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Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility
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Why Corporations Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility

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New Weber Shandwick Social Impact survey on corporate social responsibility. …

New Weber Shandwick Social Impact survey on corporate social responsibility.

Having an impact on critical issues is the number one reason why corporations invest in philanthropic or socially responsible activities, according to executives in new research released today by Weber Shandwick’s Social Impact specialty group.

A second reason given for funding corporate social responsibility (CSR) is the opportunity to see an organization’s values in action (25%).

The survey of more than 200 corporate executives in large-sized companies with responsibility for philanthropic, social responsibility or community relations was conducted by KRC Research in October 2010.

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
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  • Great stuff! Also, all CSR initiatives and projects are not non-profits, however. Now, if only those who really control the budgets would take notice of these benefits....
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  • 1.
  • 2. Table of Contents<br />
  • 3. Research Methodology<br />
  • 4. Executive Summary<br />Having an impact on critical issues is the number one reason why corporations invest in philanthropic or socially responsible activities<br />A second reason for funding CSR is to see an organization’s values in action (25%)<br />Having an impact on issues (30%) outranked several more business-oriented motivations, such as building customer loyalty (15%), differentiating a company from competitors (6%) and engaging and retaining employees (4%)<br />Nearly 80% of executives say they fund nonprofits as part of their CSR, and 73% say nonprofits bring expertise that help CSR programs to thrive<br />Most (72%) say nonprofits make their CSR investment more effective, provide a critical foundation and infrastructure (73%) and help engage consumers (71%)<br />Executive support is a top success factor, with 94% of respondents saying strong and vocal support from senior management is important to the success of CSR<br />A sizable majority (80%) agree that a focus on a specific issue or area is important<br />
  • 5. Strategic Implications<br />The findings of this research offer insights into how corporations can maximize the impact of CSR programs. Key implications include:<br />Companies should focus on critical community issues where they can make the maximum impact and align resources and expertise <br />Nonprofits provide expertise, infrastructure and help engage consumers – they will continue to be important partners in advancing CSR efforts <br />Companies may have broad CSR portfolios, but what matters more is that they have well-designed programs designed to foster genuine change on issues<br />Successful CSR programs require early and active support from senior executives, particularly to help sharpen the focus of CSR and define clear objectives<br />CSR programs have multiple internal and external stakeholders – and communications and community engagement should work together<br />
  • 6. Companies are most focused on impact<br />About a third of executives agree the primary reason to invest in pro-social or CSR programs is to make an impact on critical issues.<br />In your opinion, what is the primary reason your company invests in pro-social or CSR programs?<br />
  • 7. Nonprofit partners are vital to CSR success<br />Most see great value in funding nonprofits as partners in CSR efforts.<br />Does your company fund nonprofit organizations to advance your CSR or pro-social efforts? <br />Do you agree or disagree that nonprofits are valuable partners in CSR efforts?<br />Almost 6 in 10 executives say their company provides funds for nonprofits.<br />The majority also agree that nonprofits are valuable partners for CSR efforts.<br />59%<br />79%<br />
  • 8. Nonprofits bring real value to CSR efforts<br />Executives see multiple ways companies can work with nonprofits to improve CSR efforts. <br />Now I am going to read you some statements about working with nonprofit organizations on CSR or pro-social programs. Please tell me if you completely agree, somewhat agree, neither agree nor disagree, somewhat disagree, or completely disagree.<br />Somewhat disagree<br />Completely disagree<br />Somewhat agree<br />Completely agree<br />
  • 9. Senior-level support and clear goals are key<br />Over 9 in 10 feel the support of senior management and having well defined objectives for programs are the most important aspects of organizations’ CSR efforts.<br />Here is a list of potential elements of CSR or pro-social programs. For each, please tell me how important you feel they are to successful CSR or pro-social programs – absolutely critical, very important, somewhat important, or not too important.<br />Somewhat important<br />Not too important<br />Very important<br />Absolutely critical<br />
  • 10. Key lesson is that CSR shows commitment <br />Most frequently, executives feel CSR programs demonstrate a commitment to serving the community.<br />What is the most important lesson your organization has learned about implementing CSR or pro-social programs?<br />
  • 11. Lessons learned from CSR efforts<br />What is the most important lesson your organization has learned about implementing CSR or pro-social programs?<br />“Pro-social programs help separate the company from others in the same industry on a respected level among customers and audiences.”<br />“To show how loyal we are as a business and to show that we have both good values and smart actions as our business shows potential growth.”<br />“Being committed to our communities builds a bond with consumers and they are more likely to favor us if they see our employees giving back to the community. This is essential to achieving excellence.”<br />Corporate Executives respond…<br />“It helps to inform people everywhere of our beliefs and spreads help all across the country with people who feel the same way as we do. Together we have learned we are a powerful combination and we will bring about change.”<br />“We have learned how much a little help can impact the communities that we work in. Additionally, that people appreciate when large corporations show their human side.”<br />
  • 12. Appendix: Respondent Profile<br />
  • 13. Respondent Profile<br />
  • 14. FOR MORE INFORMATION:<br />PAUL MASSEY, 202.585.2799<br />pmassey@webershandwick.com<br />STEPHANIE BLUMA, 202.585.2755<br />sbluma@webershandwick.com<br />COLIN MOFFETT, 202.585.2045<br />cmoffett@webershandwick.com<br />VICTORIA SNEED, 202.585.2814<br />vsneed@krcresearch.com<br />JONATHAN BENTLEY, 202.585.2732<br />jbentley@krcresearch.com<br />KRCResearch<br />700 13th Street NW<br />Washington, DC 20005<br />

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