COMO Teen Tech Talk

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COMO Teen Tech Talk

  1. 1. Wendy
StephensLibrarian,
Cullman
High
SchoolCullman,
Alabamawstephens@cullmancats.neth?p://tinyurl.com/teentechtalkGeorgia
Council
of
Media
Organizations









































October
3,
2012
  2. 2. What
do
we
know
about
teen
online
behavior?
  3. 3. What
do
we
know
about
teen
online
behavior? “Middle class teens generally receive their training in ICT (information and communication technology) behavior at home…the students rate themselves as being much more computer-savvy than their parents.”Harris, F.J. (2012). I found it on the internet: coming of age online. Chicago: ALA.
  4. 4. What
do
we
know
about
teen
online
behavior? “Most teens I interviewed joined social networks to interact withfriends and peers, often to escape structural and sociallimitations they faced in othercontexts.”boyd, d. (2009). Taken out of context: American teen sociality in networked places. [doctoral dissertation]
  5. 5. What
do
we
know
about
teen
online
behavior?“Not only are teens totally wired, but theyare also multitasking, often consumingseveral different types of media at once.Kids and teens reported that they spent 26percent of their media time using two ormore media simultaneously.”Goodstein, A. (2007). Totally wired: what teens and tweens are really doingonline. New York: St. Martin’s.
  6. 6. What
do
we
know
about
teen
online
behavior?Fully 95% of all teens ages 12-17 are now online and 80% ofthose online teens are users of social media sites74% own a desktop or laptop computer Brenner, J. (2012) Internet and teens.
  7. 7. What
do
we
know
about
teen
mobile
online
 behavior?Bulk of teens are 12 or 13 when they get their first cell phone23% of teens have a smartphoneHalf of all American teens have gone online on their mobilephones in the last 30 days. Brenner, J. (2012) Internet and teens.
  8. 8. What
do
we
know
about
teen
online
behavior
an
 social
networking?3% have an account on Facebook24% have an account on MySpace12% have an account on Twitter7% have an account on a Yahoo site6% have an account on YouTube2% have an account on each of the following: Skype,myYearbook, and Tumblr1% have an account on Google Buzz Brenner, J. (2012) Internet and teens.
  9. 9. InteractiveContent consumptionContent creationResearch
  10. 10. Content consumption Research Content creation Interaction
  11. 11. Content
consumption
Video
Music
Books



  12. 12. Content
consumption:
Video
  13. 13. Content
consumption:
Video
  14. 14. Content
consumption:
Music
  15. 15. Content
Consumption:
Music
  16. 16. Content
Consumption:
Music
  17. 17. Content
Consumption:
Music
  18. 18. Content
Consumption:
Books
  19. 19. Content
Consumption:
Books
  20. 20. Content
Consumption:
Books
  21. 21. Content
Consumption:
Books
  22. 22. Content
consumption:
Books
  23. 23. Content
Consumption:
Books
  24. 24. Content
Consumption:
Books
  25. 25. Content
Consumption:
Books
  26. 26. Content
Consumption:
Books
  27. 27. Content
Consumption:
Books
  28. 28. Research
  29. 29. Research:
New
issues
in
intellectual
honesty http://www.franklinparklibrary.org/images/teen/games.jpg
  30. 30. Research:
When
is
cheating
not
cheating? http://www.franklinparklibrary.org/images/teen/games.jpg
  31. 31. Research:
Search
Portals
  32. 32. Research:
Search
Portals
  33. 33. Research:
Search
Portals
  34. 34. Online
shopping
as
a
form
of
research,
creativity
  35. 35. Teens
not
brand‑loyal
regarding
electronics,
more
about
functionality
  36. 36. “The
great
Information
Age
is
really
an
 explosion
of
non‑information:
it
is
an
 explosion
of
data…
The
opportunity
is
 that
there
is
so
much
information…
The
 catastrophe
is
that
99%
of
it
isn’t
 meaningful
or
understandable.”Alice
Yucht,
Alice
in
Infoland,
February
18,
 2011
  37. 37. Interaction http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaitlynphotos/1834869406/
  38. 38. “Whether it is texting, Facebook, or Skype, millennials, likemost people, mainly use technology as a tool forcommunication.”
  39. 39. Interaction“Todays high-school and college students got their first email account at anaverage age of 13. Most students have had one of their email addressesfor 8 years and have an average of about 2.4 addresses each. But if youreally want to reach these students, you should forget email. Send a textmessage instead.” Perez, S. (2008) Gmail preferred by students, but nothing beats texting. Read Write Web.Yahoo! Mail• Multiple addressmanagement• Chat and text frominbox• Unlimited storage
  40. 40. convergence convergencedivergence
  41. 41. connection wikinomics networking aggregators divergenceconvergence differentiation pod people personal portals long tail virtual identity
  42. 42. Content
creationhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/neoform/300639260/
  43. 43. Content
creation:
Writing
for
an
authentic
audience
  44. 44. Content
creation:
fanfiction.net/book
  45. 45. Content
creation:
Writing
for
an
authentic
audience
  46. 46. http://www.textually.org/textually/archives/cat_mobile_phone_projects_third_world.htmCell phone charging in Uganda
  47. 47. http://www.transformsa.com/images/myfiles/Sexting.jpg22 percent of all teen girls — and 11 percent of teen girls ages 13-16years old — say they have electronically sent, or posted online, nudeor semi-nude images of themselves.One-third of teen boys and one-quarter of teen girls say they havehad nude/semi-nude images shared with them. http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/sextech/PDF/SexTech_Summary.pdf
  48. 48. paleofuturism
  49. 49. “They
don’t
make
paper
books
anymore…” Are
we
post‑print?
  50. 50. Teen
AWaiting
on
WednesdayPeak
Oil3rd
ereader
in
the
householdBacklist
(completist)
Doesn’t
share
  51. 51. Teen
BBrigadoonFree
books
(at
the
library,
at
B&N,
through
the
Nook
bookstore,
scribd)Volume
reader
of
genre
fictionNot
concerned
about
quality
  52. 52. A
new
ownership
model
  53. 53. Be the experton ebooks * *that doesn’t mean you can’t be skeptical also, that doesn’t mean you have to circulate hardware
  54. 54. What
are
we
leaving
behind?
  55. 55. What
are
we
leaving
behind?
  56. 56. What
are
we
leaving
behind?
  57. 57. Still
grappling
with
e‑typese?ing(e‑editing,

