD principles Always have a collection tool close by. Only use your inboxes as inboxes – don’t use your desk, house, or car. Decide on what will become of material items immediately. Complete projects that will require two minutes or less as soon as they present themselves if you ever plan to do them at all. Don’t allow paper and notes to sit unprocessed. Review your lists and folders as often as required to keep your head empty.
  6. 9. more GTD strategies lists -- use online list generators like Remember the Milk (RTM) or Google Tasks (in Calendar) to create your own personalized list which you can adapt and duplicate as required keyboard shortcuts open document/folders 43 folders labels
  7. 10. <ul><li>email: getting to zero </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop a system. The best ones are either very specific (files or tags like &quot;NATC08&quot; rather than &quot;Technology&quot; or &quot;Professional Development&quot;) or very general, like the Lifehacker &quot;trusted trio:&quot; follow up, archive, hold . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>David Allen suggests folders should exist for themes, topics, or persons. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Never leave a read email in your inbox. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You probably sort through your postal mail over a wastepaper basket. You should scan your inbox with your finger on delete . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emptying the inbox does not imply that the work is done, but rather the &quot;next action&quot; has been taken. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each message remaining in your inbox becomes a psychic burden, generating stress. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 11. <ul><li>email: getting to zero </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider having different email accounts for commercial transactions and a separate account for websites requiring registration. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There are two sorts of email accounts: finite space (MCBOE) requiring more maintenance and virtually unlimited memory (gmail, yahoo, hotmail). In some ways, cheap memory is a curse, because it enables you to save everything. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the &quot;search&quot; feature within your email program. If you have built a system of redundant folders, or nested folders, it may be the most efficient way to get to the information you are looking for. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build time to maintain your inbox into your schedule. Frequency depends upon the volume of communication, but twice a day is adequate for most people. Of course, you may want to review your inbox for new messages more frequently. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Handling your messages more promptly will, paradoxically, allow you to go longer without checking for new messages. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 12. Other time management strategies Reading online content: use an RSS aggregator any xml-compliant site: flickr feeds, wikipedia updates, al.com, twitter, other people’s del.icio.us bookmarks
  10. 13. Other time management strategies flickr feeds
  11. 14. Other time management strategies wikipedia updates
  12. 15. Other time management strategies Reading online content: al.com
  13. 16. Other time management strategies Reading online content: twitter
  14. 17. Other time management strategies Reading online content: other people’s del.icio.us bookmarks
  15. 18. Other time management strategies podcasts – great for bringing together student work
  16. 19. Other time management strategies Share bookmarks across machines and using your own comments and controlled vocabulary (del.icio.us, ma.gnol.ia, furl, diigo)
  17. 20. Other time management strategies Share bookmarks across machines and using your own comments and controlled vocabulary (del.icio.us, ma.gnol.ia, furl, diigo)
  18. 21. Other time management strategies Photo pools (flickr)
  19. 22. Other time management strategies Calendar
  20. 23. Other time management strategies Document sharing (Google documents) A single version of the document

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