e‑marketing,e‑writing)
  58. 58. design
  59. 59. design
  60. 60. persuasive design
  61. 61. http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2011/02/02/133404891/a-parade-restored-a-maurice-sendak-mural-goes-from-bedroom-to-gallery
  62. 62. e
has
the
potential
to
be
paradigm
shift
  63. 63. e
has
the
potential
to
be
paradigm
shift
  64. 64. e
has
the
potential
to
be
paradigm
shift
  65. 65. e
has
the
potential
to
be
paradigm
shift
  66. 66. e
has
the
potential
to
be
paradigm
shift
  67. 67. When
the
hardware
doesn’t
support
the
software…
  68. 68. At
.07
cents
a
use,
Nicholas
Sparks
isn’t
a
candidate
for
ebooks.

  69. 69. At
$152
per
use,
curricular
support
is
a
be?er
candidate
for
“e.”

  70. 70. What
about
the
in‑betweens,
information
which
doesn’t
age
and
can
be
read
in
a
variety
of
ways?
  71. 71. The
curious
case
of
nonfiction….
  72. 72. How do we serve them?
  73. 73. Be
psychic
  74. 74. Get
a
guru
  75. 75. (or,
be?er
yet,gurus)

  76. 76. Introduce
your
teens
to
new
technologies
  77. 77. Learn
the
local
technologies
  78. 78. Prepare
for
augmented
realities
  79. 79. Prepare
for
augmented
realities
  80. 80. Advocate
for
teen‑owned
hardware
  81. 81. Keep
a
finger
in
every
pie
  82. 82. Fight
the
filter
bubble
  83. 83. Reading
is
social
  84. 84. Reading
is
social
  85. 85. Reading
is
social
  86. 86. Read
more
than
ever
  87. 87. Exploit
the
long
tail
  88. 88. Curate
hyper‑local
content
  89. 89. Let
readers
drive
acquisitions
  90. 90. 
and
programming
  91. 91. recommender systems
  92. 92. recommender systems
  93. 93. recommender systems
  94. 94. recommender systems
  95. 95. Recommender
systems
include
human
systems
  96. 96. Fake
it
  97. 97. and
fresh
required
reading
options
  98. 98. Admit
the
fallibility
of
print.
  99. 99. Realize
advocacy
fatigue
exists
  100. 100. Provide
opportunities
  101. 101. Help
redefine
abilities
  102. 102. Don’t forget, #YAsaves

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